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India Launches Five Foreign Satellites

Soulskill posted about 3 months ago | from the high-five dept.

Space 85

vasanth writes: "India has put into orbit five foreign satellites, including one built by France two from Canada and one each from Singapore and Germany. The PSLV (Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle) has so far successfully launched 67 satellites, including 40 foreign ones, into space. The PSLV costs about 17 million USD and the cost is seen as a major advantage India has over other countries in terms of commercial launches. When talking about the cost of the project, the Prime Minister of India noted that the launch was cheaper than Hollywood film Gravity.

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They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (-1, Offtopic)

jimmydevice (699057) | about 3 months ago | (#47366407)

Well, they seem to have a robust space program, Much better then the USA. Why are we importing foreign talent, since there is so much underutilized here? I forget, Oh, Greed...

Re:They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (1, Troll)

Cryacin (657549) | about 3 months ago | (#47366415)

When talking about the cost of the project,

They noted an innovative technology stack to launch the satellites. When asked what the major challenges were, Anil Gupta, chief scientist responded that getting the rubber band stretched far enough without breaking was, although common, still very challenging.

Re:They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366511)

Isn't the fact that they are better a good reason to import them? So that they can teach how to do?
I'd rather have some foreigners who can make a space program out of whatever is given to NASA than to just keep under-utilizing the small budged they have with only American talent.

US should import the brains instead of banning ! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366517)

Instead of banning them USA should import the brainy Indians --- I mean, look at the cost of NASA launching one FREAKING satellite versus those that were launched from India

If India could do it so cheaply, why can't USA ?

What is fucking wrong with the United States of America these days ?

Mod parent up ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366871)

Mod parent up !

Unlike other comments in this thread, the parent comment makes the most sense.

Re:US should import the brains instead of banning (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 3 months ago | (#47368387)

To be honest, PSLV is cheap in absolute terms, but it's not exactly the pinnacle of payload weight. SpaceX asks for $56M for Falcon 9 v1.1 (as opposed to $15M for a PSLV launch) that can carry about four times as much payload to LEO, which makes Falcon 9 actually a few percent cheaper.

Re:They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366597)

H1B are tiny fraction of the IT workforce. It is not greed. The Westerners colonizing America, taking away the lives and land of the natives is greed. The Westerners colonizing Africa is greed. The Westerners colonizing India for its wealth of natural resources is greed. If at all, the these colonizations had beneficial side effects, that was not intended in the first place.Loot of the wealth of other nations was the intention.

Re:They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367003)

Nice to see the inconvenient truth being modded Offtopic...

Re:They seem to be doing good, Ban H1B (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 3 months ago | (#47367975)

Well, I guess they actually care about getting things done, instead of posturing before the whole world as "the greatest nation on earth". Actually doing things works a lot better than to rely on past glory.

Jobs more important than cheap shit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366417)

Tariff the bastards. Lopsided trade will kick the US both in the job sack and the financial bubble sack. We've tried lopsided trade for 3 decades and it has only resulted in inequality, ugly bubbles, and high unemployment. Let's try balanced trade for a while. Worth a shot. We are a big experiment anyhow.

Re:Jobs more important than cheap shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47368213)

The world is getting more and more equal all the time. Competition is working!

Re:Jobs more important than cheap shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47368847)

When it gets down to it — talking trade balances here — once we've brain-drained all our technology into other countries, once things have evened out, they're making cars in Bolivia and microwave ovens in Tadzhikistan and selling them here — once our edge in natural resources has been made irrelevant by giant Hong Kong ships and dirigibles that can ship North Dakota all the way to New Zealand for a nickel — once the Invisible Hand has taken away all those historical inequities and smeared them out into a broad global layer of what a Pakistani brickmaker would consider to be prosperity — y'know what? There's only four things we [the former United States] do better than anyone else:

music
movies
microcode (software)
high-speed pizza delivery


.

Manned mission please... (4, Insightful)

monzie (729782) | about 3 months ago | (#47366433)

ISRO ( Indian Space Research Organization ) launch vehicles have attained the goals set for them. A politician recently pointed out that cost of sending 5 satellites to space was less than the budget of the movie Gravity ( I liked that movie, he should have picked Avatar for the example IMO ). The Mangalyaan ( Mars Mission ) costs less than â12 per km travelled, making it the most cost effective mars mission ever. These launches were done by the PSLV ( Polar satellite launch vehicle ) and cannot be used for manned launches. ISRO has suffered setbacks , notably with GSLV ( Geostationary satellite launch vehicle ) and in mastering the cryogenic engine. They have made progress and their track record makes them a very good contender to provide a good alternative to SpaceX.

Re: Manned mission please... (1)

monzie (729782) | about 3 months ago | (#47366439)

That was "12 Rupees per km". Slashdot did something weird with the Rupee symbol.

Re: Manned mission please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47368029)

We have time and money to implement the beta but not Unicode support.

Re: Manned mission please... (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 3 months ago | (#47370641)

The reason is not technical as far as I know.
I remember reading that Slashdot tried it a billion years ago, even - but I'm not sure about that.
If you give every possible Unicode character available to anyone you get svatiskas, unwarranted impersonations by abusing nearly identical characters, and at the least Unicode goatse.

Re: Manned mission please... (1)

jandrese (485) | about 3 months ago | (#47370987)

Even more fun was when people entered the Unicode character that reverses the following text on the page.

That said, sanitizing problematic characters seems like a far more reasonable solution than throwing the baby out with the bathwater because Unicode is scary.

HTML representation of foreign symbols on /. (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 3 months ago | (#47378759)

The rupee symbol has an HTML representation 8377 or &#8377. Even if /. doesn't want to support Unicode, can't it at least support the HTML representations that are there, so that people using that can represent foreign currencies or other symbols?

Manned mission please... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366473)

That was true until the GSAT-14 launch. Those guys have talked about their commitment to delivering a better GSLV Mark III, so it'll be awaited.

Technically, it doesn't make too much sense to send a human being as much as it makes to send a robotic creature down there. It's the same reason we use Drones and Surgical Arms. :-)

Perhaps we may require humans on a space station if Robots can't handle certain sensing tasks too well. But that's pretty much the scope of human beings out there. What we could really benefit from is actually better satellite communication and reliable remote assignments with a 5 minute purview.

Re:Manned mission please... (1)

cmarkn (31706) | about 3 months ago | (#47372517)

The reason you need people in space is that people adapt, improvise and overcome obstacles when things go wrong, and Murphy rides on every mission. Look at Apollo 13. Because there were people on that spacecraft, they were able to complete the minimum mission, getting themselves home alive. Of course if this had it been two robotic vehicles, we could have just said they're only robots and let them fly away like the Voyagers. The point is that people adapt. Look at the Mars Exploration Rovers. They are running down as they collect dust on their solar cells. If there were people driving around there, they'd tear the cover off one of their procedures manual and tape it together to make fenders to keep the dust from being thrown up by the wheels, and they'd simply brush off what did collect.

And there's another reason people must go into space. Look at what Ender was able to do to the Formics in the movie because they put all their eggs in one basket, never leaving their homeworld. All it takes is one massive collision or one alien invasion and we're done.

Great for India (5, Interesting)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 months ago | (#47366449)

They studied hard and ensured they fully understood every aspect of basic satellite lunch systems domestically before moving to the next stage.
Other nations used military funding, the private sector, other governments and imports to try and boost their own domestic projects.
So many failed as the cash needed never could make up for what India fully understood from the 1960's: its about not getting ahead of your own domestic science.
Now India can enjoy lower cost launch systems without needing any other nations help, costly imports or permission.
"Indian Space Research Organisation"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

Re:Great for India (-1, Flamebait)

epyT-R (613989) | about 3 months ago | (#47366475)

They still had to study the work of others who pioneered it, based on military funding. ..and they still can't clean up their garbage, their sewage, or feed, house, and clothe 90% of their population. They can't even keep the power grid they do have up and running reliably.

Look, north korea has rockets too, and they're in even worse shape.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366483)

"They can't even keep the power grid they do have up and running reliably."

For the same reasons the US can't stop borrowing money, can't have simpler taxation systems, can't tax the rich, can't fix healthcare, can't pay government workers. The day US actually resolves its internal problems, i'll start listening to your bitchin'

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366507)

Its not a matter of resolving things, its a matter of getting things to a point where its reasonably acceptable to ignore. No one gives a damned about paying government workers because when push comes to shove, they get paid regardless. They might get paid late, but they'll get paid.

A power grid that can't be kept up reliably? That's not something customers want to see when you're trying to convince them to let you launch multi-million dollar pieces of equipment up into space.

Re:Great for India (1)

jma05 (897351) | about 3 months ago | (#47366971)

> A power grid that can't be kept up reliably? That's not something customers want to see when you're trying to convince them to let you launch multi-million dollar pieces of equipment up into space.

Wanna bet? Go to Indian forums and try to find people complaining that no space projects should go on until they get uninterrupted power supply.

Don't do space projects that get us (or help get in near future) profits in foreign exchange said no Indian ever.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47368477)

> A power grid that can't be kept up reliably? That's not something customers want to see when you're trying to convince them to let you launch multi-million dollar pieces of equipment up into space

Keeping the power grid reliable and providing 24/7 power is more of a political and subsidy problem than technical or financial one. Power is under control of the state and each state's power board subsidizes electricity prices thoroughly and always runs in losses, without a care for better infrastructure or future planning.

And no one can touch this because, you have to increase electricity prices which is a no go.

Re:Great for India (1)

cmarkn (31706) | about 3 months ago | (#47372587)

Power is under control of the state and each state's power board subsidizes electricity prices thoroughly and always runs in losses, without a care for better infrastructure or future planning.

This is simply not true at all. There is at least one state, Texas, where electricity prices are set by the companies that generate power and the companies that deliver it. Remarkably, those companies have built capacity as it is needed including wind and hydro sources, and all the while made a profit. Sorry to hear how inefficiently your state is run.

Re:Great for India (1)

jma05 (897351) | about 3 months ago | (#47375671)

He is talking about states in India, not US.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47373285)

Go to Indian forums and try to find people complaining that no space projects should go on until they get uninterrupted power supply.

I went to some Indian forums, but the only people who had posted were the ones who had electricity.

Re:Great for India (1)

jma05 (897351) | about 3 months ago | (#47375647)

Jokes aside, many Indians just use laptops and 3G data cards which have quite cheap and affordable plans compared to US (start at $2 a month). So power cuts don't really effect computer use. If you are middle class in India, you probably might also have battery backup or a generator subscription for the house essentials.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47378791)

Internet access in India i.e. Broadband access currently has data caps, which is not the case here in the US (I have TWC), and the caps there are ridiculously low, compared to here. Yeah, cellular carriers here have data caps, but the cellular carriers there are far more expensive if you try shifting data. Oh, and there, you don't have 4G cellular connections as yet: Airtel, the one company that offers 4G, only offers 4G dongles for use w/ laptops, not 4G data connections that cellphones can use.

Re:Great for India (1)

jma05 (897351) | about 3 months ago | (#47382409)

True. Indian Internet is not great for heavy media usage. It is quite adequate for posting to "forums" the OP was talking about.

The broadband plans I have seen have x speed, a relatively low cap, but an unlimited x/2 speed hence after. Not too bad. The cheapest broadband I have seen is 1 mbps for $8, 20 GB cap, further usage is unlimited at 512 kbps. I don't recall what the more expensive plans offer. Low-cost, lower-tier alternatives are more important for India. India's primary concern ATM is access, not throughput. The speeds and caps are not show stoppers for most part. HD Video and game services like Steam (or even plain game consoles) won't take off in this environment, but everything else should be fine.

Re:Great for India (2)

Rich0 (548339) | about 3 months ago | (#47367043)

A power grid that can't be kept up reliably? That's not something customers want to see when you're trying to convince them to let you launch multi-million dollar pieces of equipment up into space.

Their customers don't care as long as the launch facility can operate when the locals are in darkness. Companies have figured out that by operating in the third world they can still have first-world conditions in their manufacturing facilities when it improves efficiency, but not have to pay for their employees or the rest of the country to have it when they go home. If you operate in the US you have to pay all kinds of taxes (or pay employees who have to be able to afford taxes) so that the city streets aren't covered in garbage. From a pure productivity standpoint it is much cheaper to only pay to remove garbage from areas where it could actually interfere with whatever work you're getting done.

Re:Great for India (-1, Flamebait)

epyT-R (613989) | about 3 months ago | (#47366593)

Well, yeah, that's right. the US isn't perfect either. So why should india be lauded for launching rockets? Maybe we can agree that judging a country based on its rocket launching ability isn't a very good metric. Please read the post I responded to for context.

It's borrowing money to pay for that social(ist?) healthcare, and pay government workers wages that contradict the market. Perhaps a 10% state that focuses on what it's supposed to, coupled with the principal benefactors of corporate welfare paying back what was given to them would help.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366689)

Rockets are the exception than the rule in India. They certainly have been able to launch multiple satellites more reliably into space than most other space programs have. If that indigenous attitude made it into every other bit of India, that's what they require to solve their problems.

Let's talk about reliable power sources, for instance - for long, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (the US) had kept embargos on sending fuel to India. The US has itself intervened by paying out activist groups on starting nuclear reactors in India, because they were supplied by Russia. The US has also intervened in two other neighbors of India, driving them into war and jerking off into their economies.

India is much more peaceful and a trustworthy citizen than the US has ever been. As soon as they get rid of doing businesses with the US, India's power grids will improve. It should also sort out the "cheap" "skilled" H1 problem.

Re:Great for India (2, Insightful)

nashv (1479253) | about 3 months ago | (#47367039)

No one was judging a country based on their rocket launching capability. People were appreiciating the efficient and economic rocket launching capability and the efforts that went into developing it. You are one who is doing the judging of an entire country, rather than just the particular achievement reported posted in the article.

As for all the problems you describe as being present in India, as an Indian I thank you for your concern. But seeing as you aren't doing that much to help us solve them, you can keep this list of what is wrong with yourself. We already have that list for the last 60 years.

Re:Great for India (2)

AikonMGB (1013995) | about 3 months ago | (#47367665)

Further, this is a high-technology field in which India can excel and become a prominent provider. This brings national prestige, foreign investment and support, provides (some) high-value jobs, and fosters better education. No, it's not going to solve India's problems over night, but it can help.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47372385)

But India needs to address core issues of lack of urban planning. Corruption in municipalities is so high that they give building permit to anyone who bribes any official. This leads to poor distribution of utilities (electricity, water etc), improper waste disposal and generally poor civic amenities. If the open sewage problem is solved, clean h2o problem will also be solved to a large extent.

In the 21st century, not providing clean h2o, waste management and reliable electricity to its citizens should cause the govt to hang its head in shame and they should make it #1 priority, PERIOD.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366497)

North Korea doesn't have a space program. I have rockets.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366515)

On the bright side, there status as satellite launcher upper can be a source of reliable income, albiet limited.

Re:Great for India (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 months ago | (#47366523)

Re "They still had to study the work of others who pioneered it, based on military funding."
The UK tried that with Skynet (satellite) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org] They had to use U.S. assets and that was very interesting for the UK during the Falklands War.

Re:Great for India (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 3 months ago | (#47366729)

Actually the UK (well the government---and all major parties are pretty muich indistinguishable in this regard as well as others) do this but with an extra flourish.

First they have the expense of funding the development of a home grown system. This usually works becuase the UK has a large economy, good education, first world logistics and etc.

The someone decides it's "cheaper to buy from America" so they scrap all the locally developed stuff and lose the institutional knowledge as well as let the existing stuff slowly become obsolete.

Then the US stuff gets more expensive because the US military stops bankrolling it so heavily.

NOW we have the expese and difficulty of running someone else's stuff, where all teh money gets funnled out of the economy instead of back in.

It's like the situation you described, except much more expensive, far more futile and even more stupid. It's not just America as well. We love giving up great tech and then buying it back at great expense. It's practically a national passtime. But now we've become a service economy. This has not helped. Now it seems we do *exactly* the same with services too.

Re:Great for India (5, Insightful)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 3 months ago | (#47366769)

they still can't clean up their garbage, their sewage, or feed, house, and clothe 90% of their population. They can't even keep the power grid they do have up and running reliably.

You know what can fund them? Launching satellites for other countries, commercially, can. :)

Re:Great for India (1)

AikonMGB (1013995) | about 3 months ago | (#47367685)

I would have modded you "+1 Insightful" instead of funny. As I mentioned above, this is a high-technology field that brings national prestige, fosters education, and can bring in foreign money. You are spot on.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367901)

Dude we don't generate Garbage as much the world generates, we{Indian] are getting ahead in every aspect stop being jealous.

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47370243)

Anyone know the cost per kilogram for these launches?

Does India have the capability for launching anything outside of our gravitational field?

Re:Great for India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366819)

Feelings of inadiqucy?

WTF is __"inadiqucy"__ ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366889)

Feelings of inadiqucy?

Has the education level of /. readers suddenly sunk to the fucking abyss?

Re:Great for India (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 3 months ago | (#47367571)

They still had to study the work of others who pioneered it,

So? NASA and the US military wasn't shy about using Australian technology in scramjets recently because it's not a pissing contest of "must be invented here". It's about getting stuff done.
I could use a far more obvious example of where US rocketry "still had to study the work of others who pioneered it" but some would consider it a Godwin.

Re:Great for India (1)

dywolf (2673597) | about 3 months ago | (#47368401)

See? This only proves how much we don't need NASA. Daggone big gubmint boondoggles!
Now we can add NASA to the privatization list by letting GE or Boeing or someone outsource our space program to India!

(i'm merely impersonating other inviduals around here; i in no way believe we should actually do this)

Re:Great for India (1)

fox171171 (1425329) | about 3 months ago | (#47377901)

They studied hard and ensured they fully understood every aspect of basic satellite lunch systems domestically before moving to the next stage.

I can imagine an Indian scientist thinking "Hmmm... what do satellites like to eat for lunch, and what type of system can we build to feed it to them?"

Meanwhile... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366565)

665 million Indians don't have a private toilet. Way to prioritize, India.

Re:Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366671)

the launch was commercial and paid for by western countries, I guess you would prefer that they keep begging the west for aid rather than being self sufficient.....

Didn't the West just buy from India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366715)

I mean, why would they want to pay for this if they could build rockets themselves... Oh, wait.

Interestingly, India bought defense equipment from the US last year. Who needs financial aid when you can repurpose that money? These Western nations ought to be thankful to get any deals from India.

Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366707)

Where do you get your statistics from?

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 3 months ago | (#47369727)

Actually, other than the fact that they are cheating by manipulating their money, they ARE prioritizing correctly. You need a decent economy to help your nation. As such, they are working hard at doing so.
In a way, I have no issue with their manipulating their money, but object, when their economy booms and they continue to keep the manipulation going, along with blocking other nations.

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | about 3 months ago | (#47372047)

665 million Indians don't have a private toilet. Way to prioritize, India.

The "whitey's on the moon" argument looks wierd here.

Whores (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366569)

I will shit on a nun soon.

Start launching... (0)

Rick in China (2934527) | about 3 months ago | (#47366581)

Dead bodies into space, at least it'll cut down on the disease in the coliform bacterial wasteland known as the Ganges - where people bathe and drink because they're told it's sacred.

Re:Start launching... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47373219)

What does it say when you fail at even the most basic trolling? Try it in a less obvious way and you will make it into the teens.

Launch Not cheaper than Gravity...Mars Mission is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366585)

Incorrect summary, the in progress Mars Mission which at $ 75 Million is cheaper than Gravity movie's budget...

Re: Launch Not cheaper than Gravity...Mars Mission (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366771)

The only thing more opaque than government funded mission budgets (what's infrastructur, what's mission) is Hollywood accounting.

launch costs are tricky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366767)

One wants to know what costs are counted in that total. Is that the raw mfr cost of the launch vehicle? Do they count the cost of the facility, or is that funded out of a different budget? If you compare the purchase price of sn ICBM against the launch cost, theres a big difference.

Re:launch costs are tricky (-1)

Rick in China (2934527) | about 3 months ago | (#47366855)

Or the cost of the 2500 Harijans buried in a pit behind the manufacturing/launch plants.

Re:launch costs are tricky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367077)

Is that what happens to them in Taiwan? Horrible!

27 Satellites for India? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47366843)

27 satellites sounds like a lot, especially if you consider that they have to be put in a small corridor to be geostationary.
Or did I miss India building an alternative to GPS?

Nobody would dare to think that some of these satellites are used for spying other countries.

Is it true, or is it another lie. (1)

LordWabbit2 (2440804) | about 3 months ago | (#47366857)

I wonder how accurate that figure is, even Russel Peters jokes about how if you want your taxes done "right" you take it to an Indian book keeper.

Re:Is it true, or is it another lie. (1)

sonamchauhan (587356) | about 3 months ago | (#47367245)

You know Russell Peters is a comedian, right? :-) I'll wait for the meta-episode where Peters makes fun of people who got suckered into believing what he said.

Re:Is it true, or is it another lie. (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 3 months ago | (#47367587)

Are you really making that joke in the land of Enron and a cast of thousands?

Makes a lot of sense (1)

Justpin (2974855) | about 3 months ago | (#47366909)

As launches closer to the equator are given a 'free' boost by the rotation of the earth. There was a doomed project called sea launch from sea platforms which sailed to the equator specifically for this purpose. Though granted Europe has Guyana which is even closer.

Re:Makes a lot of sense (1)

AikonMGB (1013995) | about 3 months ago | (#47367617)

It really depends what your target inclination is. In general for a non-polar orbit, you want a launch complex with a latitude close to that inclination to minimize plane changes. This is why the ISS is at 51.65 degrees, to make it "easily" accessible from Baikonur. So yes, Sriharikota's proximity to the equator will be beneficial for low-inclination (near-equatorial) launches.

This particular launch, however, was to a sun-synchronous polar orbit. Your launch complex's latitude is much less important when launching to a polar orbit.

Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 3 months ago | (#47367121)

the Prime Minister of India noted that the launch was cheaper than Hollywood film Gravity.

That seems like a wacky comparison to me.

Ok, but maybe Gravity made more money than their launch?

Or, maybe they didn't actually do the launch, but just faked it in a film, like those folks who claim that the Apollo landings were fake films made by Stanley Kubrick in Area 51 . . . ?

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367189)

so what's your point?

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (1)

necro81 (917438) | about 3 months ago | (#47367419)

I found it a pretty goofy comparison, too. Gravity, according to imdb, cost an estimated $100 million to make. For that price, you could score a launch on almost any launch vehicle currently in service.

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (2)

dbIII (701233) | about 3 months ago | (#47367601)

Sounds like a good comparison. One star vehicle launched in a place with an unreliable power grid compared with another.

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367703)

It was so expensive because of the high license fees for the country music.

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367425)

The summary is wrong on that..The PM said India's Mars mission cost less than Gravity the movie. That may make more sense.

Re:Lauch cheaper than the film Gravity . . . ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47367455)

They are defying Gravity. A levitatingly good joke indeed.

Why soo much hate (2)

goblinspy (2738809) | about 3 months ago | (#47369009)

From reading all these comments I see lot of hate against India and Indians. Has /. now becoming like any other politically inclined news / blog.

Easy to do, when you manipulate the money (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 3 months ago | (#47369659)

Seriously, this is because they are manipulating the rupee against the $. This has to stop.

Re:Easy to do, when you manipulate the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47373295)

Uniformed troll is uninformed, News at 11.

Re:Easy to do, when you manipulate the money (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 3 months ago | (#47373675)

Why do you say that? It looks like you posted at 7, not 11.

Re:Easy to do, when you manipulate the money (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 3 months ago | (#47373747)

Uniformed troll is uninformed, News at 11.

BTW, here you go. [indianexpress.com]

Re:Easy to do, when you manipulate the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47379375)

Oh, you're referring to news from last year. I really doubt if you are informed at all.

And by what's posted in that article: "Those suspected to be involved in possible manipulations include some forex traders, as also certain Swiss banks and other European financial institutions, while it is unlikely as yet that any Indian bank or financial services firm might be directly involved, sources said."

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