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Efforts To Turn Elephants Into Woolly Mammoths Are Already Underway

Soulskill posted about 5 months ago | from the still-waiting-on-a-mammoth-steak dept.

Science 147

Jason Koebler writes: "Researchers are working to hybridize existing animals with extinct ones in order to create a '2.0' version of the animal. Using a genome editing technique known as CRISPR, Harvard synthetic biologist George Church has successfully migrated three genes, which gave the woolly mammoth its furry appearance, extra layer of fat, and cold-resistant blood, into the cells of Asian elephants, with the idea of eventually making a hybrid embryo. In theory, given what we know about both the woolly mammoth genome and the Asian elephant genome, the final product will be something that more closely resembles the former than the latter."

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Misguided (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47060961)

Shouldn't they be concentrating on turning Americans into decent people instead?

Re:Misguided (1)

BitterOak (537666) | about 5 months ago | (#47061003)

Shouldn't they be concentrating on turning Americans into decent people instead?

There's no reason they can't do both. Things they learn from this experiment may indeed some day be used to improve the human race. (Don't know why you specifically pick on Americans though.)

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061073)

We've actually diverged into two peoples.. American-Eloi and American-Morlocks.. so we have actually evolved you see.

Re:Misguided (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061009)

"furry appearance, extra layer of fat"

Sounds like they are trying to make more Americans

Re:Misguided (2)

jc42 (318812) | about 5 months ago | (#47061207)

Shouldn't they be concentrating on turning Americans into decent people instead?

Nah; they don't have any fossil DNA from humans or other critters known to be decent.

But we can look forward to Americans who are furry and have an extra layer of fat. And this can be exported to any other part of the world where there's a market for such people.

Re:Misguided (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 5 months ago | (#47061409)

Shouldn't they be concentrating on turning Americans into decent people instead?

Nah; they don't have any fossil DNA from humans or other critters known to be decent.

But we can look forward to Americans who are furry and have an extra layer of fat. And this can be exported to any other part of the world where there's a market for such people.

Oh yeah, because the average bearded fat-ass is so desirable today to the rest of the world.

Americans cornered the market on obesity. If there was value there, believe me we would have capitalized on it years ago.

Re:Misguided (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061591)

Actually, saudi arabia, kuwait, & UAE have higher rates of obesity.

>tfw america isn't even #1 in being fat anymore
sadfrog.jpg

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062907)

More bacon on them, and the beards provide needed dental floss.

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062319)

[...] we can look forward to Americans who are furry and have an extra layer of fat.

So... Greek?

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061335)

no matter how many times i log in and give you all my mod points i can't seem to get it above -1
dammit

but seriously that project sounds futile, we should just do what they do, and install a new government they had no choice on claim we freed them from oppressive regime, take what is rightfully theirs, and then expect them to like it. THEN when it looks bleak for them and they start praying in public we can arrest them strip them naked and humiliate them appropriately for expressing free will

Re:Misguided (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062283)

I think they should focus on breeding stupidity, viciousness, greed, and arrogance out of Europeans first.

If you look at the past few centuries of world history, these European "qualities" are clearly far bigger problems for the work than American "indecency".

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062945)

If you look at the past few centuries of world history, these European "qualities" were clearly far bigger problems for the work than American "indecency".

There i fixed that for you

but if you look past the last few centuries and look at the present its all you assholes,

but while we're at it lets look back what other awesome great things is america responsible for,
mass slavery of black people CHECK
Concentration camps CHECK (Remember no not those ones you had your own but hey who remembers that the japanese don't matter right?)
stripping afghan men naked and torturing them then posting videos on line CHE... wait that wasnt centuries old was it thats still how you behave..

fuck you america

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063013)

seriously... do you not realize that Americans are mostly the descendants of Europeans. All that you speak of from centuries past lives on in the current generation of Americans only add a dash of self entitlement and a smidge of gluttony and we're there

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063075)

And the bombs... don't forget the bombs bitch.

really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063023)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

everyone's guilty but some are more guilty than others...

Re: Misguided (1)

Yaztromo (655250) | about 5 months ago | (#47063019)

It's been done. They called the result "Canadians". Yaz

Re:Misguided (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063121)

Given the technology, we would probably end up breeding more Koch brothers.

Re:Misguided (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 5 months ago | (#47063281)

They are trying something easy first.

Better idea (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47060965)

Where's my cat-girl?

Re:Better idea (1)

jc42 (318812) | about 5 months ago | (#47061251)

The next project will attempt to bring back the sabre-tooth cat.

Re:Better idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062847)

Great! The second use of this knowledge: furries!

Re:Better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063285)

Would you say no to her [northarc.com] ?

Bad timing? (4, Insightful)

daemonhunter (968210) | about 5 months ago | (#47061023)

Maybe we shouldn't be making woolly mammoths just now, with climate change and all that apocalyptic-ness right around the corner.

Just sayin'.

Re:Bad timing? (4, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47061275)

Maybe we shouldn't be making woolly mammoths just now, with climate change and all that apocalyptic-ness right around the corner.

There will be plenty of prime mammoth habitat. Although tundra is turning into taiga, plenty of formerly glaciated areas are turning into tundra. For instance, the mammoths could live in Greenland, which was completely covered with ice the last time mammoths were around, but already has some areas with commercial reindeer herds.

Re:Bad timing? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061421)

Lets look back at the records. As the mammoth population declined, temperature increased. Obviously we need more mammoths.

Re: Bad timing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063133)

"Insightful?" Mods are drunk, it's clearly a funny.

Re:Bad timing? (1)

azcoyote (1101073) | about 5 months ago | (#47062229)

Nah, they'll be perfect when nuclear winter comes around. ;o)

Re:Bad timing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062331)

That was so 2012... I personally think they should try to recreate the giant sloths, because they'd make the syfy show where ""evil corp builds them, they get out of hand and we kill them all with bombs or technology" so much easier...

Re:Bad timing? (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#47062671)

Maybe we shouldn't be making woolly mammoths just now, with climate change and all that apocalyptic-ness right around the corner.

Just sayin'.

It depends. Did they find the genes that make them tasty?

so... (1)

JustNiz (692889) | about 5 months ago | (#47061025)

why are they doing this?

Re:so... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061063)

why are they doing this?

The simplest answer?

Because some idiot paid for it.

Unfortunately, that "idiot" is usually a taxpayer that sure as hell didn't get a vote.

Re:so... (3, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47061115)

Because some idiot paid for it. Unfortunately, that "idiot" is usually a taxpayer that sure as hell didn't get a vote.

I heard it was paid for someone called John Hammond, a billionaire CEO.

Re:so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061359)

By God, I had to get halfway down the page before the first Jurassic Park reference. Thank you, ArcadeMan.

Re:so... (2)

gbkersey (649921) | about 5 months ago | (#47061091)

For the circus of course....

More "tradition medicine viagra" to sell ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061123)

why are they doing this?

Its funded by "traditional medicine" merchants. The poachers will soon have killed off the real elephants for their ivory tusks so a replacement is needed. Might as well use mammoths rather than modern elephants since the mammoths will have larger tusks, more ivory to harvest, more "tradition medicine viagra" to sell.

Re:More "tradition medicine viagra" to sell ... (1)

youngatheart (1922394) | about 5 months ago | (#47062613)

You know what, I wish you were right.

There is little that I would enjoy more than seeing biological and ecosystem diversity empowered by the ignorant and foolish.

The idea of a world where rainforests and rhinos are abundant as a direct result of stupid people putting their money into funding it makes me so giddy that my cynicism filter cuts in.

Re:so... (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47061267)

Umm.. 'cause we can?

Re:so... (4, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47061323)

why are they doing this?

Why not? Where elephants live, they are a keystone species [wikipedia.org] . They preserve the savanna by knocking down trees, and they dig waterholes that are used by many other animals. Once they are gone from a region, the entire ecosystem can drastically change. It is likely that mammoths had a similar effect in the arctic.

Re:so... (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 5 months ago | (#47061545)

Indian elephants..

You're describing African elephants.

Re:so... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 5 months ago | (#47063057)

With all due respect, what you said is correct but unrelated to his point. He was saying mammoths could have an important effect in the arctic region. You may not agree with what he says, but at least read it before replying!

Re:so... (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | about 5 months ago | (#47062881)

If we have Mammoth DNA why take parts of it? Why not just clone the entire creature? If there are gaps in the DNA string could we not fill them with elephant DNA?

Re:so... (1)

1u3hr (530656) | about 5 months ago | (#47063063)

That would be replacing thousands of elephant genes with identical, possibly damaged, mammoth genes, instead of just the few that are different.

Re:so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47063151)

Because that's not a thing that real scientists can do yet.

Re:so... (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 5 months ago | (#47061351)

Because the current elephant steak is lean and overcooks easily, the extra layer of fat being the operative advantage. Why eat a dry steak?

And don't get me started on the wooly hair... there won't be much of it at first, but they'll be more than a few 1st class passengers on Kuwait Airways willing to snuggle down with a trademarked Ultra Wooly Throw.

Re:so... (1)

wulper (788005) | about 5 months ago | (#47061405)

because they can?

Re:so... (1)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | about 5 months ago | (#47061571)

To piss off the whiny Michael Crichtons still left in the world.

Re:so... (3, Informative)

flyingsquid (813711) | about 5 months ago | (#47061587)

The whole plan seems pretty sketchy. You can't just create a mashup of two distantly related animals and automatically expect to get something viable out of the mix. Mammoths and Asian elephants aren't actually that closely related- African elephant, Asian elephant, and mammoth are thought to have diverged around six million years ago, so mammoths are about as close to Asian elephants as chimps are to humans.

Hybridization can result in improved fitness if the parents aren't too distantly related. However, the more distant the relationship between the parents, the less likely the offspring are to be viable. Humans and Neanderthals split around 600,000 years ago and were able to successfully interbreed. However, horses and asses split around four million years ago. The offspring- mules and hinnies- are healthy, but they are either sterile or have reduced fertility. Breeding more distantly related animals produces non-viable offspring.

The article does mention that there have been hybrids between Asian and African elephants, which are slightly more distantly related than Asian elephant and mammoth. What the article neglects to mention is that the only known example of an African-Asian hybrid died several weeks after birth; there are other reports of hybrids being born but strikingly no reports of any surviving. This suggests that mixing mammoth and Asian elephant DNA is going to produce an unhealthy or non-viable offspring.

Crossbreeding vs. Genetic Engineering (4, Informative)

aNonnyMouseCowered (2693969) | about 5 months ago | (#47062149)

What you're talking about is basically natural crossbreeding, not the type of genetic engineering that involves modifying the DNA itself of an organism. By "natural" I include such mechanical techniques as artificial insemination, extracting the sperm and eggs from mature adults and mixing them up. With natural crossbreeding you get the whole shebang, you let nature decide which genes become active and dominant. In theory, with DNA level genetic engineering you can specify which traits you want to get. I'm not saying this is a good thing, only that you can potentially get more control by "editing" (the word used in the article) the genes that simpy mixing the semen and egg of two different species.

Re:so... (2)

youngatheart (1922394) | about 5 months ago | (#47062629)

It doesn't make me angry that people have tried to create greater biological diversity, it makes me sad that they have failed. If they fail, then I will be sad, but if they succeed then I will be happy that the world holds something amazing which might help lead to the development of a world where rhinos and mammoths contribute to something even better: a world where the mistakes of our ancestors can be mended.

GMO Mammoth Burgers! (1)

Irate Engineer (2814313) | about 5 months ago | (#47061083)

Really though, we're trying to genetically resurrect an animal that died off likely due to human depredation and the end of the ice age. Now there are 7 billion MORE humans and the earth is getting warmer.

Way to jam a genetically square peg into a round hole.

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (2)

mrxak (727974) | about 5 months ago | (#47061139)

I would definitely be interested to learn what mammoths tasted like.

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (3, Informative)

wiggles (30088) | about 5 months ago | (#47061217)

Probably similar to bison [jhbuffalomeat.com] - the only real ice age megafauna left.

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061293)

By that reasoning, every large land mammal from the ice age tasted like bison?

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (1)

wiggles (30088) | about 5 months ago | (#47061381)

You got it!

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (1)

jxander (2605655) | about 5 months ago | (#47061689)

Or chicken.

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (1)

Irate Engineer (2814313) | about 5 months ago | (#47061283)

You can still get frozen mammoth in the Siberian tundra, while supplies last!

<URL:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2358695/Woolly-mammoth-frozen-Siberia-39-000-YEARS-goes-display-Tokyo-woolly.html/>

Re: GMO Mammoth Burgers! (3, Funny)

jd2112 (1535857) | about 5 months ago | (#47061489)

But they are all several thousand years past their "Best if used by" date.

Re:GMO Mammoth Burgers! (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 5 months ago | (#47061329)

Yeah, but I'd totally go to the zoo to see a mammoth, and with two young kids I am zooed out.

Doesn't anyone remember that song by Loverboy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061137)

Mammoth and elephant DNA just won't splice!

Obligatory (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47061175)

Where's my elephant? - Bart Simpson

Finally! (2, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about 5 months ago | (#47061185)

One step closer to the egg-laying wool-milk-pig.

Times sure are changing (5, Interesting)

tulcod (1056476) | about 5 months ago | (#47061237)

When Intel buys or invents some kind of a new chip process, everyone applauds. When engineers use 3D printing to save a crippled boy's life, everyone celebrates technology. Stick an arduino in a tumor and people scream in ecstasy.

But when the item of cloning comes in the news, suddenly people back away and ask what it's all good for. Because us humans are not allowed to mess with that.

Come on people. We invested thousands of years trying to understand the tricks of physics and evolution. We have now got to a stage where we can apply these tricks ourselves and see what we can make of the world.

Will it turn out for the better? Absolutely nobody knows. But telling scientists not to mess with this takes us back to the middle ages, where scientific incentives were influenced heavily by religious and cultural beliefs.

Let us show ourselves that we no longer need that. This is the time to end that society of religion and culture. Messing with life, and bringing back the extinct, those are exactly the kind of things that go against all rules of religion that we have adhered to for the past x thousands years. Humans are the new god on planet earth (and beyond?).

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about 5 months ago | (#47061667)

Because if we fuck up playing with genetics we could wipe out the human race overnight. Or create species that we can't get rid of and end up replacing good species that we want.

I'm waiting for T-Rex island and dodos, they look cool. but no more... except triceratops.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#47062223)

Or create species that we can't get rid of and end up replacing good species that we want.

Not a problem. They make this sticky paper you can leave around. Come back in a while and all the mammoths will be stuck to it. Then just throw in garbage.

Re:Times sure are changing (4, Funny)

russotto (537200) | about 5 months ago | (#47062351)

Or create species that we can't get rid of and end up replacing good species that we want.

Not to worry, come winter.... OH SHIT THAT DOESN'T WORK WITH MAMMOTHS!

Re:Times sure are changing (2)

youngatheart (1922394) | about 5 months ago | (#47062651)

We're already doing things that could wipe out the human race overnight. We're already dealing with pythons in the Everglades and zebra mussel epidemics. We've wiped out mammoths, passenger pigeons and very nearly the rhino.

If we can take steps toward showing the world what we've lost by introducing something that will demonstrate how valuable the species we've wiped out were, then I'm a happy camper. (I'll be camping in a kevlar tent with my rifle handy if we manage to reintroduce dire wolves and saber-tooth tigers, but I'll be happy doing it.)

Mammut good (2)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 5 months ago | (#47063203)

Or create species that we can't get rid of

This is why you start with Mammoth. It's not like you are going to misplace them, or walk out our BSL2 with one stuck to our shirt. And we know they are habitat limited and that we can hunt them to extinction.

But seriously, we genetically engineer lab mice and rats all the time, even hybridising them with human genes, and no-one bats an eyelash. This is the same process, just using elephants with specific mammoth genes.

Re:Times sure are changing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061867)

It's not because of religion that I'm against this. It's because maybe there's a damn good reason something went extinct. Bringing anything "back" is likely to have unforeseen consequences. I don't see that any good that can be gained is worth the risk.

I don't believe in God. Any god. But I do believe that plenty of humans are damn assholes who think they know more than they do, and fucking around with stuff just because you can is a damn good way to learn precisely what "hubris" is.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

the biologist (1659443) | about 5 months ago | (#47063247)

the "damn good reason" mammoths went extinct seems to be that we ate them.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

anarkhos (209172) | about 5 months ago | (#47061877)

Wow, check out the hubris on this guy

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about 5 months ago | (#47061973)

In all of your examples where people are happy with technology we understand the science and have had time to come to grips with the consequences of our actions. However that is not the case when we blindly throw genes from one species into another. Just because we have the ability to do something doesn't mean that we have the knowledge to use it appropriately.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

binarstu (720435) | about 5 months ago | (#47062011)

Although you seem to think that the debate about genetic experimentation is nothing more than a conflict between science religion, I assure you that is not the case.

"Messing with life", as you call it, has an incredible potential for doing harm if approached carelessly. It doesn't take much imagination to realize this, either: synthetic infectious agents, engineered organisms that displace natural diversity, and so on.

You state, "Humans are the new god on planet earth (and beyond?)." If you really believe that, than surely you must agree that responsibility and caution need to be part of that job description. Science does not, and never should, exist outside of ethical debate.

Re:Times sure are changing (5, Insightful)

radtea (464814) | about 5 months ago | (#47062181)

"Messing with life", as you call it, has an incredible potential for doing harm if approached carelessly. It doesn't take much imagination to realize this, either: synthetic infectious agents, engineered organisms that displace natural diversity, and so on.

You've missed the GP's point, and created an instance of his observation.

There is almost nothing we do that doesn't have "an incredible potential to do harm", and ubiquitous computational intelligence is one of the most obvious candidates for that fear going... yet hardly anyone is afraid of it.

Ubiquitous computational intelligence (UCI) has the potential to put everyone under constant observation, including position tracking. It has the potential to serve ads to you in your sleep, monitor your caloric intake, keep track and report your alcohol consumption, your masturbation habits... everything. It's Orwell's telescreens on steroids.

Yet the response to such things on /., while sometimes somewhat skeptical, is mostly positive. Relatively minor messing with the genome of some fairly rare creature, on the other hand, brings out the panic, with flat-out bizarre, anti-Darwinian statements like "these things died out for a reason" (posted by an AC above, who makes points similar to yours.)

Sure messing with genomes carries risks, but they are comparable to the risks we take with all kinds of technological development, and yet for some reason people seem a lot more sensitive to them. It may not be explicitly religious, but it sure isn't rational.

Re:Times sure are changing (3, Interesting)

binarstu (720435) | about 5 months ago | (#47062999)

And you've missed my point. Perhaps I didn't explain myself well.

I absolutely do not disagree that plenty of people have an irrational fear of genetic technologies. Nor do I disagree that we have lots of other ways to screw the world up (you mention the example of massive automated surveillance). And I wasn't arguing that we shouldn't try to resurrect a mammoth.

The GP seemed to me to be making the argument that 1) negative reaction to "messing with life" is because of antiquated religious sensibilities; and 2) we're gods now, so we should just do whatever the heck we want. I don't find either part of that argument compelling. As for part 1, casting any and all opposition to unbridled genetic experimentation as nothing but religious or cultural fanatacism is a straw man argument, pure and simple. There are lots of very rational reasons to proceed cautiously with certain kinds of genetic experimentation (and plenty of scientists agree with me). Why part 2 is wrong shouldn't require any further explanation, and other commenters have already addressed it.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#47062265)

But when the item of cloning comes in the news, suddenly people back away and ask what it's all good for. Because us humans are not allowed to mess with that.

And then there's the people who buy SUVs and have them lowered. What's up with that?

Don't worry about it. Haters gonna hate.

Re:Times sure are changing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062529)

You seem to believe people are against this because it's cloning and there is some sort of religious uneasiness. Most responses here indicate that people are against this because there is absolutely no use for a brand new woolly mammoth. They belong to a long-dead version of the ecosystem. They died off long before a slew of other animals that man is more responsible for eliminating. There are plenty of other animals that should probably be the subject of dedicated conservation efforts long before the extinct mammoth. When they say things like, "we could have herds of woolly mammoths back in the Arctic," in strongly signals to me that they are big on ambition and short on planning.

Re:Times sure are changing (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | about 5 months ago | (#47062897)

I have no problem with reviving lost species, though more recent ones might be a better fit. There is plenty of cold arctic tundra where mammoth could live though they might have to share with starving polar bears due to global warming. What you should be scared of is someone genetically modifying apes by adding human DNA, for the purpose of breeding factory workers that can be owned instead of getting paid.

Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061249)

Nothing could possibly go wrong.

I for one... (4, Funny)

Schaffner (183973) | about 5 months ago | (#47061265)

I for one welcome our new hybridized mammoth overlords!

Come on, you know you wanted to post this first.

Re: I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061411)

Gets me everytime. Thanks for the laugh.

How to create a wooly mammoth: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061341)

1 Rub giant balloon on elephant
2 Walk it through my house
3 have a wooly mammoth
4 (optional) help me move to other location, thanks a lot
no profit, sorry.

i want a carnivorous bunny (0)

maliqua (1316471) | about 5 months ago | (#47061389)

That would be way cooler than a fat hair elephant

Re:i want a carnivorous bunny (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47061419)

I think you've watched Monty Python and the Holy Grail too many times.

Re:i want a carnivorous bunny (3, Informative)

maliqua (1316471) | about 5 months ago | (#47061473)

Watching Monty python too many times is an asymptote i can only get infinitely close to watching it too many times

Just let me know (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 5 months ago | (#47061523)

Just let me know when I can buy a mammoth steak for the BBQ. Sounds tasty. :P

Fitting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061531)

Fat hair elephants, made by fat hair elephants for fat hairy elephants

Furry Elephants in a hotter world? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061569)

We are making elephants more resistant to cold, just as they don't really need it anymore.

Global Warming (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061655)

Maybe they should ask the elephants if this is a good idea before they strap on a wool coat to their DNS.

Re:Global Warming (1)

0x537461746943 (781157) | about 5 months ago | (#47061713)

That is precisely what I was thinking... Global warming... making elephants more resistant to cold... They are going the wrong way... It seems like the are doing it just to do it and not for a real reason to do it.

Re:Global Warming (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 5 months ago | (#47061737)

We have to make elephants into corporations to give them such rights.

Just in time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061683)

For Global Warming!

Do they hate wooly mamonths? (1)

kheldan (1460303) | about 5 months ago | (#47061759)

We're experiencing a global warming trend, and you want to resurrect a species of large mammal that was adapted to cold climates?

They are pursuing the wrong elephant project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47061921)

These scientists need to start genetically engineering tiny elephants we can keep as pets.

Perhaps by using pot-bellied pig DNA?

Monsanto Mammoth (4, Funny)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about 5 months ago | (#47061993)

And they sue you when it tramples your house.

It's SO BIZARRE! If it looks good, eat it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47062321)

I can't wait for the guy from Bizarre Foods to share his experience eating Mammoth penis, testicles, and anus.

I don't understand the catch phrase:

If it looks good, eat it!

The man's eating animal penises, testicles, and other strange parts of an animal's body - do these 'look' good to him and others?

Can't wait (1)

formfeed (703859) | about 5 months ago | (#47062511)

For the first pot head to show up in a home-spun woolly mammoth sweater.

Wooly What?! (1)

binaryhat (2494814) | about 5 months ago | (#47062643)

Or Woolly Shit!! This should be interesting. Hybrid walking giants!

mammonths won't be a problem (2)

clovis (4684) | about 5 months ago | (#47062697)

They're already working on the solution of a runaway mammoth population:

http://news.nationalgeographic... [nationalgeographic.com]

Is it April 1st again? (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | about 5 months ago | (#47062895)

I do remember reading reprints of this quite prescient April 1st article 30 years ago.

                http://www.textfiles.com/humor... [textfiles.com]

Yabba dabba doo. (1)

harvey the nerd (582806) | about 5 months ago | (#47063277)

[Flintstones] Can't wait for that mammoth burger.
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