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Mad Cow Disease Blamed For Patient's Death In Texas

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the where'd-it-come-from dept.

Medicine 132

An anonymous reader writes 'Health officials say a patient in Texas has died of a rare brain disorder believed to be caused by consumption of beef products contaminated with mad cow disease. It is only the fourth known case of its kind in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement that recent laboratory tests confirmed a diagnosis of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the patient.' From the article: 'The CDC says the Texas patient's history included extensive travel to Europe and the Middle East and that it is likely the infection occurred overseas. In each of the three previous U.S. deaths, the initial infection is believed to have taken place in other countries. ... The Texas Department of State Health Services says there are no state public health concerns or threats associated with the case. State and federal health officials continue to investigate and are trying to track the source of the infection.'

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And the cow goes (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47184949)

Moooooo!

And the mad cow goes... (3, Funny)

Pseudonym (62607) | about 3 months ago | (#47185037)

Mooooomuwahahahahaha! Moo! Moo! HahahahahaMOOOO! Why is a raven like a writing-desk? MOOOOO!

Re:And the mad cow goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185485)

Because it can produce a few notes, tho they are very flat; and it is nevar put with the wrong end in front!

Re:And the mad cow goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185509)

We can consider both of them spherical and in a vacuum.

Re:And the mad cow goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185979)

And of a uniform density in an frictionless environment.

And the mad cow goes... (1)

Jmstuckman (561420) | about 3 months ago | (#47186319)

You're 15 years late with that joke, but thanks for playing:
  http://www.niebank.com/madcow.... [niebank.com]

Re:And the mad cow goes... (1)

Pseudonym (62607) | about 3 months ago | (#47190159)

I know of at least three comedians who had essentially the same idea independently about 15 years ago.

Re:And the mad cow goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186913)

Inky quills.

TX Law (4, Informative)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 3 months ago | (#47184961)

They have to be careful what they say about beef in Texas, there is a law against disparaging beef in the state [ehow.com] .

Re:TX Law (2)

macraig (621737) | about 3 months ago | (#47185039)

It ain't India, that's for sure. Can't disparage it but you can damned straight slaughter it and serve it up with a dash of A-1.

Re:TX Law (2)

davester666 (731373) | about 3 months ago | (#47185487)

And of course, note that while they require beef from other countries to pretty much all be tested, and fully trackable back to the gleam in the bull's eye, none of that is needed for US beef, particularly that they make sure to test as few animals as possible to minimize the possibility of actually noticing that animal has CJD.

Re:TX Law (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 3 months ago | (#47185947)

none of that is needed for US beef

Exactly! That's the whole point they're trying to make; U.S. beef is safe... so why are we even talking about this?? (/sarc) Nevermind the Yale study that showed a vast proportion of the brains of those [presumed to have died of Alzheimer's] being ridden with holes from vCJD... How else are the elites supposed to solve the population problem, if not through subterfuge?? ;)

Re:TX Law (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 3 months ago | (#47186261)

I was thinking about the Texas logic of "Voting with Your Wallet," it sure looks like it's a hell of a plan.

Re:TX Law (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | about 3 months ago | (#47186517)

The "Elites" don't want to kill off the poor huddled masses, they want to enslave them to work in their sweatshops and factories. There is no profit to be made from people dying in large numbers as they (the poor) can't afford to pay for that and would just leave the bodies in a pile somewhere. The mad cow crisis has been fixed, they now slaughter cows at a sufficiently young age that they won't show evidence of mad cow disease. Out of sight, out of mind is much cheaper than banning feeding cows animal protein or testing all cows for the disease (both would eliminate problem).

Re:TX Law (2)

Dutchmaan (442553) | about 3 months ago | (#47185065)

There's a difference between "steak sedition" and actual defamantion of a beef provider.

Re:TX Law (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 3 months ago | (#47185121)

Cows and corporations are people.

Re:TX Law (1)

plopez (54068) | about 3 months ago | (#47185145)

Gosh, you'd think in the state where they are so protective of the 2nd amendment they would be interested in the 1st. BTW, the way this is sometimes known as the "Oprah Law" after Oprah Winfrey who aired an episode on tainted beef in TX. I guess that they can no longer tell the joke "The only mad cow in TX is Oprah" anymore.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185249)

Naw, the first amendment is one of them hippie liberal amendments.

Re:TX Law (1)

Tanuki64 (989726) | about 3 months ago | (#47185763)

I guess that they can no longer tell the joke "The only mad cow in TX is Oprah" anymore.

After seeing several patent decisions from TX courts , I think mad cow disease is rampant in Texas for years. So I guess this joke could not be told for quite some time.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47187451)

Those aren't Texas courts, those are federal courts for east Texas.

Re:TX Law (1)

DoubleJ1024 (1287512) | about 3 months ago | (#47185987)

2nd amendment? I think you need to read up about Texas. They are NOT the 2nd amendment friendly state everyone thinks they are, an example is if you even show the FAINT OUTLINE of a concealed firearm you can be arrested, loose your carry permit, and go to jail. Do not even mention open carry of a firearm or you will get hassled badly by law enforcement. However if you go to just about any of the surrounding states they don't care so much about carrying a firearm. Texas is set up to keep the "undesirables" in their place, and keep the "right" people in power.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186347)

Umm... what about all this OCT business we've been hearing about in the news?

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186533)

Umm... what about all this OCT business we've been hearing about in the news?

Apparently you haven't been hearing much about it after all. Those OCT hi jinks are supposed to contrast the ridiculousness of Texas having both permissive OC rules and restrictive CC rules. I suspect the OCT folks think the result will be to make the CC rules as permissive as the OC rules ... when it's more likely (even in Texas) that the OC rules will simply become as restrictive as the CC rules.

Re:TX Law (0)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about 3 months ago | (#47185277)

It's not defamation if it's true. Oprah irresponsibly used her mainstream media platform to falsely suggest that U.S. beef was affected by mad cow disease, causing a disaster in the industry. She was found not guilty, but it was enough that she was hauled into court over it.

And seriously, a link to eHow? Eww, my mouse feels dirty after clicking on that.

Re:TX Law (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185285)

If you can fucking read, why did you click it?

Because you're a douchebag. That's why. You're a douchebag.

Fuck off.

Re:TX Law (5, Informative)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 3 months ago | (#47185309)

Oprah said that SHE lost interest in eating hamburgers because of the BSE outbreak in Europe. She didn't disparage US Beef producers. She didn't tell her army of soccer moms to stop eating beef. That's why she won.

I'm not an Oprah fan but fair is fair and suing her was bullshit.

LK

Re:TX Law (-1, Troll)

Mashiki (184564) | about 3 months ago | (#47185371)

And Jenny Mccarthy hasn't fueled a growth in the anti-vaxxer movement based on...lies and misinformation right?

Re:TX Law (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185667)

Don't you badmouth Oprah, motherfucker! She's an American treasure.

Re:TX Law (0)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 3 months ago | (#47186473)

How is it that you think she had enough influence to convince people to not vaccinate their kids but at the same time, but somehow her change of heart on the matter hasn't affected anyone?

LK

Re:TX Law (0)

silvermorph (943906) | about 3 months ago | (#47186831)

Pandora's box - it's easier to spread fear than to take it back.

Re:TX Law (0)

Mashiki (184564) | about 3 months ago | (#47188073)

Fear and misinformation are easier to spread, than to correct. And that's exactly how her "influence" spread. Now of course, saying the opposite people will believe that it's a great conspiracy by *insert whatever.*

Welcome to reality 101.

Re:TX Law (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about 3 months ago | (#47185863)

Oh, please. Don't be fatuous. She's huge and has a great influence. If the outbreak is in Europe, then what is there to fear in America? Yeah, she didn't outright say "I recommend you stop eating beef immediately" but that's pretty much what happened. Suppose she had said, "I'm not going to vaccinate my children" and that would be the same thing, right? Bullshit.

PS put your signature line in your signature file, accessible in the Slashdot user options panel.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185877)

Why do you give a shit where someone puts their signature line, or are you just a pedantic asshole?

Re: TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186139)

Some of us turn off viewing signatures because we're only here to read comments. But if you want to put all data into a single column in your databases, go ahead.

Re: TX Law (0)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 3 months ago | (#47186521)

That's an option for the Anonymous?

LK

Re:TX Law (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 3 months ago | (#47186493)

She's huge and has a great influence. If the outbreak is in Europe, then what is there to fear in America?

Probably nothing but that's not the point. Like I said, she discussed her personal preference. It doesn't matter that those middle-aged, white soccer moms followed suit. They did so on their own, as they are free to do.

If someone were to declare that their personal religious beliefs prevented them from vaccinating their children and other people followed suit, each person is responsible for their own choices.

LK

Re:TX Law (1)

bmo (77928) | about 3 months ago | (#47186661)

PS put your signature line in your signature file

No.

--
BMO

Re:TX Law (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185867)

Eww, my mouse feels dirty

Your mouse IS dirty.

Why ?

Because you licked your mouse after licking a dozen sweaty ball sacks.

You should have stuck to sucking cock, you sorry cocksucker.

Re:TX Law (1, Informative)

Megane (129182) | about 3 months ago | (#47185735)

The CDC says the Texas patient's history included extensive travel to Europe and the Middle East and that it is likely the infection occurred overseas. In each of the three previous U.S. deaths, the initial infection is believed to have taken place in other countries.

It wasn't from Texas beef.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185881)

It wasn't from Texas beef.

The CDC doesn't KNOW where the infection occurred. The
CDC is making a guess at best.

Yet you believe that this CDC statement allows you to categorically
state that the infection was not from Texas beef.

People who are more intelligent than you don't take a guess and
believe it is a fact. I'm guessing you are from Texas, which is known
to contain a very large percentage of idiots, and you are one of those
idiots.

Next time, shove a cock in your mouth instead of talking shit, you imbecile.

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185821)

why do I find it amusing with all the steroids and other shit they pump cattle with in Texas and the US they insist they must have caught it aboard.

Re:TX Law (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | about 3 months ago | (#47185851)

You know that none of that has anything to do with Mad Cow disease, yes?

Re:TX Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47187279)

No but if you abuse your food chain so badly as the norm what other practices are all so allowed? Let alone when humans being humans take short cuts due to greed or desperation?

Re:TX Law (1)

Vellmont (569020) | about 3 months ago | (#47186061)

The story you linked to says the burden of proof is on the person suing, and must prove the statement was libelous. I believe libel is already illegal. The makes the law really stupid if it's already covered by libel laws. But it's not quite having to be careful about what you say about beef.

Re:TX Law (1)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 3 months ago | (#47187005)

Libel of a person != libel of a food product. So, I stand by my assertion that they need to "be careful what they say about beef" in Texas. Certainly, if it's true, they have nothing to worry about.

Well, whatever you do.... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47184993)

Don't grind the guy up and feed him to any livestock, please.

Thanks!

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 3 months ago | (#47185007)

Don't grind the guy up and feed him to any livestock, please.

Thanks!

...or eat him, for that matter.

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47185051)

You can eat his muscle, but don't eat the brain.

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185199)

There are prions elsewhere in the body, they just aren't as highly concentrated in the muscle as they are in the brain.

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 3 months ago | (#47185495)

But you can gain his courage. His rich, tasty courage...

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 3 months ago | (#47190493)

Mad cow disease gives courage. Aha, so that is how it works.

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (2)

lazy genes (741633) | about 3 months ago | (#47185047)

That form of prion disease has never jumped species. They spent millions of dollars trying to get it to jump species and the only case was when they injected it directly into the brain of a mouse. The complexity of this disease makes me think it was designed or that evolution may have been going on for a lot more than 4 billion years. Its an evolutionary solution to the problem of eating the closest thing available and stops zombie apocalypses from starting.

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185753)

the only case was when they injected it directly into the brain of a mouse

Whatever you do, don't grind the guy up and slip him into a Mickey!!

Re:Well, whatever you do.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185865)

There was a theory that mad cow disease is mad moose disease and my relatives tell me of many cases in Minnesota.

Of course they have no concerns, they don't test. (2)

ihop0 (988608) | about 3 months ago | (#47185015)

'The Texas Department of State Health Services says there are no state public health concerns or threats associated with the case. State and federal health officials continue to investigate and are trying to track the source of the infection.'

It's easy to say there's no concerns when it can take 30yrs to manifest, is eerily similar to Alzheimer's, and can't be diagnosed without a brain biopsy, which is rarely done.

It'd raise the price of beef 1 cent per pound to test every cow slaughtered, but they obviously lobby tooth & nail against doing so.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185025)

Why do you hate capitalism?

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

chipperdog (169552) | about 3 months ago | (#47185027)

Teeth and nails go in the grinder.. :-)

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

bswarm (2540294) | about 3 months ago | (#47185029)

"they obviously lobby tooth & nail against doing so" Shouldn't that be "they obviously lobby hoof and mouth against doing so"???

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

plopez (54068) | about 3 months ago | (#47185149)

They should check for "hoof and mouth" as well.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (2)

rossdee (243626) | about 3 months ago | (#47185163)

No, hoof and mouth is a different disease. It doesn't affect humans at all, but it is much more contagious amongst cloven hoof quadrapeds
(beef, shhep, pigs, etc) it would be a big disaster for the USA.

Of course theres a separate disease called 'foot in mouth disease' that affects humans, especially politicians

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (2, Informative)

Nutria (679911) | about 3 months ago | (#47185041)

It'd raise the price of beef 1 cent per pound to test every cow slaughtered,

Wow... you're a deluded idiot. From TFA, which you obviously did not read:
A U.S.D.A. surveillance program tests brain tissue taken from about 40,000 dead cows a year for BSE.

Also from the article:
Another key part of the U.S. food safety net is to make sure that animal tissues that can carry BSE - including the brain and spinal cord - are removed from cattle before they're processed for food.

Not only are you a deluded idiot, but you're too stupid to do the barest of study:

It's easy to say there's no concerns when it can take 30yrs to manifest

Most victims die six months after initial symptoms appear, often of pneumonia due to impaired coughing reflexes. About 15% of patients survive for two or more years.[12] Some patients have been known to live 4â"5 years with mostly psychological symptoms until the disease progresses causing more physical symptoms leading to a diagnosis and inevitable death usually within the first year of diagnosis. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47185071)

Most victims die six months after initial symptoms appear,

And how long from exposure to initial symptoms?

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185289)

I lived in England thirty years ago and ate the beef. I am still ineligible to donate blood.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185609)

I lived in England during the 90s and ate some beef.

I'd personally prefer dying from not getting donated blood than getting BSE/CJD. Everyone dies eventually but CJD is a bad way to go.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (2)

ihop0 (988608) | about 3 months ago | (#47185081)

Does the US only slaughter 40,000 cows a year?

From your link:

'Additional concerns

In The Lancet (June 2006), a University College London team suggested that it may take more than 50 years for vCJD to develop, from their studies of kuru, a similar disease in Papua New Guinea.[59] The reasoning behind the claim is that kuru was possibly transmitted through cannibalism in Papua New Guinea when family members would eat the body of a dead relative as a sign of mourning. In the 1950s, cannibalism was banned in Papua New Guinea.[60]

In the late 20th century, however, kuru reached epidemic proportions in certain Papua New Guinean communities, therefore suggesting that vCJD may also have a similar incubation period of 20 to 50 years.'

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

blippo (158203) | about 3 months ago | (#47185715)

To answer Your rethorical question: No.

More than 90,000 cows are slaughtered every day.

So slightly more than 1 / 1000 of the cattle is tested.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (4, Informative)

meglon (1001833) | about 3 months ago | (#47185095)

It'd raise the price of beef 1 cent per pound to test every cow slaughtered,

Wow... you're a deluded idiot. From TFA, which you obviously did not read: A U.S.D.A. surveillance program tests brain tissue taken from about 40,000 dead cows a year for BSE.

http://usda01.library.cornell.... [cornell.edu]

"Commercial cattle slaughter during 2012 totaled 33.0 million head" (pg6)

At least Ihop0 wasn't a deluded enough of an idiot to confuse 40,000 to 33 million.

Also from the article: Another key part of the U.S. food safety net is to make sure that animal tissues that can carry BSE - including the brain and spinal cord - are removed from cattle before they're processed for food.

Not only are you a deluded idiot, but you're too stupid to do the barest of study:

It's easy to say there's no concerns when it can take 30yrs to manifest

Most victims die six months after initial symptoms appear, often of pneumonia due to impaired coughing reflexes. About 15% of patients survive for two or more years.[12] Some patients have been known to live 4â"5 years with mostly psychological symptoms until the disease progresses causing more physical symptoms leading to a diagnosis and inevitable death usually within the first year of diagnosis. [wikipedia.org]

http://memory.ucsf.edu/cjd/ove... [ucsf.edu]

"The incubation period is the time it takes you to become sick after you've contracted a disease. Cold symptoms usually start a day or two after you're exposed to a cold virus, for example, whereas the time frame for CJD is considerably longer. We think that it often takes years or even decades after exposure to the infectious forms before someone with CJD develops signs and symptoms of the disease."

And once again, at least Ihop0 wasn't a deluded idiot enough not to understand that the people didn't contract the disease initially the second they started showing initial symptoms.... although the quote you have there from wikipedia basically reinforces what he said, instead of what you are trying to imply.

So, what was our point other than randomly try to bash someone by having your inability to understand the written word flair up?

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 3 months ago | (#47185137)

They take a sample from every herd, because even if it would only add $0.01/lb of beef, would there actually be time to analyze all 33M slaughtered head of beef every year?

Anyway, beef has been big business in the US for a long time. Why is (according to the Minnesota Dept of Health) the disease rate still 1/1,000,000 per year? http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/cjd/cjd.html [state.mn.us]

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

oji-sama (1151023) | about 3 months ago | (#47185547)

They take a sample from every herd, because even if it would only add $0.01/lb of beef, would there actually be time to analyze all 33M slaughtered head of beef every year?

In Finland they check every healthy specimen over 30 moths old and sick ones that are over 24 months old at time of slaughter. Texas might have a cow or two more, but something something economics of scale might be of some help.

Anyway, beef has been big business in the US for a long time. Why is (according to the Minnesota Dept of Health) the disease rate still 1/1,000,000 per year? http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/cjd/cjd.html [state.mn.us]

I honestly hope the disease rate stays low.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185983)

Scale of economics never works in america, they are too many! /s

no but seriously, that's always their excuse to not do something.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185247)

In general, the US government (specifically) will say one thing and mean something completely different. If they sample 33 million, they could simply do statistical sampling and say the group is properly sampled. As with a number of issues (FISA, INS, etc) the US government uses language as a weapon against The People in court. I know that when a meat processing plant is found to have fallen out of compliance (i.e. completely disregarded such simple guidelines as "don't throw the head in the grinder" in pursuit of profits...usually), they don't count that as unsampled either. There was a bust in California, due to such noncompliance, last year.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185113)

It'd raise the price of beef 1 cent per pound to test every cow slaughtered,

Wow... you're a deluded idiot. From TFA, which you obviously did not read:

  A U.S.D.A. surveillance program tests brain tissue taken from about 40,000 dead cows a year for BSE.

Also from the article:

  Another key part of the U.S. food safety net is to make sure that animal tissues that can carry BSE - including the brain and spinal cord - are removed from cattle before they're processed for food.

Not only are you a deluded idiot, but you're too stupid to do the barest of study:

It's easy to say there's no concerns when it can take 30yrs to manifest

Most victims die six months after initial symptoms appear, often of pneumonia due to impaired coughing reflexes. About 15% of patients survive for two or more years.[12] Some patients have been known to live 4Ãf"5 years with mostly psychological symptoms until the disease progresses causing more physical symptoms leading to a diagnosis and inevitable death usually within the first year of diagnosis. [wikipedia.org] [wikipedia.org]

You seem convinced of this.

And yet you talk to people with inside knowledge of the industry and they tell you (surprising) up front they use these scare tactics to drive up prices, and drive down demand. It is a pretty simple and effective method. They do the same with poultry, and pork.

Nothing to see or read here time to move on!

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (4, Informative)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 3 months ago | (#47185143)

You are a fucking idiot. It incubates for anywhere up to 7-10 years before symptoms appear. By the time symptoms appear, you're already fucked.

Testing 40,000 cows is a drop in the bucket. UK tests *EVERY SINGLE COW*.

The symptoms manifests in cows after about 7 years, so under Bush, they changed the requirement that meat cows be slaughtered before 3, so no one can even spot a cow that is carrying it.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about 3 months ago | (#47186483)

Well, yes, but then the UK had a significant number of cases of humans getting the disease (137 cases over 8 years out of a population of approximately 60 million). On the other hand the U.S. has NOT had a significant number of cases (3 cases over 19 years out of a population of 300 million).

Trivial numbers In the grand scheme (1)

Martin S. (98249) | about 3 months ago | (#47189707)

UK Cause of Death 2010 [theguardian.com]

We are more likely to die of heart disease from eating Beef than CJD, the whole thing is a classic ersatz scandal.

Re:Of course they have no concerns, they don't tes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186983)

Don't know about the US, but the reason for the UK prevalency is that they were actually feeding slaughter scraps to other cattle (one theory being that a facility which had processed sheep with scrapie transferred it to this cattle feed from hell). Slaughtering cattle young makes sense to me; in the case there is an infection there's less of the prion so as long as you don't have a "closed loop" like in the UK the problems should be far less likely. Otoh one problem is that the incubation times may be insanely long especially since it's a disease that is contracted between species; with Kuru the source of the epidemic in Papua New Guinea was cannibalism/careless handling of bodies and the incubation period could be as long as 40 years.

Re: Of course they have no concerns, they don't te (1)

jimicus (737525) | about 3 months ago | (#47185435)

Traditional CJD can take many years to manifest. A variant came about some time ago and the variant only takes a few years to show symptoms.

John Titor! (1)

capnskull (1904132) | about 3 months ago | (#47185055)

John Titor mentioned this!

MAN STEAK! (1)

Dutchmaan (442553) | about 3 months ago | (#47185057)

I say MAN STEAK! MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! Mad Human Disease is here!!!!!!!!!

GoVegan! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185059)

GoVegan!

Re:GoVegan! (2)

meerling (1487879) | about 3 months ago | (#47185107)

I'd rather not, I'm pretty sure they have some kind of neurological disorder to begin with. ;)

Re:GoVegan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185325)

the more obvious solution here is to just kill all texans...

Re: GoVegan! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185391)

Just start in Austin and Houston. where the good liberal drones aren't armed so they can protect themselves. By the time you make your way to DFW, you'll have made Texas a much better place.

Re:GoVogon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185647)

Sit on those elegant gazellelike creatures with dewey eyes!

Texas cows are dwindling (1)

LordNimon (85072) | about 3 months ago | (#47185125)

Just FYI, the inventory of Texas cows is generally shrinking year over year.

http://tscra.org/news_blog/201... [tscra.org]

Re:Texas cows are dwindling (1)

plopez (54068) | about 3 months ago | (#47185157)

Beef consumption is declining, thanks to "Mad Cow" and red slime, and the TX industry has been badly hit by drought too. Climate change driven drought no less.

In Nevada... (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 3 months ago | (#47185127)

...cows are afraid of catching Mad Bundy Disease.

Funny how 4 is not too many. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185135)

wonder if it is 40 or 400 that will be.

Two cows were grazing... (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about 3 months ago | (#47185209)

So, two cows were grazing and chatting...

"Did you hear about that 'mad cow disease' thing?"
"Yeah."
"Aren't you worried?"
"No. Why should I be? I am not a cow. I am a helicopter!"

Re:Two cows were grazing... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185579)

FFS get some priorities - a man died! This is a mooving story.

Re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47185341)

Denny Crane.

Prions in the brain? (1)

Walter White (1573805) | about 3 months ago | (#47185711)

And woe betide any zombies who eat his brain!

I could point out (0)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | about 3 months ago | (#47185777)

There's been less than 300 cases of this disease ever so this is a super rare disease.(I wouldn't be surprised if you're more likely to die from being crushed by a vending machine than ever knowing someone who died of VCJD) Or I could point out that it's actually extremely rare in US cattle not because of testing but because letting the cows graze is so cheap farmers in the US never really got into feeding their animals ground up animal parts. (Hey, doesn't the feds let these rangers graze their animals on federal land for a really cheap price? That's probably done more to keep this disease in check than anything else. I could have sworn some jack-ass was in the news a month or 2 ago because he didn't want to pay his grazing fees.)

Re:I could point out (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | about 3 months ago | (#47186939)

[...] farmers in the US never really got into feeding their animals ground up animal parts.

Not quite. Feeding cows to cows had to be explicitly banned by the FDA. Now we feed cows to chickens then feed "poultry litter" to cows. http://www.motherjones.com/tom... [motherjones.com]

Texas? (1)

wb8nbs (174741) | about 3 months ago | (#47185943)

My brother in law died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Wisconsin. They said he could have been infected up to 20 years earlier, it hangs around until it flares up.

Trust me, it is NOT a good way to go. Similar to death from Alzheimers, but only takes about a month. Mys ister had a hard finding someone to take the body, noone wanted to touch it.

Fuck Slashdot beta (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186365)

Fuck Slashdot beta!
Why would I want to read Slashdot beta when the text that has so much space between the line shifts, as to make it harder to read. I don't.

Blamed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47186837)

Was it or wasn't it?

mmmmm steak (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 months ago | (#47187309)

Its what's for dinner.

Some further detail (2)

Torgo's Pizza (547926) | about 3 months ago | (#47189071)

My parents were very good friends with the victim and his wife. His death had a large impact on his family and those that knew him. His death occurred only a few months ago. He was in otherwise good health until recently. Doctor's suspected something neurological but only diagnosed him with probable CJD *after* exploratory brain surgery. Needless to say, the entire hospital and staff were exposed; which prompted immediate attention from state and federal health officials. I'm actually surprised that news of this incident hasn't been publicized until now.

The family does believe that he contracted the disease during his out of the country travels, and *not* in Texas. As a previous poster mentioned, CJD is a tragic way to go. To the family, it was a sudden shock and a rapid deterioration with absolutely no hope for recovery. I have great admiration for his wife who stood by his side the entire time as she stood by and cared for him until the end.

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