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Mental Illness Reduces Lifespan As Much as Smoking

timothy posted about 2 months ago | from the both-at-once-is-just-asking-for-it dept.

Medicine 192

That smoking is bad for your health is a commonplace; cancer, lung disease, and other possible consequences can all shorten smokers' lifespans. A new meta study from researchers at Oxford concludes that mental illness is just as big a factor in shortening lives, and not only because depression is a contributing factor to suicide. From the story at NPR: "We know that smoking boosts the risk of cancer and heart disease, says Dr. Seena Fazel, a psychiatrist at Oxford University who led the study. But aside from the obvious fact that people with mental illnesses are more likely to commit suicide, it's not clear how mental disorders could be causing early deaths. The researchers looked at data on 1.7 million patients, drawing from 20 recent scientific reviews and studies from mostly wealthy countries. Comparing the effects of mental illness and smoking helps put the stats in context, Fazel tells Shots. 'It was useful to benchmark against something that has a very high mortality rate.'" [Press release from Oxford.]

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This is unauthorized content (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 2 months ago | (#47089997)

There are no pandas allowed on Slashdort and this article has been reported to the frog queen. Shoes must be LISP.

Re:This is unauthorized content (1)

Sardaukar86 (850333) | about 2 months ago | (#47090213)

There are no pandas allowed on Slashdort and this article has been reported to the frog queen. Shoes must be LISP.

For a (content-) Free Internet?

Can't be right. (0)

fyngyrz (762201) | about 2 months ago | (#47090403)

The demographic for Fox News viewers is mainly old folks. If this study were true, the demographic for Fox News viewers would be dead people.

Are geniuses having short lives ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090595)

They say that true geniuses are only a hairline away from craziness

So if craziness can shorten your life, would geniuses' lives in danger as well ?

Re:Are geniuses having short lives ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090913)

I wish pedophiles would live shorter lives, but they seem immune to this.

Re:This is unauthorized content (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47091193)

I have a feeling you're at risk. :(

An opinion from a layman (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47089999)

Perhaps the reduced life expectancy is comparable to that caused by high-stress lifestyles. If I was paranoid or socially ostracised, as the mentally ill commonly are, I'd be stressed too.

Re:An opinion from a layman (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090039)

Perhaps the reduced life expectancy is comparable to that caused by high-stress lifestyles. If I was paranoid or socially ostracised, as the mentally ill commonly are, I'd be stressed too.

I would also add that mental illness & stress also reduce the ability of those afflicted to care for themselves, resulting in unhealthy lifestyle choices, and drives away those who might want to help as well.

Re:An opinion from a layman (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090207)

As someone with untreated clinical depression and a sleep disorder (or just with one and the other as a symptom) I agree with the parent and his smart grandparent. "Mental illness" can be extremely stressful. I see too many choices and it takes a long time to come up with the best choice. Deciding takes too long which eats up my already shortened time. As my time disappears more and more tasks start piling up Too many tasks makes me feel overwhelmed and I break down and use escapism to avoid my seemingly impossible things to do (each task for you would take 10-30 minutes to complete). I was at least able to stop playing video games, but now I'm watching way too much TV (currently on Red Dawn and slowly moving backwards through highly rated scf-fi TV shows after finishing all the well known shows).

I get very little accomplished with all that procrastinating, which makes me feel even more depressed. I do try and get out with people, but after a night of dance club I cry myself to sleep from the stress of dealing with people and all the mistakes I made screwing up dance moves I should have known, knowing I'm a loser because I was standing on the side lines waiting for someone to ask me to dance instead of having the confidence to ask them, or people telling me I should smile more. Really please stop that. The last thing I need you to tell me is that I'm making everyone around me feel bad because I don't look happy enough. That reduces my confidence even further because then I believe everyone is bothered by me and doesn't want me around. True or not, it increases escapism and reduces healthier activities.

How would you like to walk barefoot through a large area converted with poisonous snakes? That's what it's like all the time with crippling social anxiety. Anything you do and your inactions must be perfect or you'll be destroyed by those around you. Since just being in such a situation is extremely stressful in and of itself, you'll make mistakes.

Re:An opinion from a layman (1)

Cryacin (657549) | about 2 months ago | (#47090355)

One obvious additional factor is needing to take medications. Medications are a form of drug, and they do alter body chemistry etc from someone that doesn't need it. Not for a minute am I saying that people who have mental illness should be off their meds, but it is the lesser of two evils when compared to a healthy person.

Re:An opinion from a layman (4, Insightful)

Lotana (842533) | about 2 months ago | (#47090499)

It is very hard. I am convinced that changing the way a person thinks is one of the most challenging things in life.

What is helping me improve my social anxiety and depression is seeing a psychologist. Combination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and medication gives me a small edge to help me cope.

I sympathize with your struggles. I hope you will find what works for you to avoid sinking deeper into that abyss.

Re: An opinion from a layman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090545)

I admire the courage that went into posting that, even if it is AC.

I know I have a tendency to endanger myself, particularly when I'm overwhelmed by anxiety.

As for social anxiety, desensitized yourself may help. Go somewhere with a best friend and simply do everything he/she suggests, blindly. This alleviates the stress of making decisions and allows you to project any guilt from mistakes made ontothe friend. Resolve yourself to explain away anything necessary to those around you by saying, "hey, that wasn't my idea, this bozo over here told me to do it. I just lost a bet."

You may also want to look into EMDR and CBT.

Re:An opinion from a layman (1)

HuguesT (84078) | about 2 months ago | (#47090985)

Why are you untreated? Anxiety and depression can be treated fairly effectively. It doesn't cure you but it does allow you to function better.

Re:An opinion from a layman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47091103)

I read about how anti-depressants can be bad for you and damage your brain before I read about the good they can do. They also treat the symptoms and not the reason those symptoms came to be. The same reason I don't take cold meds unless I have something really important I need to focus on; if I'm sick I want to know I'm sick so I can adjust and get better faster. If you mask the symptoms you don't know how sick you really are. There's enough things I can try to improve before taking pills, the problem is I do them for a day or two but can never keep them going. I've have a few first meetings with different psychologists, but something comes up and I have to cancel our second meeting and I never go back. A year or two later I go back and have another first meeting and the cycle repeats. Not being able to track all the food you eat for a week is frustrating. I don't want to go back and say I couldn't do something so simple.

I also made it this far without them (graduated college), so in theory I can keep going without them. I've gotten a little better throughout the years. And finally, because I'm concerned on what they might do to me in the future. More people go on violent sprees after taking these types of meds, they cost a lot, and my options might be more limited in the future once I'm officially labeled as someone with a mental disorder (which I might be already). General fear of the unknown. Being depressed since a little kid means that's what you know and sort-of find comfortable compared to some other state of being. I didn't even realize I was depressed until my last year at school. I just thought I was lazy, extremely shy, worthless, and an extreme night owl.

Responding to someone else's post, when you're depressed and have social anxiety you don't have friends with whom you can go out and do things with. You see everyone as acquaintances. You've got no one to lean on. Who wants to be around someone who never looks happy or never laughs? People joke about it to me, "I'll make you laugh before the end of your internship" or "I've seen him smile once, I know he can do it", but they never stop to think about why I might not be laughing. Though I've gotten better at faking it.

Re:An opinion from a layman (1)

nbauman (624611) | about 2 months ago | (#47090773)

There's a pretty high level of suicides among schizophrenics. If the schizophrenia is severe, they can also engage in dangerous behavior, like walking into traffic or onto subway tracks.

Re:An opinion from a layman (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 months ago | (#47090865)

There's a pretty high level of suicides among schizophrenics. If the schizophrenia is severe, they can also engage in dangerous behavior, like walking into traffic or onto subway tracks.

I would think that people with mental illnesses are more likely to die from accidents, because they may not react as quickly or correctly to a dangerous situation. Not necessarily because of being slow or stupid (although those count too), but they may have other things on their mind. Or may be on medication that affects the ability to react correctly.

Re:An opinion from a layman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090929)

Schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder. The all have a tendency to suicide.
It is hard enough to fight stuff like cancer or autoimmune disorders where the body turns on itself. When your mind is the enemy? Where do you even start?
There is a youtuber named Erin Lee that made an episode about her bipolar disorder. Its quite interesting to hear the perspective of people who have survived mental illness.

"Like being trapped on an airplane and there is a crying baby right behind you and it's a four hour flight and you don't have anywhere to go and the baby just keeps crying. It's like that but 24 hours, 7 days a week, in your head."

"...impulsive behavior combined with suicidal thoughts, and that is not a good combo."

"When you have a voice in your head, not only screaming, but also very logically, very soundly, telling you over and over that you should commit suicide, because it's what you are destined to, it's very hard not to listen."

Re:An opinion from a layman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090117)

If I was paranoid or socially ostracised, as the mentally ill commonly are, I'd be stressed too.

If? Come on, this is Slashdot.

Re:An opinion from a layman (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 2 months ago | (#47090679)

Who says Slashdotters are mellow? I can tell by some of the quick down-mods I get.

Re:An opinion from a layman (3, Interesting)

nbauman (624611) | about 2 months ago | (#47090761)

One of the big problems is that anti-psychotic drugs have severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects. (Many of them cause severe weight gain, often enough to lead to diabetes.)

It's actually difficult or impossible to find out whether a drug causes, say, fatal heart attacks, if they didn't show up with 1% frequency in 500 patients in 6 months in the original FDA approval trials.

World Psychiatry is an open access journal, but that issue isn't on its web site yet. http://www.wpanet.org/detail.p... [wpanet.org] So I can't read the article and find out whether they deal with this.

I had a friend who was schizophrenic. He had finished a couple of years at Columbia before the schizophrenia hit. Fortunately his parents were relatively wealthy, and they could put him up in an apartment with a relatively normal lifestyle. He had a girlfriend. They smoked a lot of marijuana.

One day he died suddenly, for no apparent reason. I think the final diagnosis was a heart attack. His psychiatrist insisted that it wasn't the drugs that did it, but I later found out that his drugs were associated with some fatalities.

More reason to support treatment for mental health (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090007)

Yes, because getting shot by someone with a mental illness has a direct impact on health.

Re:More reason to support treatment for mental hea (1)

Cryacin (657549) | about 2 months ago | (#47090357)

It's called acute lead poisoning.

so true :| (5, Insightful)

jtrainor (820767) | about 2 months ago | (#47090025)

I can nail this one: Mentally ill people generally don't take good care of themselves. They tend to eat worse and more irregularly, sleep odd hours, and not get to the doctor as much (for whatever reason), especially if they live by themselves and no one's looking after them.

Basically, the severely mentally ill tend to make poor lifestyle choices a lot more.

Re:so true :| (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090041)

Your phrasing makes it sound like it's voluntary. Mentally ill people are often unable to make choices because of their illness, and so as a result, it's not a choice, it's just doing enough to get by.

Re:so true :| (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090089)

The rhetoric of "choice" and "responsibility" is quasi-religious anyway, with no basis in science.

The human mind is very far from rational, and what little neurological evidence we have suggests we may make decisions before we have even become consciously aware of them - it's just really good at tricking itself into thinking it is a magically rational computer.

Rather than an artificial, binary divide between the capable and the incapable, it would be much better if we thought on a sliding scale in terms of some people being programmed to manage certain affairs better than others, and recognised that there is no fault beyond birth.

Re:so true :| (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 months ago | (#47090153)

Your phrasing makes it sound like it's voluntary. Mentally ill people are often unable to make choices because of their illness, and so as a result, it's not a choice, it's just doing enough to get by.

Doesn't really make much difference, does it? It doesn't matter whose fault it is, in the end, the depressed person is the one that suffers. That's why worrying about blame is silly.

Re:so true :| (2)

BitterOak (537666) | about 2 months ago | (#47090161)

Your phrasing makes it sound like it's voluntary. Mentally ill people are often unable to make choices because of their illness, and so as a result, it's not a choice, it's just doing enough to get by.

True, also mentally ill people often have trouble getting good jobs if any jobs at all. Many live on government assistance and are well below the poverty line. And it is well known that poverty is correlated with a shorter lifespan. Many simply cannot afford healthy lifestyle choices, such as nutritious food or preventive medical care.

Re:so true :| (1)

Frobnicator (565869) | about 2 months ago | (#47090895)

also mentally ill people often have trouble getting good jobs if any jobs at all

The article headline and so many of the replies, including yours, seem to just focus on a tiny subset of mental illness. STOP THE NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES

Sure, people who suffer severe and extreme levels of depression do have trouble with these things.

But mental illness covers a huge swath of conditions.

That skinny girl who has anorexia, that is a mental illness. That person who keeps his desk really neat at work has mild OCD which is a mental illness. Chances are very good that your boss or your grand-boss, and almost certainly your CEO and other executives, are all sociopaths, also a mental illness.

Dyslexia, ADD and ADHD, caffeine-induced sleep disorders, dysthymia (mild depression), stuttering, insomnia, and premature ejaculation all fit under the "mental illness" umbrella.

DON'T FEED THE STEREOTYPES. Because clearly, as you suggest men suffering from premature ejaculation due to mental issues "often have trouble getting good jobs if any jobs at all".

Nearly every human being suffers from mental illness during their life, even if it is only briefly. You wouldn't make such broad claims about other illnesses, but mental illness has such a horrible stigma in western culture it is disgusting.

Re:so true :| (1)

Livius (318358) | about 2 months ago | (#47090173)

It's not either-or. The mentally ill have *impaired* decision-making faculties. Their illness is not putting a gun to their head, just making decision-making harder than average.

Re:so true :| (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090271)

I hate to sound cold, but does it make a difference to the result? Voluntary or involuntary, poor lifestyle decisions mean a shorter lifespan.

There is a difference in the treatment, but that's not what we're talking about.

Re:so true :| (1)

germansausage (682057) | about 2 months ago | (#47090327)

Mod way up. I have a relative who has moderately severe schizophrenia. Unable to make good decisions is exactly what this condition causes. Add in some paranoid delusions and you have a person who seems perfectly ok (on a good day) but is utterly incapable of functioning in society.

Re:so true :| (2)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 months ago | (#47090345)

Mentally ill people generally don't take good care of themselves. They tend to eat worse and more irregularly, sleep odd hours, and not get to the doctor as much (for whatever reason), especially if they live by themselves and no one's looking after them.

damn! you mean, I'm both a sysadmin AND mentally ill?

I knew it. (didn't I?) oh shut up, you. no, you shut up.

Re:so true :| (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090923)

Did you just split from here?

Re:so true :| (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090511)

Get boned in the ass

Re:so true :| (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090523)

Like not paying hookers to come over?

Sounds a lot like people I know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090609)

... generally don't take good care of themselves. They tend to eat worse and more irregularly, sleep odd hours, and not get to the doctor as much (for whatever reason), especially if they live by themselves ...

Have been in the IT field for umpteenth of years and people working around me fit the description to the "T"

Sleep at odd hours ? Check !
Eating junk ? Check !
Don't take good care of themselves ?
If it means not taking regular bath, not brush teeth at least twice a day, and so on ... Check, check, check !!!
Not going to doctors ? Check !
Live by themselves ? Check !

Looks like a lot of geeks may fine themselves facing St. Michael at the pearly gate earlier than others ...

Re:Sounds a lot like people I know ... (1)

Lotana (842533) | about 2 months ago | (#47090747)

Therefore, you have to be mentally ill to work in IT! :-)

Re:Sounds a lot like people I know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090905)

Yes. It's no joke. This fields attracts outliers like crazy.

Re:so true :| (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47091083)

Any scientific work worth its paper and toner would include adjustment for what you listed. There is something extra to it: most living beings, especially those with higher cognitive functions, have embedded "choke" - they self destruct, immediately or more gradually, according to their self-decoded successfulness to achieve set goals. I will not delve into definition of those goals, but we can infer that they are mapped to hormonal and psychological (where applicable) rewards. The purpose of this system is to accelerate adaptation from generation to generation, nipping out "runts" to make more room for "fared well"-s. It is evolution beyond Darwin, genome variants auto-censoring themselves even long before it comes to the moment of ultimate test of fitness. There is couple of interesting corollaries though: when there is a low population density, this self evaluation ought to be re-calibrated and should provide boost. Also, surviving through a crisis should set the death clock back a few notches. Anecdotal (yeah, I know, isn't) evidence supports this.

Now, back to mental illnesses - most of them are adversely affecting the levels of serotonin, therefore stepping on "the choke". That affects vital functions and immune system, cutting the life short.

So, there you go - don't skip opportunities to be happy. You'll save nothing, quite the contrary.

in addition to poor choices associated with ... (4, Interesting)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about 2 months ago | (#47090043)

In addition to the poor choices associated with irrationality ... remember that these are diseases of the brain. Complex syndromes that have effects beyond behavior and thinking. For example, depression is associated with pain.

Some interesting reading: Peter Kramer's Against Depression [google.com] .

hmm could be... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090071)

...mental health patients tend to be serious smokers too, self-medicating. Anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, major depression, to name a few. (Source: was married to a psych nurse)

Re:hmm could be... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090225)

We know you are are lying now, claiming to have been married. How did you get married while living in your mom's basement?

Nonsense. (4, Insightful)

evilviper (135110) | about 2 months ago | (#47090077)

it's not clear how mental disorders could be causing early deaths.

This is a positively idiotic statement.

The mentally ill are over-represented in homeless, impoverished, drug-using (self-medicating), and other highly at-risk populations. Even with a support network, they are often unable to assist in their own care, and symptoms they describe may be attributed to excessively attributed to psychosomatic rather than physical causes. They often refuse medical care, either blanket refusal, or may specifically refuse to take one medication, or follow one bit of doctor's advice. They usually have difficulty retaining a doctor, and bounce between them, probably to progressively less-capable ones.

The reasons are "are little understood and likely to be complex," say Dr. Hoang and colleagues, but "are likely to be influenced by adverse lifestyle and social factors associated with the presence of mental illness such as alcohol and illicit drug use, and exposure to poor housing."

Re:Nonsense. (1)

PPH (736903) | about 2 months ago | (#47090313)

They also represent the majority of the people who cross the street in the middle of a block.

Re:Nonsense. (2)

Mantrid42 (972953) | about 2 months ago | (#47090699)

Your comment is completely misinformed.

From the National Institute of Mental Health:

Mental disorders are common in the United States and internationally. An estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older — about one in four adults — suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. When applied to the 2004 U.S. Census residential population estimate for ages 18 and older, this figure translates to 57.7 million people.

I don't have the figures for 2004, but I do have the figures for 2012 regarding homelessness. From the US Department of Housing and Urban Development:

On a single night in 2012 there were 633,782 homeless people in the United States[...]

Dividing by the US population in 2012 (312.8 million), we get 0.00202615728, or, 0.2%

So 26.2% of Americans are mentally ill, and 0.2% of Americans are homeless. So no, it's not a "positively idiotic statement." The mentally all are all around us, and perhaps the reason the study can't pin down why they're dying younger is because people are under the impression that you can easily spot someone who's mentally ill. Yeah, a lot of homeless people are mentally ill. But about a quarter of everyone is mentally ill, and trying to put the mentally ill into a box means that most of those people will go untreated because they'll be ashamed of their disease.

Re:Nonsense. (2)

Frobnicator (565869) | about 2 months ago | (#47090921)

Thank you!

It is amazing at how quickly people jump from the word "mental illness" to "homeless, homicidal, criminally insane."

The vast majority of humanity has a mental illness at least one in their life. It may be trouble coping with a death. It may be trouble overeating or starving yourself. Most executives, politicians, and a large number of law enforcement officers are all sociopaths. Even issues like premature ejaculation can be linked to mental illnesses, either short term or long term.

NO MORE STIGMA. "Mental illness" almost never means "homeless, homicidal, criminally insane", just like "physical illness" almost never means "hospital intensive care on life support, a living vegetable."

Mental illness can range from the equivalent of a physical illness of a cold, or a bigger infection, or a life-long treatable condition like diabetes, or it can be severe like aggressive brain cancer.

Re:Nonsense. (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 2 months ago | (#47090931)

An estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older â" about one in four adults â" suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year.

At that rate, the word loses all meaning, and I don't believe for a second that this higher mortality rate is reflected in over a quarter of the population. Instead, you're using an extremely wide definition.

Your comment is completely misinformed

No. I even quoted a relevant expert at the end of my rant, which largely supports exactly what I said.

Re:Nonsense. (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 months ago | (#47090749)

You're quite right, but there are other, more direct pathways to death that mental conditions can lead you onto. There's been a lot of research recently into how mental state interplays with normal physiology, such as the immune system. It could very well be that even in the absence of the things you're mentioning, mentally ill people are compromised when dealing with ordinary diseases, for example.

toxicity of medications (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090081)

What the researchers are ignoring is the toxicity of psychiatric (or just most) medications. People who heal themselves with the method animals use in the wild have never been shown to die during that unless they were already extremely toxic... but as for hospitals, they have a significant death rate. Of course, most people, brought up in mainstream medicine will dismiss this, but it is worth looking into and actually considering the fact of medication toxicity in these deaths, and comparing it to people who use other methods.

Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (5, Informative)

gelfling (6534) | about 2 months ago | (#47090083)

Doctors have done studies for years confirming that smoking tends to moderate SOME symptoms of schizophrenia. How rain on your wedding day is that?

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090123)

Bi-Polar people can be too. Doctors are not able to encourage sufferers to continue to smoke, but in my experience they don't discourage it either. It seems to help. (From the very small sample of Bi-Polar sufferers I can observe).

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090179)

Smoking has other benefits too that aren't widely discussed.

We should be asking if ecigarettes can achieve these same benefits without the cancer and emphysema.

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090237)

sure, roll them with pot instead of tobacco, no known maladies caused by that - even MJ overdose is characterized by red eyes and fast pulse, compare that with overdosing on anything in your medicine cabinet

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 2 months ago | (#47090293)

Doctors have done studies for years confirming that smoking tends to moderate SOME symptoms of schizophrenia. How rain on your wedding day is that?

As does alcohol. It is thought that many alcoholics are mild schizophrenics trying to suppress their symptoms.

As for the dangers of smoking, I sort of have to laugh

Thorazine side effects

Sedation, somnolence Weight gain, hypotension, spasms, Drug induved ParkinsonismParkinsonism, the winner - Tardive Dyskinesia

Haloperidol

All the above, plus it can nuke your liver. Elderly patients 1.7 times more likely to die, Produces neurotoxic metabolites, possible carcinogen (though difficult to assess)

The same drugs that treat the mentally ill are in general, nasty-ass stuff

And Slashdotters are all agape that these people might smoke?

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 months ago | (#47090879)

Tardive Dyskinesia

Refresh my memory, please!

Was he a death star commander, or did he marry a Stark?

 

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (1)

jblues (1703158) | about 2 months ago | (#47090399)

AFAIK, nicotine acts in a similar fashion to monamine oxidise inhibitor (MAO) mood stabilizers. It can be administered as required, and the dose easily controlled. I wonder if we could get the same benefits by vaping, while losing some of the negative health consequences?

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (2)

blackraven14250 (902843) | about 2 months ago | (#47090653)

It's not the nicotine. There's naturally occurring substances in tobacco that are MAOI's. That's probably why a lot of people aren't able to switch to vaping. For me personally, it's most noticeable when drinking - a real cigarette is far more satisfying, even though totally sober vaping does it for me.

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47090473)

Nicotine is a drug with significant CNS effects. Why do you think so many people take it? No surprise that it can be beneficial for some.

It's just that the delivery system is problematic.

Re:Schizophrenics are HEAVY smokers (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47090621)

The problem of the delivery system goes easily away if they use nicotine therapy products instead of smoking cigarettes.

Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 months ago | (#47090103)

Since the most recent Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Psychiatry says that essentially all of us are mentally ill, WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!! AAAAAAAHHHHHHGGGHHHH!!!

Re:Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (2)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about 2 months ago | (#47090215)

Dude, no one gets out alive. Ever.

Re:Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 months ago | (#47090625)

Yes, I know they say nobody lives forever.

As long as the curve approaches infinity, I'll be happy to be well down the long end of it.

Re:Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 2 months ago | (#47090295)

Since the most recent Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Psychiatry says that essentially all of us are mentally ill, WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!! AAAAAAAHHHHHHGGGHHHH!!!

The older I get, the more I realize they might have a point.

Re:Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47090491)

We are all mentally ill to one extent or another, we all will die.

As far as the DSM folks are concerned those are billable episodes. Your credit card, please.

Re:Hmmm... Seen DSM5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090521)

I burnt one!!

Capitalism... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090121)

... is at root cause for many mental illnesses because it doesn't respect the evolutionary landscape (high energy vs low energy people, sensitive vs hardy, etc). I'd bet money on the fact that the source of depression and other mental illnesses has to do with evolutionary mismatch against high stress modern environments.

Re:Capitalism... (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 2 months ago | (#47090233)

I doubt that.

http://www.webmd.com/mental-he... [webmd.com]

There are probably reasons but it will not be as obvious as that. Some of these countries have real reasons to be depressed or suffer anxiety disorders and yet score low in a survey by the WHO. Japan for instance has numbers so low the research said it is unbelievable and it is highly capitalist.

Not an absolute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090141)

My grandmother was mean, smoked and nuts. She lived to 96 years old. Good thing she didn't live a healthy life or we would still be stuck with her! Everyone was glad when Death finally gave in and took her. I think he was scared of her.

Medication (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090145)

Many medications for the mentally ill can drastically shorten life span.

Re:Medication (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47090229)

Citation?

Re:Medication (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090341)

http://www.cchrflorida.org/blo... [cchrflorida.org] ,for one

Re:Medication (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 months ago | (#47090733)

Wow, anecdotal evidence. You do realize that not all mentally ill people are being medicated, because there's plenty of conditions for which there is no medication?

Angry People v. The Happy n' Crazy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090147)

Well maybe it will if you worry about it. So don't! Plenty of crazy people live loooooonnnnnnnngggggggg lives. They just don't give a shit and their HAPPY. The miserable always want to see the happy, shitty. Hence the study :-P

This is new? (3, Insightful)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about 2 months ago | (#47090195)

Seriously, this shouldn't be a surprise. Mental illness can include and/or lead to anorexia, compulsive overeating, apathy and depression leading to sedentary lifestyle, suicide, dangerous risk taking behavior, homelessness, poor nutrition, drug abuse including excessive smoking and drinking, and taking lots of prescribed medications.

"Funded by Wellcome Foundation" (3, Informative)

storkus (179708) | about 2 months ago | (#47090219)

If the name doesn't ring a bell to younger Western audiences (and not to be confused with an Asian supermarket chain, apparently), it is now part of Glaxo-SmithKline (GSK):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G... [wikipedia.org]

Sigh (2)

sleepypsycho (1335401) | about 2 months ago | (#47090285)

Yet another thing to be depressed about...

why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (1, Interesting)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 2 months ago | (#47090347)

Why do people insist on studying, helping, fixing the mentally ill or the drug abusers? What about those who are "healthy" but run into unfortunate events (car crash, cancer, getting laid off)? If we're going to treat society as a single organism, wouldn't we want to give to the most capable rather than the least? Where is this constant need to fix people coming from?

Re:why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (5, Informative)

sleepypsycho (1335401) | about 2 months ago | (#47090455)

A number of reasons
1) Basic human compassion
2) Mentally ill and drug abusers affect the healthy. Drug crime is rampant with a high cost to society. Even if all drugs were legalized, as I believe they should be, there would be still a heavy price, just as with alcoholism. These would include car crashes, unemployment, failed businesses, etc that you mention.
3) As someone with depression, it seems worth fixing.
4) Mental illness is just that, an illness.Why do you draw a distinction between cancer and mental illness. How is someone with cancer "healthy"?

Re:why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (2)

osu-neko (2604) | about 2 months ago | (#47090561)

Why do people insist on studying, helping, fixing the mentally ill or the drug abusers?

Healthy human compassion.

What about those who are "healthy" but run into unfortunate events (car crash, cancer, getting laid off)?

We care for them too.

If we're going to treat society as a single organism, wouldn't we want to give to the most capable rather than the least?

That would be a false dilemma. If the two options were mutually exclusive, what you said would make sense. As it is, what you said is just idiotic.

Where is this constant need to fix people coming from?

Again, basic human compassion. You should try it sometime...

Re:why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090727)

Many mentally ill and drug abusers were "healthy" and ran into unfortunate events.

Re:why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090799)

I've lived and travelled abroad long enough to see that people are people - essentially the same everywhere in the world.

But people have vastly different economic opportunities depending which countries they are born into. In some countries, poverty is rare and temporary: a person of ordinary ability can relatively easily find meaningful work that pays enough to live comfortably. In other countries, poverty is common and almost impossible to escape: what few jobs are available pay so little that even basic necessities are unaffordable. Fundamentally, an economy can only consume as much as it produces. If most people in an economy don't have productive jobs then it will be impossible for most people to have a comfortable level of consumption. So, yes, figuring out how to structure an economy to provide productive jobs to ordinary people is one of the most important questions facing humanity.

But it's a false dichotomy to say that we can't also help people with mental illness and addiction. One thing that's striking about the USA, for example, is how many people have far more than they need - huge houses, multiple late model high-end SUV's, designer handbags, etc. Sure, we could have a productive economy that is mostly producing luxury goods for a handful of ultra-rich. But we don't have to: we could also have a productive economy that provides almost everyone with a comfortable living and also makes progress toward solving the big problems of the world - poverty, disease, conflict.

Re:why the focus on being your brother's keeper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090857)

Why do people insist on studying, helping, fixing the mentally ill or the drug abusers? What about those who are "healthy" but run into unfortunate events (car crash, cancer, getting laid off)? If we're going to treat society as a single organism, wouldn't we want to give to the most capable rather than the least? Where is this constant need to fix people coming from?

Unless you propose leaving them to die on the street (which I'm getting a strong whiff of) or imprisoning them, those people are going to exist somewhere and have a cost. Helping the capable the opportunity to be their best does not preclude helping the weak; it is both less expensive to society and also fosters the kind of culture that is worth living in.

Smokeres lose 13.4 years not 8 (1)

jblues (1703158) | about 2 months ago | (#47090391)

As I understand it, heavy smokers lose ~13.4 years and not 8-10 as the article quotes. Is the shorter life span due to the side-effects of medication?

certificate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090451)

is that why the expired slashdot certificate still has not been updated?

Connecting to slashdot.org (slashdot.org)|216.34.181.45|:443... connected.
ERROR: cannot verify slashdot.org's certificate, issued by â/C=US/O=GeoTrust, Inc./CN=GeoTrust SSL CAâ(TM):
    Issued certificate has expired.

Some effect as well as some cause (1)

sleepypsycho (1335401) | about 2 months ago | (#47090493)

Poor health can contribute to or directly relate to mental illness. Some in the study probably suffered from other illness but were not diagnosed. It must be just fraction of the measurement but it might be an important one.

"Reduces"? Really (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090503)

I don't believe it's possible to assign cause/effect with such studies. The headline should read "Mental illness assoicated with reduced lifespan"

Smoking marijuana affects mental health too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090541)

This is a good time to point out that many studies have drawn links between marijuana use and depression (worsening with chronic use) paranoia, schizophrenia, risk of psychotic episodes and prolonged psychosis. It's no wonder that many mentally ill people self-medicate with marijuana which provides temporary relief but exacerbates their conditions in the long run.

I mention this because drug advocates commonly claim that smoking marijuana is safer than smoking tobacco, and while the lack of nicotine negates a cancer risk, marijuana is by no means safe for your mental well being.

And hey, there's always the simplest option: don't smoke anything. There's a reason we attribute long life and good health to "clean living".

Still alive (1)

cute_orc (2911555) | about 2 months ago | (#47090579)

I have OCD and Hypochondria and it is badly affecting my life. But slowly and steadily I am getting out of it. Never went for any medication. No one even knows about it except my family.

Medication? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090593)

Diagnosed mentally ill people tend to get psychopharmaceutic medication, stuff that kidneys and liver have a hard time dealing with intentionally since it needs to accumulate and thus maintain a somewhat constant level in the bloodstream.

So how many of those deaths are attributable to liver or renal failure?

BOLLOCKS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090611)

Anyone who doesn't know GOD and is living in sin has mental illness whether they know it or not. So don't let some poor soul with a lot of authority tell you you're sick. And don't let someone suicide you out without giving them the fight of their life.

Phishing: TFA is helpful as life insurance disinformation only, very suspect indeed; always an agenda. So dismantle the VA you dx, guaranteed to turn it into a complete debacle, dissing countless veterans who served this country faithfully. What a scam, having experienced the administration of outlanders prying into my medical records illegally and without consent, 2blocking doctors and always trying to hang me with my own words, short leashed my entire adult life. The n0w0 no doubt.

Medications (1)

strstr (539330) | about 2 months ago | (#47090677)

There are numerous articles about the medications causing the deaths and illnesses.

Essentially mental health drugs are a death sentence and aren't effective once prescribed, and prevent recovery.

The number tied to it is 25 years average early death DUE to the mental health drugs. Not because of the persons mental illness.

die 25 years sooner thanks to antipsychotics, article originally hosted on government website: http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

want to prevent recovery from schizophrenia? take an antipsychotic and lose your chance: http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net] (people not taking the drugs recover at rates above 40%, whereas users recover at less than 5%): http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

The United Nations and World Health Organization both classify forced medications as a form of torture for a reason. Get those reports and more on the deadly effects of not just mental health drugs but also pharmaceuticals in general (on average, 100,000 people died when this study was published back in 2000 PER YEAR from correctly prescribed non-side effect issues of medications): http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

FTFY (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090703)

Medications Commonly Prescribed For Mental Illness Reduce Lifespans As Much as Smoking

One word... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 months ago | (#47090725)

Psychoneuroimmunology. (Yeah, it's a long one.)

Old Research (1)

elbonia (2452474) | about 2 months ago | (#47090737)

This isn't anything new [psychcentral.com] . Also people with epilepsy have it particularly bad [ox.ac.uk]

medications and other causes of early death.. (2)

strstr (539330) | about 2 months ago | (#47090741)

this study is terrible because the psychiatrist has not actually
    linked the issue to mental illness and he doesn't mention once mental
    health drugs causing the problems. in fact studies have been done that
    show it's mental health drugs causing a drop in the average life
    expectancy by 25 years on average:
http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

    also a study done and published in the American Medical Association
    showed that on average pharamacuticels were causing 100,000 deaths per
    year when correctly prescribed and not due to side effect issues or
    misprescribing:
http://themindunleashed.org/20... [themindunleashed.org]

    Direct link to study publication:
http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

    Anti-anxiety and sleep aids are also tied to causing a 17.5% increased
    chance for instant death in your sleep, as well as increases in
    cancer. In these two studies:
http://www.thedailybeast.com/a... [thedailybeast.com]
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/... [huffingtonpost.com]

  There's a reason the United Nations and World Health Organization also
  are calling for a ban on forced psychiatric treatment and consider
  treatment forms of torture:
http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]
http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]
http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]
http://oregonstatehospital.net... [oregonstatehospital.net]

  Scientists "Antipsychotic drugs are schizophrenia's hidden gulag":
http://www.newscientist.com/ar... [newscientist.com]

    Drugs like Prozac also cause a 12 fold increase in risk of suicide and
    homicidal tendencies. Zyprexa also causes mania in bipolar people and
    induces first time psychotic episodes. How could it not be that when
    all this is known they don't mention it once in an article about
    people with mental illness having reduced life spans?

  More articles and videos about medications causing severe illness and
  the over diagnosing of people. BTW, another cause of death for people
  with mental illness is the chronic abuse and neglect they face in
  forced treatment programs and treatment in general, and also
  experimentation and abuse by the government. More details on this
  here: http://www.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

  Documentary video covering the abusive history of psychiatry here:
http://cdn.oregonstatehospital... [oregonstatehospital.net]

    Looks like the study linking the drop in life expectancy to mental
    illness and recommending that people receive medications as treatment
    is heavily flawed. :)

  -Todd Giffen
  405 W Centennial BLVD
  Springfield, OR 97477
503-967-5202
  Learn about mind invasive weaponry on a world wide scale. Another
  source of mental patients covert assassinations.
http://www.obamasweapon.com/ [obamasweapon.com]

Funded by http://muengineering.in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090793)

Stressed life is more dangerous and harmful than smoking

http://muengineering.in

This is a long time and well known issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090803)

I've been working with SED and SMPI clients as a Crisis Case Manager and supervisor for 13 years. This is very well known. Factors include mentally ill people are much less likely to seek medical services, more likely to be poor, usually impulsive, lack access to or knowledge of services other than medical, often have less family and social supports, some psychotropic drugs are very hard on the liver and other organs, often self medicate with alcohol or illicit/prescription drugs, the list goes on and on. Oh, and dual diagnosis play a part in this too (addiction/mental illness).

As a side note, now and again when I hear someone make comments that they feel it's unfair that mentally ill people shouldn't get SSI or SSDI benefits because they are just lazy, I think to myself that I wouldn't trade places with most of them for anything. ANYTHING. I've seem people in their 40's with bodies of a 70 year old and minds of a 10 year old living in 2nd and sometimes 3rd world conditions. SSDI/SSI/Medicaid benefits do help but not much. After rentand food there usually isn't much left, if any. Now and again we are able to find jobs for our clients but it's not easy finding a job for a 40 year old bipolar alcoholic with an IQ of 70 with a limited work history.

Mental illness and short lifespan .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47090839)

"A new meta study from researchers at Oxford concludes that mental illness is just as big a factor in shortening lives"

The main cause in shortening the lives of the mentally ill is the cocktail of toxic chemicals that they are forced to take by the mental health profession. These cause, as an example, loss of concentration, memory loss, thyroid problems, type two diabetes, obesity, heart failure and so on. The cure these types of drugs provide is that; the patent is so preoccupied in not falling down or shitting themselves, they're not a bother to anyone ..
--

The site's security certificate has expired!

Miracle I am still alive (1)

vikingpower (768921) | about 2 months ago | (#47090911)

Reading the actual paper I thought: "Wow. Should have been dead by now".

buh (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 2 months ago | (#47091087)

Another attempt by the Criminal Democratic Party to justify stealing money. It won't work. Anyone still believing the leftist ideas is beyond help.
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