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Scientists Find Traces of Sea Plankton On ISS Surface

Soulskill posted about 2 months ago | from the space-stations-like-to-swim dept.

ISS 117

schwit1 sends this report from the ITAR-TASS News Agency: An experiment of taking samples from illuminators and the ISS surface has brought unique results, as scientists had found traces of sea plankton there, the chief of an orbital mission on Russia's ISS segment told reporters. Results of the scope of scientific experiments which had been conducted for a quite long time were summed up in the previous year, confirming that some organisms can live on the surface of the International Space Station for years amid factors of a space flight, such as zero gravity, temperature conditions and hard cosmic radiation. Several surveys proved that these organisms can even develop. He noted that it was not quite clear how these microscopic particles could have appeared on the surface of the space station.

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But is it really plankton? (1)

penguinoid (724646) | about 2 months ago | (#47707257)

Or did they just find something that kind of looks like some?

Re:But is it really plankton? (5, Funny)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 2 months ago | (#47707403)

Of course it is really plankton. The real issue is is it Sea Plankton as claimed. Or are our oceans full of Space Plankton?

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 months ago | (#47707741)

Miniature giant space plankton, as it happens.

Re:But is it really plankton? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47715343)

GO FOR THE EYES, BLOOP! GO FOR THE EEEEEEEEEYES!!

obligatory non caps forced by filter fuck you dice you suck shit through a straw please die a horrible death from gonorrhea

Re:But is it really plankton? (4, Insightful)

Tuidjy (321055) | about 2 months ago | (#47708151)

Let see.

Did viable Space Plankton drift from outer space to the ISS as it was orbiting Earth, and just happened to be DNA-identical to the one that has been living (and maybe evolving) in Earth's seas?

Or was Sea Plankton carried by the wind to the hold of the vehicle carrying these components up from cape Canaveral?

Oh, my... so hard to decide which is more likely.

Re:But is it really plankton? (2)

ShaunC (203807) | about 2 months ago | (#47708201)

Next week on Search for Ancient Plankton, renowned expert S. Squarepantopoulous explores the difference between space plankton and sea plankton. Only on H2, check local listings.

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47711421)

Because, Aliens.

Re: But is it really plankton? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708971)

AHA! So it's really WIND plankton!

Re: But is it really plankton? (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | about 2 months ago | (#47709675)

Or anti-gravity plankton! Maybe it's trying to get off the earth and we caught some of it like a bug on the windshield...

Re: But is it really plankton? (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 2 months ago | (#47709793)

Probably fell off a passing whale that was on its way to talk to Vega.

Re:But is it really plankton? (4, Interesting)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 months ago | (#47709071)

Well, the cargo ship is one possibility, but when you consider the scale of the oceans and just how close the ISS is to them: if the Pacific Ocean were a sheet of Letter sized paper, the ISS would be zipping along 1/4" above it, and the ISS has been skimming along near the Earth's surface like this for years and years.

Now, think about hurricanes, typhoons, winter storms, and everything else that violently churns the ocean surface - aerosolizing some tiny fraction of it, but still including billions upon billions of plankton that go for a flight every year. Most fall back into the ocean, but some inevitably fly quite high....

What would be amazing to me is if these sea-launched plankton could actually hitch a ride on the passing ISS without getting lethally damaged in the transition. I suppose that on their scale, hitting a wall moving hundreds of miles per hour might not be as disruptive as it is for larger, multicellular organisms.

Re: But is it really plankton? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709617)

Or if they hitched a ride on a passing asteroid which traveled far enough away from the sun fast enough to freeze the organisms, traveled for 1,000,000 years and crashed into a small water-rich planet , the third from its sun, in a small solar system on one of the arms of the spiral galaxy named The Milky Way

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

u38cg (607297) | about 2 months ago | (#47710395)

Well, when you hit a wall at several hundred miles an hour the damage is mechanical. At plankton scale it's effectively just chemistry.

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

notonthegrid (1414053) | about 2 months ago | (#47713433)

Maybe there was a layer of dead plankton that built up over time, and
provided some 'cushion' so later arrivals had a softer landing on the
surface of the ISS?

Re:But is it really plankton? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709035)

OR, have tHEY burnt so many holes in the ionosphere using HAARP and raised so much man-made weather and water vapor supersaturated with barium and aluminum and plankton now it seems into space that traces of the content of (our) oceans are showing up on spacecraft orbiting in the magnetosphere and beyond? Its a runaway madness on this planet that no one seems to get.

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | about 2 months ago | (#47710625)

And where there's Space Plankton, the must be Space Whales. Man the harpoons maties!.

Re:But is it really plankton? (1)

Forever Wondering (2506940) | about 2 months ago | (#47708093)

Perhaps it was "The Green Slime" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt00... [imdb.com]

Re:But is it really plankton? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708311)

That's what I thought of. Let's all sing...
"Green Sliiiiiiime!!!!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

nuke it in orbit... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707265)

what makes you so sure it is of terrestrial origins?

Re:nuke it in orbit... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 months ago | (#47707783)

what makes you so sure it is of terrestrial origins?

Unless this is Star Trek, where the entire biodiversity of the galaxy can be accounted for by face paint and is sexually interoperable with starfleet captains, we can make an overwhelmingly likely inference based on the chemistry. If its DNA and assorted important chemistry closely matches a terrestrial species it is very likely to be from around here.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707829)

The basis for this, in the Star Trek universe, is that all (or most) the bipedal species you see (the ones that can sexually inter-operate with star fleet captains and crew members) come from the same root DNA planted by an ancient alien species.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (1)

Livius (318358) | about 2 months ago | (#47708397)

Because species that diverged genetically several billion years ago will physically closely resemble each other.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708891)

Because species that diverged genetically several billion years ago will physically closely resemble each other.

At least on Class M planets.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (2)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 2 months ago | (#47708979)

They look completely different. Watch:

Human
*puts forehead ridge on*
Alien
*takes forehead ridge off*
Human
*puts forehead ridge on*
Alien

In unrelated news, Clark Kent and Superman look NOTHING alike.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709673)

I don't know, convergent evolution or genetic pre-programming or something? As the MST3K theme song says, "If you're wondering how he eats and breathes and other science facts, repeat to yourself 'it's just a show,' I should really just relax."

Re:nuke it in orbit... (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 months ago | (#47709087)

I don't doubt it's from Earth, to me the intriguing question is how did it get from the ocean to the station - did it hitch a ride with a launch vehicle, or is this high altitude sea spray?

If it is sea spray, it should be found on most long serving LEO satellites.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about 2 months ago | (#47711233)

The space shuttle launch pads are about a kilometer away from the ocean. I was under the impression that satellies weren't exposed payloads until they near the end of the burn of the rocket.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47710273)

Think - "Martian Chronicles" by Ray Bradbury.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47711067)

In a world that takes weeks to even identify the correct Linnaean Kingdom of orange biomass that washes up along the shore or Inupiat village, don't look for a definitive answer any time soon.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47713639)

we can make an overwhelmingly likely inference based on the chemistry

No, we can't. We only know of one set of commands that can assemble themselves at the molecular level and constitute life. We have zero evidence beyond hand-waiving theory that anything else can even exist. The only thing we can say if we see DNA is that it exists and try to work out how it got from Earth to the ISS if it did come from Earth. Skeptisism isn't science by any stretch of the imagination you fucking blowhard.

Re:nuke it in orbit... (1)

LienRag (1787684) | about 2 months ago | (#47714687)

Well, if Space Planction can came as close to earth as to cling on the ISS, it probably can fall on earth itself too...
So where would you find DNA differences?

OMG SPACE PLANKTON!! (2)

Narcocide (102829) | about 2 months ago | (#47707291)

Star Whales coming soon to a galaxy near you!!

Re:OMG SPACE PLANKTON!! (1)

hort_wort (1401963) | about 2 months ago | (#47709451)

Star Whales coming soon to a galaxy near you!!

Woah!! Let's calm down here! We should start with engineering space jellyfish first and work up....

IANAS, But... (0)

flayzernax (1060680) | about 2 months ago | (#47707305)

Sounds like Nasa is still not quite ready to admit how ubiquitous life is in the cosmos. Lest they get shut down forever and everyone lose their jobs.

Re:IANAS, But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707371)

they'll just be reformed into the Federal Agency for Prospecting Space

captcha: consent

This actually makes perfect sense. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707313)

This doesn't seem unreasonable to me.

Many forms of sea plankton are microscopically small. They can easily become trapped within evaporated water droplets. And the ISS isn't really in the dead of space; it's still within the ionosphere, which itself consists partially of water vapor.

So it makes perfect sense that sea plankton would end up trapped within water that evaporated from the surface of the various bodies of water on earth, and then made its way up to the upper reaches of the ionosphere, where the ISS passed through it, causing the plankton to be deposited upon the ISS.

It's all very reasonable.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (5, Interesting)

wkk2 (808881) | about 2 months ago | (#47707395)

If plankton was taken to the ISS via an updraft and it's viable (survived the delta V of impact). It would seem likely that impacts with passing objects that are above escape velocity could also occur. If that's true, plankton might be found all over the solar system.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (4, Funny)

evilviper (135110) | about 2 months ago | (#47708437)

If that's true, plankton might be found all over the solar system.

"My God! It's full of plankton!"

They may be the "dark matter" we've been searching for.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709841)

How wonder what % of /.-ers got the reference?

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709573)

survived the delta V of impact

Have you never heard of the cube-square law? The delta V of impact is nothing to worry about for microscopic things that don't have internal organs.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

BigMike (122378) | about 2 months ago | (#47710023)

And the universe says "thanks for all the fish"

If plankton was taken to the ISS via an updraft and it's viable (survived the delta V of impact). It would seem likely that impacts with passing objects that are above escape velocity could also occur. If that's true, plankton might be found all over the solar system.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

Sowelu (713889) | about 2 months ago | (#47707541)

I would expect it's more likely that it picked the stuff up during launch. Water vapor in the air at low altitudes?

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 2 months ago | (#47707575)

...and survive the very high temperatures caused by air friction on the way up?

Re: This actually makes perfect sense. (2)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 months ago | (#47707647)

Shielded in the capsule holding components of the ISS? Why not? The ISS parts weren't traveling in a vacuum, and given humid, balmy, oceanfront Cape Canaveral, seems reasonable to me that their might have been some air exchange or air captured.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47710687)

and survive the very high temperatures caused by air friction on the way up

The vast majority of heating encountered by something flying through the atmosphere is due to compression of the air immediately ahead of it, not friction. Additionally, there's not nearly as much heating encountered during ascent as during re-entry.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (4, Insightful)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 2 months ago | (#47707687)

Are you suggesting that a freak occurrence like a sea breeze may be occurring at a coastal location like Cape Canaveral, Florida? And that it may have even reached as far inland as the VAB [wikipedia.org] , which is where the ISS capsule would have been loaded into the shuttle's cargo bay? And that the VAB, which has the largest doors anywhere in the world so that fully-loaded space vehicles can be carried out on the crawler transporter [wikipedia.org] in one piece, may have allowed such contaminated air to get inside?

Absurdity and nonsense! Surely they would've planned for something like that!

Which is all to say, I quite agree with you, since it seems like the most obvious time and place that sea life could have been deposited on any of the equipment. After all, they spend days or weeks inside the VAB, which is one of the largest buildings by volume in the world. So large, in fact, that rain clouds have formed inside, and that water has to come from somewhere...such as the nearby ocean water that contains plankton.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (4, Informative)

trout007 (975317) | about 2 months ago | (#47708775)

Actually nothing is loaded into the payload bay in the VAB. That is just where the stack was built up. The ISS payload were installed in the Payload Changeout Room (PCR) on the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) while the shuttle is actually on the Pad. This allows a later integration for the payloads and allows access to them late in the process.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pa... [nasa.gov]

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 2 months ago | (#47709259)

Wow. I had no idea. That is really cool.

Now I'm wondering where I got it in my head that the orbiter was fully-loaded when it was placed on the crawler, since I could've sworn I had heard that. Well, regardless, it appears I either heard wrong or am misremembering. This is one of those times that I absolutely relish being corrected, since I get to learn something neat. Thanks!

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

trout007 (975317) | about 2 months ago | (#47709413)

There were a few horizontally integrated payloads but those were integrated in the Orbiter Process Facility (OPF) which is basically the hangar.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

zb84 (3791859) | about 2 months ago | (#47712129)

...Cape Canaveral? This is ROS segment module, Baikonur is far, far away from sea.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about 2 months ago | (#47707721)

I would expect it's more likely that it picked the stuff up during launch. Water vapor in the air at low altitudes?

Yeah, or perhaps more likely: water droplets carried by the wind inside the bay where they loaded the space station module into the shuttle.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 months ago | (#47710751)

Yeah, given that launch sites tend to be on coastal areas.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 2 months ago | (#47707865)

What also makes perfect sense is that the equipment used to do the collection and detection wasn't as clean as they had hoped. I seem to recall this happened with some meteorites at some point. Contamination is always a factor when dealing with microorganisms.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (3, Informative)

hey! (33014) | about 2 months ago | (#47708377)

Except water vapor is the gaseous form of water; the plankton would have to be transported on individual molecules of water to reach the ionosphere.

If plankton were transportable in microscopic *droplets* in the troposphere as you suggest, a more plausible explanation is that the equipment was contaminated -- both the station itself and the gear used to test it.

Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47711117)

What are evaporated water droplets? I thought when water evaporates it becomes a gas, not droplets with plankton in them.

It came from Bikini Bottom (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707327)

Krabs must have caught him trying to steal the Krabby Patty formula again.

I know how it got up there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707355)

Kim Dotcom busted a sick cannonball off his yacht.

Life came from space (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707361)

Life came from space to Earth in a moon sized ball of water. It evolved and developed in that water long before it hit Earth, and that impact created our Moon.

Easy explanation (2)

Bodhammer (559311) | about 2 months ago | (#47707405)

Plankton on the ISS happens the same way SpongeBob and Patrick can build a campfire in Bikini Bottom. (in fact, there is a cosmic connection between the two)

Re:Easy explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708089)

HUR HUR!!! It's a science article everyone, watch me make a dumb fucking retarded fucked up shit-for-brains joke.

Shocked I tell you...shocked! (3, Insightful)

djupedal (584558) | about 2 months ago | (#47707407)

Terrestrial materials found on object made of terrestrial materials.

Hitchhiker's explanation (1)

Mostly a lurker (634878) | about 2 months ago | (#47707425)

Presumably, someone has been using the infinite improbability drive.

Re:Hitchhiker's explanation (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 2 months ago | (#47709013)

No, that's only if they find a whale and a bowl of petunias near the ISS.

we are paying it forward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707487)

and returning life to another world though with interest it really should be a multicellular organism we send. Don't we have any spare politicians lying around?

Are all summaries to be in pseudo-English now? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 months ago | (#47707489)

Could someone not have tidied up this summary just a little?

Re:Are all summaries to be in pseudo-English now? (1)

gargleblast (683147) | about 2 months ago | (#47708661)

Many could. But Slashdot editors aren't exactly gunning for the Pulitzer.

Re: Are all summaries to be in pseudo-English now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709635)

What's the name of the "Pulitzer" for fifth graders?

What's next... Celestial whales (3, Funny)

Zondar (32904) | about 2 months ago | (#47707505)

licking the hull of the ISS for nutrition?

Re:What's next... Celestial whales (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708613)

No, that's in a few hundred years when "Star Trek, The Voyage Home" come true.

Next up, barnacles (2)

AbrasiveCat (999190) | about 2 months ago | (#47707605)

First plankton, and you know what eats plankton, barnacles. I wouldn't want to have to scrape down the ISS. No wonder they are talking about abandoning the ISS in a few years.

Re:Next up, barnacles (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 2 months ago | (#47707881)

They just need to send someone out there to coat the ISS in some toxic chemicals, same as boats. So that the plankton can become resistant to toxic chemicals as well as extreme weather conditions.

Re:Next up, barnacles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47710007)

They just need to send someone out there to coat the ISS in some toxic chemicals, same as boats. So that the plankton can become resistant to toxic chemicals as well as extreme weather conditions.

Is this a bad thing? Create some biological shell that is resistant to all of the things that can hurt humans/equipment in space. Preferably something that can go dormant when there is nothing to eat, but will regenerate/grow when fed through the skin of the station. You now have a regenerating protective outer shell.

The main issue with this approach is it could potentially impair heat removal from the station. Of course there is also the whole introducing non-native life to a pristine habitat, things could get out of control. Of course Monsanto will be the first to achieve something like this.

Meanwhile (1)

linear a (584575) | about 2 months ago | (#47707607)

Meanwhile. The samples of the Titanic I've been analyzing seem to have been exposed to hard vacuum and solar wind erosion.

So, now it's official then. There's life out there (1)

chaosdivine69 (1456649) | about 2 months ago | (#47707613)

And just like that...life, living outside special suits and man made mechanical devices has spread from our planet. If there wasn't life in outer space before, besides ours (which I think is highly unlikely anyhow since space is so vast), there is now! Well done mankind on the beginnings of teraforming!

not hard cosmic radiation (3, Informative)

slew (2918) | about 2 months ago | (#47707659)

AFAIK, the ISS is still inside the van allen belt which means it isn't even subject to medium-level of cosmic radiation (experienced by the Apollo missions), yet alone hard cosmic interstellar radiation (when you get out into Voyager distances)...

Re:not hard cosmic radiation (2)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 months ago | (#47707895)

Yes and no-- Depends on what the ISS's orbit is. If it has a circumpolar orbit, (crosses the polar region), then it will pass through the magnetic field lines that funnel cosmic particles into the atmosphere that cause the northern lights. EG-- it would get beamed pretty intensely with concentrated cosmic particles.

If it does not have that kind of orbit, and instead stays around the equator, then no so much. Mostly radiation free, compared to outside the magnetosphere.

What we need to do, is send a lander to the moon loaded with some microbial and planktonic colonies, where it can get beamed by high intensity, raw solar wind radiation, (And more importantly, where we can keep close tabs on it easily) and measure how the colonies do over time.

Last I checked, we have pretty much definitively determined that the moon is devoid of native flora or fauna. "Contamination" of the moon is a silly prospect.

If we decide not to land the experiment ON the moon, we could just as easily place it in orbit around the moon, and still conduct the experiment. the moon just provides a nice stable gravity well to moor the experiment so we dont have to send oodles of fuel to keep station, which is conveniently close by, and outside the magnetosphere of the planet.

I am actually surprised that there are so few experiments geared at empirically testing terrestrial microorganisms against the "Inhospitable environment" of space.

I strongly suspect it has more to do with the politics of not having to contemplate panspermia as a probable/reasonable factor in scientific debate than anything else.

Re:not hard cosmic radiation (3, Informative)

slew (2918) | about 2 months ago | (#47708171)

Yes and no-- Depends on what the ISS's orbit is. If it has a circumpolar orbit, (crosses the polar region), then it will pass through the magnetic field lines that funnel cosmic particles into the atmosphere that cause the northern lights. EG-- it would get beamed pretty intensely with concentrated cosmic particles.

If it does not have that kind of orbit, and instead stays around the equator, then no so much. Mostly radiation free, compared to outside the magnetosphere.

ISS orbit track here [isstracker.com] ... Quite equatorial...

What we need to do, is send a lander to the moon loaded with some microbial and planktonic colonies, where it can get beamed by high intensity, raw solar wind radiation, (And more importantly, where we can keep close tabs on it easily) and measure how the colonies do over time.

Accidentally did that [nasa.gov] back in '67 with Surveyor 3 [wikipedia.org] ...

The 50-100 organisms survived launch, space vacuum, 3 years of radiation exposure, deep-freeze at an average temperature of only 20 degrees above absolute zero, and no nutrient, water or energy source. (The United States landed 5 Surveyors on the Moon; Surveyor 3 was the only one of the Surveyors visited by any of the six Apollo landings. No other life forms were found in soil samples retrieved by the Apollo missions or by two Soviet unmanned sampling missions, although amino acids - not necessarily of biological origin - were found in soil retrieved by the Apollo astronauts.)

Re:not hard cosmic radiation (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 months ago | (#47710769)

Plenty of biological material was left on the surface in jettison bags during the apollo missions. Its going to be interesting when those bags get retrieved. In fact I wonder if it justifies a sample return mission right now.

Re:not hard cosmic radiation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47710475)

Actually, it's only the soft component of cosmic radiation, including solar energetic particles, that gets deflected by the earth's magnetic field and accumulates in the Van Allen belts. The hard component - higher-energy cosmic rays - punch straight through the magnetic field, and interact in the upper atmosphere. They get down low enough to increase your radiation exposure when you're on a passenger flight, so they're definitely passing through the altitude range where the ISS orbits.

Proposed Experiment (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707705)

we're planning to go to mars in a few years, right? so let's go ahead and send a probe full of micro-organisms to mars. when we get there in a few years, check the landing site to see how they are doing. if we end up not going there (in person), red rover, red rover, send curiosity right over.

Dear Mr. Krabs, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47707899)

Please be aware that the krabby patty recipe is not necessarily secure in space.

Yours Truly,
Spongebob

He's just looking (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47707979)

for a second location for the Chum Bucket.

Plankton? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 months ago | (#47708009)

Plinktun on the ISS? It's beached as bro.

Question (1)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about 2 months ago | (#47708065)

Does this make proving "there is no whale on this spaceship" harder, or doesn't it?

I suspect the Japanese (1)

mbone (558574) | about 2 months ago | (#47708125)

I suspect the Japanese, and specifically the Japanese resupply modules (and that is not a joke). They are launched near the coast from a culture that makes extensive use of sea-weed; either way there could be contamination with sea plankton.

The idea that plankton could drift by itself up to orbital regions is... interesting. The idea that it could survive a 7 km/sec impact with Station is not; I don't think that is viable on either sense of the term.

Re:I suspect the Japanese (2)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 2 months ago | (#47708409)

Actually they were launched from the coast and from the culture of Florida, like all the other non-Russian modules:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K... [wikipedia.org]

Re:I suspect the Japanese (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47708511)

I agree: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Green_Slime [wikipedia.org] ...shot in Japan at the studios of Toei Company by director Kinji Fukasaku.

Call Dr. Jeremy Stone... (1)

jpellino (202698) | about 2 months ago | (#47708175)

he knows what to do with stuff that hitchhikes on spacecraft.

Call out the Wildfire team and Michael Crichton (1)

nicoleb_x (1571029) | about 2 months ago | (#47708755)

I guess this isn't exactly The Andromeda Strain (1969), by Michael Crichton, but it was my first thought.

Re:Call out the Wildfire team and Michael Crichton (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709023)

Christ, I had to scroll to the fucking bottom to find an Andromeda Strain reference. Awesome book. Reading it made me realize I know less than jack shit about human physiology (and I read tons of stuff).

Re:Call out the Wildfire team and Michael Crichton (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 months ago | (#47710777)

Lets hope it doesn't start by attacking rubber seals.

Dirty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47709109)

Earth is a very dirty place.

Even the Oceans of Earth can launch spores into space.

Something that NASA cannot do.

ISS is just moping up the spores the Oceans Launch !

Planet Earth poses a danger to the Cosmos ! Viral Infections on a Cosmic Scale !

Annihilate it !

Te he he

Obligatory (1)

clovis (4684) | about 2 months ago | (#47709231)

I, for one, welcome our new planktonic overlords.

Re:Obligatory (1)

Necroloth (1512791) | about 2 months ago | (#47712181)

the feeling is... planktonic

Strange (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about 2 months ago | (#47710661)

Where could that come from? I would understand it if the rockets or shuttles docking up there would start near the ocean, let's say Florida, but hey, I'm no marine biologist, that's a job for George Costanza.

Russian conspiracy for our bodily fluids. (1)

Imazalil (553163) | about 2 months ago | (#47711763)

Don't trust the Russians. They're after our bodily fluids, this is just the first step. Alien plankton on ISS found... plankton also in sea... sea water evaporates... all water is contaminated. There's a reason they only drink vodka.

-- dammit, I can't think of an actual quote from the movie.

At least it wasn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47711833)

Mynocks...those thins love to chew on the power cables.

Dubious source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47711845)

Ok, given Russia's recent resurgence in the propoganda market, I am going to give this finding a grain of salt until someone else publishes ... outside of Russia!

Nightmare at 20,000 Kilometres (1)

Dabido (802599) | about 2 months ago | (#47713111)

Several surveys proved that these organisms can even develop.

*looks out window* I think I can see something on the solar panel ...

This was suggested when I was in high school.... (1)

markhb (11721) | about 2 months ago | (#47715007)

"There are those who believe that life here, began out there...." -- Battlestar Galactica

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