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Polymer-Based Graphene Substitute Is Easy To Mass-Produce

Soulskill posted about 5 months ago | from the set-off-some-graphene-fireworks-to-celebrate dept.

Science 37

Zothecula writes: For all the attention graphene gets thanks to its impressive list of properties, how many of us have actually encountered it in anything other than its raw graphite form? Show of hands. No-one? That's because it is still difficult to mass-produce without introducing defects. Now a team at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology has developed a graphene substitute from plastic that offers the benefits of graphene for use in solar cells and semiconductor chips, but is easy to mass-produce (abstract).

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substitute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47384045)

That implies graphene is presently used for anything... It's just vaporware.

Re:substitute? (1, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384093)

graphene has been used for over a century, stacked and bonded in pencils

Re:substitute? (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 5 months ago | (#47384107)

That would be graphITE [wikipedia.org]

Re:substitute? (1)

tomxor (2379126) | about 5 months ago | (#47384113)

beat me to it :P

Re:substitute? (2)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384913)

and you would have been wrong. graphite is nothing more than stacked and bonded graphene sheets

Re:substitute? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47384159)

Whoosh.

Wiki [wikipedia.org] :

Crystalline flake graphite (or flake graphite for short) occurs as isolated, flat, plate-like particles with hexagonal edges if unbroken and when broken the edges can be irregular or angular;

stacked and bonded

Wiki [wikipedia.org] :

In graphene, carbon atoms are densely packed in a regular sp2-bonded atomic-scale chicken wire (hexagonal) pattern.

Re:substitute? (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 5 months ago | (#47384243)

But the stuff in pencils still ins't graphene.

Re:substitute? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47384563)

At first you missed the joke, now you're just being pedantic. I know, I know, someone on the Internet was wrong.

Re:substitute? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384909)

yes it is, it is graphene bonded and stacked, look it up. that is the reason pencils can write, by the way

Re:substitute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47385589)

no its not, look it up and use your head!

If its 'stacked and bonded' that does not make it a single layer. Graphene *by definition* is a 2D sheet of carbon atoms, the stuff in pencils is a 3D matrix of carbon atoms. In no way,shape or form does 3D equal 2D.

Please, stop posting drivel when you are so very much wrong.

Re:substitute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47386571)

You're an idiot.

How to make graphene with a pencil and tape

https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Re:substitute? (1)

Zerth (26112) | about 5 months ago | (#47386597)

Considering the 2010 Nobel prize in physics was won by a pair who made grapheme by simply cleaving graphite with tape, I'd say you really need to use your head.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-... [ieee.org]

Re: substitute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47387035)

How could it be a 2D sheet by definition? Last time I checked it had at least 1 atom depth! Which make it 3D.

Re:substitute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47387407)

Not to agree with any of ye, but 2D does equal 3D.. if "stacked". Where the 3rd "D" is the direction of stacking. Don't be a fool.

Re:substitute? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384903)

which is graphene bonded and stacked

Re:substitute? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47384407)

Again with your asinine fuckwitted nonsense.

Re:substitute? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384949)

That's rich coming from an AC who can't form a complete sentence.

What could be easier than pencils and Scotch tape? (1)

drwho (4190) | about 5 months ago | (#47384119)

I mean, really...

Re:What could be easier than pencils and Scotch ta (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 5 months ago | (#47384149)

While cheap and easy, that's not overly suited for mass production.

Re:What could be easier than pencils and Scotch ta (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 5 months ago | (#47384287)

While cheap and easy, that's not overly suited for mass production.

I'm sure 3M could work something out....

Re:What could be easier than pencils and Scotch ta (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 5 months ago | (#47385535)

I have worked with 3M on custom adhesive tapes . I have doubts about that some days.

Cheaper Solar Cells ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47384219)

Yeah !!!!

Sorry if you live in Florida...

Re:Cheaper Solar Cells ! (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 5 months ago | (#47384351)

Patent to be purchased by fossil fuel company in 3,2,1...

Ahem (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 5 months ago | (#47384463)

Let me know when it's mass-produced.

So what exactly are the properties? (1)

Baldrson (78598) | about 5 months ago | (#47384587)

They don't say it has _all_ the properties of defect-free graphene -- so, what properties are mismatched? Just the important ones?

Re:So what exactly are the properties? (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 5 months ago | (#47384685)

Yes. I hyped myself about capacitors good enough to replace batteries, and graphene is good for that use. No idea if the substitute is any useful there.

I have used some (1, Redundant)

penguinoid (724646) | about 5 months ago | (#47384749)

I regularly use graphene stacked in several layers so that the layers can slide off each other, with a little clay mixed in for harness. I use it to produce flexible, resilient optical communications devices that can be folded like paper, with a longer lifetime than most magnetic or charge-based storage devices.

Re:I have used some (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384927)

they should come up with a cool name for your marvelous device, like a pensyllabuscil

Confusing article (3, Informative)

marciot (598356) | about 5 months ago | (#47384759)

Is the end result graphene, a lattice of carbon atoms, or not? What exactly is a "substitute carbon nanosheet" if not graphene itself? Is the process new or the material new? This article is like saying you developed an easier process for creating wood-pulp-based white laminar sheets that are flexible and suitable for writing letters and calling it a "paper substitute", without clearly saying why it isn't paper.

Re:Confusing article (2)

radtea (464814) | about 5 months ago | (#47384877)

What exactly is a "substitute carbon nanosheet"

Reading between the lines, it looks like it is a thin layer of mixed carbon and hydrogen with a structure that they have not yet properly characterized but which they have shown has the properties required for transparent electrodes in solar cells.

Specifically, they say the properties of the layer can be controlled by the properties of the polymer they start with, which suggests that it partakes in the polymer's nature, which would mean it is more than just a single layer of carbon atoms.

They may be being cautious and simply saying it is "graphene-like-enough" for this application, but having not fully characterized it may not want to claim it is "truly" graphene, which is a fairly vague term for a variety of single-sheet carbon materials that may have a variety of defects, in just the same was as "paper" is also fairly vague (from tissue to construction.)

Re:Confusing article (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#47384937)

if bonded there is a name for mixed carbon and hydrogen in a mostly carbon matrix, coal

Re:Confusing article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47387257)

My thoughts pretty much exactly. Claiming that whatever they've produced has "properties similar to graphine" leaves a lot of wiggle room. Sounds a little like KST's PR department has decided the institution needs a little air time.

Re:Confusing article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47389463)

The abstract says that the CNS is made of a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons and cycloalkenes that have been spin coated on a quartz substrate then heat treated.

Re:Confusing article (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 5 months ago | (#47390191)

Is the end result graphene, a lattice of carbon atoms, or not? What exactly is a "substitute carbon nanosheet" if not graphene itself?

It sounds to me like they're hedging because they haven't fully characterized what they get.

As I undetstand it, producing carbon fiber from plastic consists of stretching a plastic (such as rayon - a string of carbon hexagons joined by oxygen links, or polyacriolnitrile - a carbon backbone with a C2N group hanging off every other carbon) so the long-chains are alligned, then baking off the other elements (hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen). This leaves just the carbon backbones (with additional carbon-carbon bonds from the loss of the hydrogen and whatever. Result: long, narrow, straight or crumpled ribbons of graphite-like hexagons, in a bundle, perhaps with occasional crosslinks, side-bumps, and other debris.

So I'd think that, if they did this on a surface, with something that didn't polmerize in two dimensions, they wouldn't end up with the nice, clean, carbon chicken-wire fence of graphine. Instead they'd end up with little graphine patches and strips, interconnected irregularly, and not restricted to an atom-thick plane.

But I'd expect the result to, like graphene, conduct well and be very strong. Just not as strong and conductive as a perfect graphene layer, perhaps with some odd electrical activity from the deviations from the regular structure acting as "impurities', and higher resistance due to shorter mean free paths for charge carriers as they bump into these irregularities.

This was on Gizmag yesterday... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47385789)

... like many of Slashdot's articles...

Slashdot is not generally a primary source. (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 5 months ago | (#47390235)

This was on Gizmag yesterday... like many of Slashdot's articles...

Give it a rest.

Slashdot is not an investigative journal or a follower-and-repeater of press releases. It's a bunch of nerds pointing out interesting stuff to each other, and talking it over, with a few nerds vetting the postings before they go up on the "front page".

That means, like Wikipedia, it's not generally a primary source. It also means that, for real news items, it is generally about a day behind.

If you want news in a timely fashion, go read Gizmag and a bunch of other acutal reportage sites. If you're willing to wait a little bit and then talk it over with a crowd of acquaintences (some of whom might actually know more about it than the newsies), this is the place for you.

Yaritza M (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47386373)

I prefer Led Lampen [cm3-shop.de] to those

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