Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Radioactive Wild Boars Still Roaming the Forests of Germany

samzenpus posted about 2 months ago | from the regenerating-bacon dept.

Science 212

An anonymous reader writes 28 years after the Chernobyl accident, tests have found that more than one in three Saxony boars give off such high levels of radiation that they are unfit for consumption. In 2009 almost €425,000 ($555,000) was paid out to hunters in compensation for wild boar meat that was too contaminated to be sold. "It doesn't cover the loss from game sales, but at least it covers the cost of disposal," says Steffen Richter, the head of the Saxon State Hunters Association.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Happy Labour Day from The Golden Girls! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801643)

Thank you for being a friend
Traveled down the road and back again
Your heart is true, you're a pal and a cosmonaut.

And if you threw a party
Invited everyone you knew
You would see the biggest gift would be from me
And the card attached would say, thank you for being a friend.

Re:Happy Labour Day from The Golden Girls! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801803)

It's "you're a pal and a confidant". If you're going to do it, do it right.

Re:Happy Labour Day from The Golden Girls! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801813)

YHBT. By a really old one, too.

Interesting line from TFA: (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801667)

"Wild boar are thought to be particularly affected because they root through the soil for food, and feed on mushrooms and underground truffles that store radiation. Many mushrooms from the affected areas are also believed to be unfit for human consumption. "

That's pretty interesting. Chernobyl was a long time ago.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (5, Informative)

Ihlosi (895663) | about 2 months ago | (#47801699)

Chernobyl was a long time ago.

It was only about one half-life (Cs-137) ago.

Also, Cs-137 gets washed to lower soil layers very slowly (a few millimeters per year).

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (2)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 months ago | (#47801841)

It seems odd that the pigs are too irradiated to eat but seem to thrive and breed just fine.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (2)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 2 months ago | (#47801885)

Nothing odd about it. Their females are fertile when less than a ear old, their males two years after birth. Long term effects of radiation are felt later.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (5, Insightful)

Waffle Iron (339739) | about 2 months ago | (#47801967)

It seems odd that the pigs are too irradiated to eat but seem to thrive and breed just fine.

Most people these days prefer to live a good deal longer than their earliest possible breeding time.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802449)

"Most people these days prefer to live a good deal longer than their earliest possible breeding time."

try telling that to a male praying mantis...

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (2)

sillybilly (668960) | about 2 months ago | (#47802605)

Now you want to call praying mantis people too? wow, what an abandonment of specieism that would be.. So when are mosquitoes gonna be protected as having individual rights under the Constitution? Not anytime soon, I reckon..

So anyway, to the seemingly well thriving radioactive wild boars, my answer is what about them seafood (tuna fish) that created dementia and mental retardation in a California child, because her mother fed her a can of tuna fish every morning, and it turned out he got mercury poisoning, and they narrowed it to the tuna, which is a top predator, and methyl-mercury is lypophilic (fat loving) and it bioaccumulates.. By far the greatest amount of yearly mercury emissions comes from coal, which is the main alternative to nuclear when it comes to electricity generation. And all other fossils create global warming, ask the people who live near what used to be Lake Chad, where they get their water when they are thirsty, and compare that to the seemingly happy radioactive wild boars. Unlike with coal, where almost no matter how precisely you do your job, the pollution is there, with nuclear it all comes down to getting it done right. I know that's easier said than done, because to err is human. Then you have to design assuming errors will happen, and deal with them at the design phase, and then again, to err is human, because the Japs fucked up assuming the highest tsunami wave would be such and such hitting Fukushima, and designed wave breakers for it, that ended up not tall enough for when the incident happened. For their excuse, they never had a tsunami wave that high since written history, so to err is human, but to forgive them for their mistake in the design is divine.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (1)

ilguido (1704434) | about 2 months ago | (#47802411)

Cesium radiated boars were found in northwestern Italy last year(Google translated article [google.it] ), and Chernobyl was blamed. However I still wonder what the cesium levels were before Chernobyl: perhaps it's just that boars are like bananas and tobacco.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802461)

It's teh mushrooms actually. They are very good at collecting and retaining radiation. Boars eat them.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47802803)

North Italy, Austria and then south Germany where the first regions hit by the Chernobyl explosion.

Re:Interesting line from TFA: (5, Informative)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 2 months ago | (#47801929)

Mushrooms can be used to bioconcentrate metals. Some species prefer cesium:
http://www.herbmuseum.ca/conte... [herbmuseum.ca]

Duke Nukem 3D (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801671)

Duke Nukem 3D popularized the radioactive wild boar concept.

Re:Duke Nukem 3D (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801897)

Who ever voted -1, WHOOoooooooooosh

Re:Duke Nukem 3D (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802097)

What do you expect? Acknowledging the existence of mutated pig-cops in a work of fiction from 1996 requires the ability to imagine disrespect for authority. Thinking disrespectfully of authority is not permissible in 2014 Terrorist America.

Re:Duke Nukem 3D (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802177)

Also, in reality, it is more like mutated pig-paramilitary. Just look at today police. Shameful.

Reall problem: German radiation phobia (-1, Troll)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 2 months ago | (#47801683)

The real problem here is the ridiculous standard in Germany for the amount of radiation considered safe. There is nothing unsafe about eating this pork, as long as it is cooked well to kill the trichinosis.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (4, Funny)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 2 months ago | (#47801763)

Wouldn't the trichinosis already be irradiated anyway? Just think of the radiation as a 'very-slow-roasting' system. The meat is practically falling off the bone before the animal is even dead.

.
For the humor-impaired, this is a joke.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801791)

Radiation is good for you. As said certain U.S. female politician on live TV.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801893)

Ann Coulter. Not even up to politician level of smug idiocy, she's a Fox News talking head/moron.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (3, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 2 months ago | (#47802151)

Ann Coulter. Not even up to politician level of smug idiocy, she's a Fox News talking head/moron.

Ann Coulter is a political Kim Kardashian. She thrives on drawing attention to herself by acting like an idiot. But her statement is a tiny kernel of truth wrapped up in a big ball of stupidity. Slightly higher levels of background radiation may actually be good for you [wikipedia.org] . There is some evidence, in both animals and humans, that slightly higher levels of external (not ingested) radiation, over extended time, can reduced cancer rates and improve health. One hypothesis is that the radiation "exercises" the cellular repair mechanism, and keeps if functioning well.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (1)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 2 months ago | (#47801805)

Yeah, its amazing how these pigs can thrive so well and show no ill effects. Green Peace should be loving this miracle, it only harms people!

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801817)

We should trust "shanghai bill"'s own personal radiation standard over the more stringent German standard, because he says so guys.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 2 months ago | (#47801823)

It looks like the limits are in line with most of the world [fukuleaks.org] .

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 2 months ago | (#47801965)

It looks like the limits are in line with most of the world [fukuleaks.org] .

Those are for overall food radiation levels. If you ate wild pork for 100% of your diet, those numbers would be important. But wild boar is something that is eaten infrequently. It is like mercury in tuna. If you are pregnant, and eat tuna everyday, it is a concern. Otherwise, a tuna sandwich a few times a month is harmless.

Disclaimer: I am a vegetarian, and eat neither tuna nor wild boar. But I do eat bananas, which contain enough radiation to occasionally trigger radiation alarms [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (3, Interesting)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 2 months ago | (#47801855)

hmm...

Assuming all of the radioactivity is due to Cs-137, that 600 Bq/kg limit translates to 0.0000003 micrograms of Cs-137 in any given kg of wild pork.

Okay, I can buy the argument that that "safe" limit errs on the side of caution a bit much....

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (4, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 months ago | (#47801917)

hmm...

Assuming all of the radioactivity is due to Cs-137, that 600 Bq/kg limit translates to 0.0000003 micrograms of Cs-137 in any given kg of wild pork.

Okay, I can buy the argument that that "safe" limit errs on the side of caution a bit much....

The real problem from a meltdown isn't really the radiation. While that's scary and all... the real problem is what else is released and what the shorter half life elements decay into. Most of what the control rods are made out of are horrific heavy metals, and during the Chernobyl incident the Russians panicked and dumped large amounts of liquid lead and cement laced with lead into the basement of the reactor. The lead boiled off and then rained back down all over the region. If I lived in the area, I'd be more concerned about that lead than I would be about the radiation.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802773)

That's true, but not relevant to Germany. That's just too far away from Chernobyl to be affected by lead dispersal. Cesium on the other hand is water-soluable which means it can be dispersed by water - including rain and clouds. These boars are indeed digging up Cesium.

That said, I'm surprised that the Cesium is filtered out so well in the soil. Probably an ion exchange thing.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 2 months ago | (#47801949)

Especially given that the average human body is giving off about 4500 Bq continuously.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801983)

You're stupid enough to believe that the problem with Cs-137 is that eating it will cause you to gain weight? And from this you deduce that the most interesting property of a given quantity of Cs-137 is its mass?

And you still beat the captcha when you registered your account?

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 2 months ago | (#47802199)

Assuming all of the radioactivity is due to Cs-137, that 600 Bq/kg limit translates to 0.0000003 micrograms of Cs-137 in any given kg of wild pork.

Cesium tends to behave like potassium in biological systems. It has a biological half-life of about 100 days (half will be excreted by the body in this amount of time). But that can be accelerated by consuming more potassium. So just sprinkle some "lite-salt" on your next dish of wild boar.

For a country so good at engineering... (1, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | about 2 months ago | (#47801905)

... they have a very backwards, almost medieval view of anything nuclear.

Also I'm sure that idiot Merkel decided to close all their nuclear power stations because she thought they'd get nice cheap gas from russia. Hmm, wonder how thats working out for her now...

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802131)

Also I'm sure that idiot Merkel decided to close all their nuclear power stations because she thought they'd get nice cheap gas from russia. Hmm, wonder how thats working out for her now...

Nuclear power is used for generating electricity. Russian natural gas is used solely for (some) cooking and winter heating. They are two separate sources of energy for two separate things. Your attack on Merkel is clueless.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802145)

Also I'm sure that idiot Merkel decided to close all their nuclear power stations because she thought they'd get nice cheap gas from russia. Hmm, wonder how thats working out for her now...

At the peak, German nuclear generation was 133 TWh in 2011. Since then, German renewables generation has grown from 47 TWh/year to 178 TWh/year, Germany can now meet demand without any nuclear and without additional gas imports.

I'm sorry the facts broke your narrative.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (3, Insightful)

Gareth Iwan Fairclough (2831535) | about 2 months ago | (#47802603)

Also I'm sure that idiot Merkel decided to close all their nuclear power stations because she thought they'd get nice cheap gas from russia. Hmm, wonder how thats working out for her now...

At the peak, German nuclear generation was 133 TWh in 2011. Since then, German renewables generation has grown from 47 TWh/year to 178 TWh/year, Germany can now meet demand without any nuclear and without additional gas imports.

I'm sorry the facts broke your narrative.

Why do I get this funny feeling that the "178 TWh/year" figure is from the rated capacity factors and not the actual production?

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802713)

Even if it were actual production this wouldn't help much. Demand is constant, supply not so much.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (1, Flamebait)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47802791)

Why do I get this funny feeling that the "178 TWh/year" figure is from the rated capacity factors and not the actual production?
Because you are an idiot? But for all idiots the old saying is true: google.com is your friend.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (2, Interesting)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 2 months ago | (#47802259)

It's the green disease.

Pseudo-environmentalism (the thing practiced by the likes of Greenpeace) mixed with misinformed NIMBYism.

People who speak up against this are labeled haters of the environment. Meanwhile, the greens degenerate into ever more radical forms of pseudo-environmentalism.

Any engineer with half a brain and some knowledge on the subject immediately concludes that nuclear power is by far the better realistic option. However, society is not made up exclusively of engineers.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (2)

Tokolosh (1256448) | about 2 months ago | (#47802347)

This kind of environmentalism is based on faith, and not on science. It should therefore be called a religion and lumped with the other populist delusions.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (2)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 2 months ago | (#47802691)

Any engineer with half a brain and some knowledge on the subject immediately concludes that nuclear power is by far the better realistic option.

How do you explain this [wikipedia.org] then?

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802737)

There is some kind of implicit hysteria involved whenever someone says "radioactive" or "radiation". It's almost approaching the same levels as shouting "Jehova" had in times long past. People do not differentiate between doses and stuff. Such details are just seen as a distraction. If it emits radiation, it's the devil's work and must be banned!

The thing is that this started with Greenpeace, spread into the green party and from there even into other political parties and the advocates of this position have now managed to instill a profound fear into the population after about 30 years of indoctrination. It's not rational anymore. You can be rational and argue against stuff like nuclear power, but the vast majority of Germans is not even rational enought to try and learn the facts.

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802805)

Same anonymous coward. Sorry for replying to my own post. I just remembered this Harlan Elison quote: "everybody has a right to an informed opinion". Not in Germany, it seems. :(

Re:For a country so good at engineering... (1, Troll)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47802767)

Unlike you, "the Idiot Merkel" has a PhD in Physics.
And as you are not aware about German politics: the exit from nuclear power production was decided 10 years before her by the Schroeder (red/green) government.
The 'idiot Merkel' reverted that decision, extending the run time of nuclear reactors for another 20(?) years. Good for her she realized after Fukushima, that this was a bad idea. Otherwise she had lost the next election. WE DON'T WANT NUCLEAR POWER!
The idiot is you. We live in a fucking fake democracy, we can not decide about ANYTHING AT ALL! Otherwise we never even have had nuclear power at all! And now idiots like you run around and proclaim ignorantly: the german idiots abandon nuclear power!? WTF: if we would live in a true democracy there was nothing to abandon! We simply would not have it in the first place!

Re:Real problem: German radiation phobia (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802115)

Apparenlty Cs-137 is the radionuclide of concern and 600 Bq/kg is the threshold for safety. The committed dose equivalent per unit intake for ingested Cs-137 is 1.35e-8 Sv/Bq (Eckerman, Limiting Values of Radionuclide Intake and Air Concentration and Dose Conversion Factors for Inhalation, Submersion and Ingestion, EPA-520/1-88-020, September 1988, Table 2.2, p. 166). This works out to be 8.1 uSv/kg at the threshold. To accumulate an effective dose of 1 mSv (100 mrem) a year, which is the US limit for a dose to the general public and apparently also the German limit, would require eating 123 kg of wild boar. That's a lot of pig.

Re:Reall problem: German radiation phobia (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47802725)

The levels are the same as everywhere else.
But be my guest ... as you hardly get a hunting license as a foreigner, collect some mushrooms and see how far it gets you eating them.
Can only increase your IQ, can't it?

I guess that explains (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801709)

why my Westphalian ham is so expensive.

Re:I guess that explains (1)

Sique (173459) | about 2 months ago | (#47801891)

While Westphalia is part of the ancient settlement area of the historical Saxons, contemporary Saxony has nothing to do with it. Actually, the title of Archduke of Saxony was handed to the Duke of Meissen, when the original Saxon line of Achedukes died out in the 15th century, carring the name Saxony from today's Westphalia and Lower Saxony to Meissen and Dresden.

Re:I guess that explains (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 2 months ago | (#47802595)

You just red-lined my non-sequiturometer and renewed my faith in Slashdot at the same time.

Prevailing winds? (1)

miller701 (525024) | about 2 months ago | (#47801757)

Wouldn't the prevailing winds (west to east as far as I know) in Saxony have inhibited the drift of radiation from Chernobyl? Dresden for example is over 700 miles East of Chernobyl.

Re:Prevailing winds? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801829)

Dresden for example is over 700 miles East of Chernobyl.

Yeah, something like 15,000 miles, right?

Re:Prevailing winds? (1)

Sique (173459) | about 2 months ago | (#47801909)

No, 700 miles is pretty close. 850 would be more closer though, it's about 1300 km.

Re:Prevailing winds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801955)

It aint 1300 km to the East of Chernobyl, dumbass.

Re:Prevailing winds? (1)

DamnOregonian (963763) | about 2 months ago | (#47801961)

He was making a joke... Dresden is west of Chernobyl, not east... Unless you go the long way around :)

Re:Prevailing winds? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47802201)

Well, since Dresden is in Germany and Germany is in the EU, going the long way around is usually how it's done...

Re:Prevailing winds? (1)

DamnOregonian (963763) | about 2 months ago | (#47802231)

I feel like there's a joke there that I'm not getting...

Re:Prevailing winds? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47802459)

If you knew EU bureaucracy, you'd get the joke.

Re:Prevailing winds? (2)

Golden_Rider (137548) | about 2 months ago | (#47802041)

No, 700 miles is pretty close. 850 would be more closer though, it's about 1300 km.

Nope, indeed Dresden IS about 15000 miles or so EAST of Chernobyl. And about 800 miles WEST of it.

Re:Prevailing winds? (1)

miller701 (525024) | about 2 months ago | (#47801941)

Yeah. Sorry, I flipped the cities around Chernobyl's east of Dresden

Re:Prevailing winds? (2)

MtHuurne (602934) | about 2 months ago | (#47801903)

I don't think the prevailing winds matter all that much: it is the winds in the first days after the accident that matter, since during that time the radioactive particles were still in the air. I know that here in the Netherlands (west of Germany) in the months after the accident some types of crops were destroyed because they were considered unsafe for consumption.

Re:Prevailing winds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801925)

The prevailing winds are not interesting, it's the actual winds that count. In the days and weeks after the Chernobyl incident the actual winds were in the news daily. Purely from memory we did get some crap blown our way and rained out.

Re:Prevailing winds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802027)

Prevailing does not mean constant.

Revelation lays in mushrooms and acorns. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801775)

It's what those animals eat.

Preheated? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801777)

Maybe it's extra tender from all that slow cooking...

Re:Preheated? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801797)

One thing's for sure - this pork is hot!

Silver lining (4, Funny)

Nidi62 (1525137) | about 2 months ago | (#47801787)

Since a lot of hog hunts are done at night, the slight glow should make the boars a lot easier to see

Re:Silver lining (-1, Troll)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 2 months ago | (#47801923)

That's a pretty disrespectful way to refer to fat chicks.

Re:Silver lining (2)

Ihlosi (895663) | about 2 months ago | (#47802011)

Since a lot of hog hunts are done at night, the slight glow should make the boars a lot easier to see

If you shoot a hog that's radioactive enough to give it a visible glow, you will lose your hunting license, face fines and possibly jail time, since using unnatural light sources while hunting is prohibited.

(This is Germany, what did you expect?)

consumption (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801821)

I find it odd the boar is contextualized to be either something we can, or cannot consume. The real problem is how this
affects the ecosystem, not if we are able to consume boar sausages or not.

Re:consumption (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 2 months ago | (#47801933)

The ecosystem is not affected by radioactive boars; the ecosystem causes boars to become radioactive. There is therefore no way in which this affects the ecosystem, and is therefore not a problem. Meanwhile, people eating contaminated food is an actual problem, as the summary rightfully mentions.

Re:consumption (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802147)

People have caused boars to become radioactive. Boars (as are we) are part of the ecosystem. If we do happen to consume these boars, the radioactivity will spread across the ecosystem. Also, simply considering boars to be wild game is ethically problematic, which is why the point was raised.

you, sir ... (0)

znrt (2424692) | about 2 months ago | (#47801837)

"It doesn't cover the loss from game sales, but at least it covers the cost of disposal," says Steffen Richter, the head of the Saxon State Hunters Association.

... are a waste, and I'd gladly cover your cost of disposal.

Auto-shotgun (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 months ago | (#47801861)

Excellent for radioactive boars, bloodsuckers and chimeras.

Spam (1)

mdsolar (1045926) | about 2 months ago | (#47801863)

There has got to be a spam joke here someplace: In SOVIET Russia boars spam you.?.?

Re:Spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801937)

Get out of here STALKER!

Reason to not read the article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801867)

The reporter's name just may be April O'Neil.

Take the risk with our irradiated meat! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47801953)

It's not like this would be any worse than eating smoked meats, or those grilled over a flame.
People are allowed to do that literally every hour of the day all around the world.
(they are legally allowed to do considerably worse damage to their bodies, but that is another point)

It's not like smoking is totally safe, it still has massive run-on effects in the human body even long after quitting.
It is cumulative damage just like radiation is.
Likewise with many other totally legal things, like alcohol.

As long as it is clearly labelled, why is there any problem?
You need a little radiation in ye boy, how else is the human race going to become immune to radiation damage?! Eat up son.

They do not mention the radioactive level (2)

aepervius (535155) | about 2 months ago | (#47801973)

What are we speaking of ? 2 time the normal acceopted level (aka, really low but still declared unfit under the linear model , but way less than living in a granite mountain ?), or are we speaking very high ? Also what is the isotope here ? The linked article certainly is as uninformative as it gets.

Found it (4, Informative)

aepervius (535155) | about 2 months ago | (#47802017)

1) germany apparently forbid anything above 700 bq/Kg , whereas otehr country do it at 3000 Bq/Kg.

2) Average contamination in 2009 was 7000 Bq/Kg in the highiest contaminated area.

I wish the article could have told that.

Re:Found it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802095)

Which means this is nothing but a hunter subsidy. Like whaling for Japan where their excuse is "whales eat all the fish".

Re:Found it (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 2 months ago | (#47802657)

Which means this is nothing but a hunter subsidy. Like whaling for Japan where their excuse is "whales eat all the fish".

which is really odd when it comes to baleen whales which feed on kill on zooplacton.

Re:Found it (2)

brambus (3457531) | about 2 months ago | (#47802239)

Average contamination in 2009 was 7000 Bq/Kg in the highiest contaminated area.

60% of the time, it works every time [youtube.com] :)

I'll let you in on a little secret (1)

conscarcdr (1429747) | about 2 months ago | (#47801989)

The hunters were probably more radioactive still...

Re:I'll let you in on a little secret (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47802215)

Nah, all the alcohol washes that right out of the system.

Re:I'll let you in on a little secret (1)

conscarcdr (1429747) | about 2 months ago | (#47802335)

+1 for STALKER reference...

Wizards (1)

mdsolar (1045926) | about 2 months ago | (#47802003)

The world blew up in a thousand atomic fireballs. The first blast was set off by five terrorists. It took two million years... for some of the radioactive clouds to allow some sun in. By then, only a handful of porcine survived. The rest of the pigs had changed into hideous mutants. These mutant species floundered in the bad areas... radioactive lands that never allowed them to become boars again... and made each birth a new disaster. http://www.springfieldspringfi... [springfiel...ield.co.uk]

Where are my mutants at? (1)

Jonifico (3799211) | about 2 months ago | (#47802093)

Do you guys know if there's any cases of mutant, deformed boars because of the radiation that hits the town? I've seen some (awful) cases with people, but wouldn't know with animals. Now, is the government paying the hunters to get rid of the bodies, basically?

Concentration through the food chain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802105)

The Cesium is deposited in a layer below the top soil. Mushrooms and other plants have their roots in said top soil and deposit the nasty stuff in their fruit. Wild boar (and other game) loves to munch on said fruits and gets irradiated enough to be unsafe for consumption.

Nothing new here, move along...

Recently sighted... (1)

CODiNE (27417) | about 2 months ago | (#47802129)

Reports are coming in of a girl riding on the back of a giant wolf, apparently hunting large boar with a spear.

On the good side... (1)

guygo (894298) | about 2 months ago | (#47802143)

Mom loves the way the meat glows when you cook it!

Hot Frogs on the Loose (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 2 months ago | (#47802255)

Song [frogsonice.com] inspired by real radioactive frogs (not turtles [wikipedia.org] or slugs [wikia.com] ) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA.

So much for all the mandatory testing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802511)

In all my years of shooting cute furry woodland animals in the suspiciously non-glowing forests of central and eastern Poland, I've never actually had any of my kills tested for radioactivity.

And yet the meat safety debate rages on over here, focusing mainly on multiple exotic diseases the aforementioned hogs may or may not actually carry, and which have not actually been positively tested for in decades.

As a point of interest, running a huge-ass late soviet-era geiger counter over a slab of fresh hog meat (two-day old kill, frozen) DOES in fact show slightly elevated radiation levels in comparison with all the background radiation. God knows how wildly inaccurate this thing is and what kind of gradation the analog needle uses (since, as with all soviet engineering, the thing still works perfectly fine, but nearly all markings are either too faded to be legible, or have simply fallen off - like the scale), and how much of that was me running the test inside an old barn (old enough to have already been 100-something years old when Chernobyl went ka-blam), but still. Gonna run a better test tomorrow, hopefully in a more controlled manner.

I hope the fucking Russians are paying for this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802513)

Yes, I know that Chernobyl is in the Ukraine, but it's the fucking Russians and their succession of imposed dictatorships that caused this.

When are we going to get our... (1)

ComputersKai (3499237) | about 2 months ago | (#47802559)

When are we going to get our Spider-Ham movie now?

government coddling (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 2 months ago | (#47802687)

I scanned all of the comments and nobody had grabbed onto a fundamental problem in the summary. Why is the government of Germany reimbursing hunters for radioactive meat, when the chernobyl happened 30 years ago in another country? How does this make Germany cut checks? Do they also cut a check if a boar is dieseased or otherwise doesn't meet health codes?

my motto: if a food doesn't meet health standards, then you can't sell it. I'm not going to wipe your bottom for you and buy your contaminated boars.

Re:government coddling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802743)

Having seen a car that hit a wild boar in Germany, I'm guessing that they want to keep the hunting community alive despite the meat not being consumable.
The damage was extreme and very gory, with the boar seemingly optimized to destroy as much of a vehicle as possible on impact.
It was a coin-toss between P-X-ing it for a same year model and actually repairing the poor thing.

axiom ONE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802779)

radioactivity is BAD for you. assume this to be true and live longer!
avoid it as much as possible!
you can now return to regular scheduled programing brought to you by safe/clean/green "nu-clear" power.

that was no accident (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802799)

The Chernobyl Incident was no accident. The operators intentionally violated safety protocols to see what would happen. It was more akin to reckless driving where the driver floors the throttle and slams head first into a brick wall.

Personally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47802823)

...I found this story rather boaring.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?