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Study: Earthlings Not Ready For Alien Encounters, Yet

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the take-me-to-your-leader dept.

Space 453

astroengine (1577233) writes "The people of planet Earth would be wise to raise their cosmic consciousness prior to contact with an extraterrestrial civilization, a new study shows. 'The scientific community now accepts to some degree that this contact may occur in the next 50 to 100 years,' said Gabriel De la Torre, a clinical neuropsychologist and human factors specialist at the University of Cádiz in Spain. 'Consequently, we are becoming more concerned about this possibility and its aftermath Certainly the topic of contact with extraterrestrial civilizations raises a number of questions that are not easy to answer. We estimate that this type of event will have not only a social effect, but also on both consciousness and biology as well.' Although we may not have the necessary social skill set to deal with an encounter of the third kind, scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation."

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next 50 to 100 years? (4, Insightful)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#46954945)

based on scanning we are doing of star systems out to thousands of light years? even if we find a sign of ET intelligent life, we have light-centuries to light-millennia of speed-of-light buffer time to protect ourselves after "they" discover our presence, before "contact" of any kind could be made

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

quintus_horatius (1119995) | about 5 months ago | (#46955059)

Really. Do these guys know something the rest of us don't?

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955301)

Yes, they do.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (2)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 5 months ago | (#46955353)

No, but they think they do.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955553)

These aliens and non-aliens have so much syns in the stomach of Geraldinho that God vomited

Luciana Terra Anjo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955593)

It is very very TRUE

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (4, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 5 months ago | (#46955429)

Well, I'd argue it like this: The only means of interstellar communication we know of so far is Electromagnetic waves. With the number of stars in the sky, it's pretty clear that the number of intelligent civilizations out there has to be infinite. Yet the sky is not saturated with their communications. So therefor those civilizations must be using some other technology. Now if they are communicating with entangled particles, we're kind of screwed. You can't eves drop on that. But all the science has so far lead us to believe that you can't actually communicate this way.

But now we're starting to find other fields we could use. Gravity wave detectors are getting better and better. There's the higgs field. Maybe we'll find some other new and interesting ways to relay information. But our tech is advancing at an almost exponential rate now, so I think it's entirely plausible that in the next 100 years we finally figure out how advanced life transmits information long distances. It's probably in some way encrypted so we may just hear noise, but at least we'll know it's there.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (2)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 5 months ago | (#46955627)

If their hypothetical communications are encrypted then it would look like random noise could that not then simply be interpreted as more noise in the cosmic microwave background radiation?

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955517)

These aliens drestroyied more than 1 billion galaxyies

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (4, Insightful)

TheNarrator (200498) | about 5 months ago | (#46955063)

That assumes that we know as much physics as they do. They might be using some medium to communicate that we haven't even discovered yet.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46955111)

That assumes that we know as much physics as they do. They might be using some medium to communicate that we haven't even discovered yet.

Certainly possible. But then, who of us could receive it?

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 5 months ago | (#46955191)

That assumes that we know as much physics as they do. They might be using some medium to communicate that we haven't even discovered yet.

Certainly possible. But then, who of us could receive it?

Probably all of us would receive it.

After all, they would understand our limitations, by virtue of examining our transmissions, and adjust their
transmissions accordingly.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 5 months ago | (#46955269)

Doesn't matter how many smoke signals you see from the natives, thy still won't be able to receive your radio transmissions. Unless they can send a physical receiver for their tachyon communicator they'll be stuck talking to us the only way we can hear them: via EM emissions.

Of course their first transmission could potentially be instructions on how to build a tachyon transceiver, but there would still be that initial round-trip lightspeed delay. unless of course they have physical FTL as well, or are already here.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 5 months ago | (#46955295)

If you knew the natives only spoke smoke signals you would have to be even less educated than the natives to respond with radio.

The more capable civilization adjusts communication means to fit the capabilities of less capable.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#46955639)

If you knew the natives only spoke smoke signals you would have to be even less educated than the natives to respond with radio.

The more capable civilization adjusts communication means to fit the capabilities of less capable.

How'd that work out for the native americans? Or the Mayans?

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#46955611)

That assumes that we know as much physics as they do. They might be using some medium to communicate that we haven't even discovered yet.

Certainly possible. But then, who of us could receive it?

Probably all of us would receive it.

After all, they would understand our limitations, by virtue of examining our transmissions, and adjust their transmissions accordingly.

You're assuming they would want to talk to us at all. Perhaps we are too backward to even bother saying hello to. Or perhaps they are preparing a sneak attack. Granted, we have little that could harm an advanced race, but why give us a couple of decades to prepare. If they've been watching us, they would certainly have figured out that humans are pretty good at finding creative ways of killing things when threatened.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (4, Interesting)

NotSanguine (1917456) | about 5 months ago | (#46955661)

That assumes that we know as much physics as they do. They might be using some medium to communicate that we haven't even discovered yet.

Certainly possible. But then, who of us could receive it?

Probably all of us would receive it.

After all, they would understand our limitations, by virtue of examining our transmissions, and adjust their transmissions accordingly.

You're assuming they would want to talk to us at all. Perhaps we are too backward to even bother saying hello to. Or perhaps they are preparing a sneak attack. Granted, we have little that could harm an advanced race, but why give us a couple of decades to prepare. If they've been watching us, they would certainly have figured out that humans are pretty good at finding creative ways of killing things when threatened.

Actually, they wouldn't need to be all that much more advanced than we are militarily. We sit at the bottom of a gravity well. As Heinlein suggested in The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress [wikipedia.org] , they could just "throw rocks" at us.

Not very high tech, is it?

Getting here is a completely different story, but the thought that extraterrestrial intelligence would need to be enormously more technologically advanced than we are is just not true. We (in cosmological terms) aren't so far off from creating devices that can autonomously manufacture machines to mine the moon or asteroids for rocks that can be set on intersecting trajectories with the Earth. Presumably, any intelligence that can build an autonomous probe capable of reaching us, could include that sort of technology in the probe. Berserkers [wikipedia.org] are an (albeit fictional) example.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (4, Interesting)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 5 months ago | (#46955087)

Remotely near, harmless advanced alien life capable of interstellar travel would leave us alone for a few more centuries whilst we iron out this leftover primal aggression and god fallacy..

Remotely near, exploitative advanced alien life would have already arrived and , well, exploited us and our resources.

Depending on how far down along the great filter we find ourselves, we are quite plausibly the Universe's best hope for intergalactic explorer, settler, and exploiter. Deal with that.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 5 months ago | (#46955657)

Alternatively we could just have won the race to sentients within this galaxy and others just haven't evolved there yet or are less advanced then us, who says other extra planetary lifeforms have to have evolved first.

who says WE will find THEM? (1)

subtropolis (748348) | about 5 months ago | (#46955145)

Our own planet has shown signs of life for ~a billion years or more -- the same features we ourselves are only now learning to detect in other star systems have long been apparent to all who know what to look for. Who's to say how long ago some other civilisation might have spotted us? It's not like WE are going to ignore other life-providing planets simply because there are no radio signals emanating from it. If we can conclude that another planet, however far away, harbours some kind of life that alone will place it quite high on our list of planets to keep a close eye on. I don't think it's at all unreasonable to assume that ours would hold a similar place for others out there. It's possible, IOW, that Earth was spotted long before any large mammals -- or even reptiles -- were crawling around on its surface.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955171)

we have light-centuries to light-millennia of speed-of-light buffer time to protect ourselves after "they" discover our presence, before "contact" of any kind could be made

A sufficiently advanced entity may have the ability to travel faster than light.

If they arrive I'll be sure to send them to you, so you can tell them it is not
possible for them to have arrived so soon.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955261)

Stephen Hawking once said that if aliens visit us they will most likely not be friendly. Whether or not he is right is irrelevant because the aliens aren't coming. Ever.

The idea of aliens coming to earth has been the subject of countless novels, movies and televison shows, and even though those stories are entirely fictional, they have greatly influenced the way we think about the idea of encountering beings from other worlds. Unfortunately, our thinking on this subject is very small and limited. If we step back and think a little bigger, we will realize that any aliens with the ability to come visit us almost certainly would not care to.

Sci-fi stories can ignore the bits that aren't very interesting. Movie aliens rarely get sick or worry about eating. Sci-fi stories rarely mention gravity because, given our limited view, we expect gravity to just work and shooting a movie without it would be a pain. So, screw it, all movie aliens have invented artificial gravity. After all, warp-drive engines and pew-pew energy-blasters are much more fun to think about.

In the real world, however, science tends to advance in all directions, because advances in one field almost always results in advances in many others. For example, the invention of the computer accelerated all other fields of human science.

A race of aliens capable of reaching earth has, at a minimum, perfected faster-than-light travel (or perfected a way to travel for thousands of years at sub-light), conquered the long term biological effects of space radiation, and mastered extreme long distance space navigation, just so they can come to earth and . . . . . what? Steal our water? Study us?

So why *WOULD* aliens come to earth?

Do they really want our water (or minerals or whatever)? That implies an economic model in their decision. By definition, they need and value those resources and coming here to get them is their most economical choice. Getting them somewhere closer to home or manufacturing them must be more "expensive" (in some sense of the word) than the cost of traveling all the way here, gathering our resources and flying them home.

While not impossible, that seems unlikely - both technologically and economically. Even we have (expensively) already mastered alchemy. We have the tech to create matter from energy. Imagine that tech in a few hundred years, or whenever it is you think we'll be able to travel several light years for a mining expedition. What would be cheaper and better, making stuff at home or building a fleet of galactic warships and sending them (along with thousands of soldiers and miners) to some far off planet?

Currently, getting to Proxima Centauri (the closest star outside our solar system) in less than a few hundred years would require technolgy that is several orders of magnitude beyond what we have now. If getting humans to another star system is a 100 on some "technology ability scale", then we're currently at about 2, which is not far ahead of poodles who are probably at 1.

What about the idea that aliens might come to Earth to colonize the planet (and maybe vaporize us in the process)? You could argue that terraforming (or maybe aliens would call it xenoforming) could be a technology more advanced than FTL travel. With that assumption, you could imagine an alien race that can travel across the galaxy but not alter planets to suit their biological needs. Coming to colonize Earth could make sense. But this ignores the fact that several other requisite technologies would probably make their need to colonize obsolete.

Before they had FTL travel, they likely spent many decades traveling at less that light speed and so chances are their ships are quite comfortable. In fact probably more like sailing biodomes than ships - someplace they could live indefinitely. Assuming their other scientists were hard at work while their engineers were busy perfecting FTL, stuff like air and food have long been technologied away.

The only thing something like Earth could give them is a place to stand on. Xenoforming a planet might be out of their reach, but creating ships to live in is, by definition, well within their reach. The home-iness of living on an alien planet probably is questionable. It won't be as hospitable as their own ships.

So why else might they want to come here? Maybe they want to trade with us. Yeah, right. What would we offer them? Pottery? A really good recipe for pizza? They certainly won't be interested in our childish technology.

Well, maybe they want to study us. Maybe. But, if they are already travelling around the galaxy then we probably would not be the first planet they have visited. Chances are, they've seen other life forms already. Remember, in order to make FTL ships, pew-pew lasers and artificial gravity you're going to need math, science and computers that are far more advanced than ours. We might be interesting, but not all that interesting.

So they use their super-advanced version of the Hubble telescope to see our solar system. They see that earth is just the right distance away from the sun to support life. They know its land and atmospheric composition. They see its oceans and know the planet's temperature variations.

Even today, if we saw such a solar system, we'd have a pretty good idea that life could be there. If our science and technology was 1000 times more advanced, how accurately could we predict what those life forms would be like? And does it even matter? In other words, with enough data they already know we're here. Just like we know there was once water on Mars or the composition of the atmosphere on Venus.

If we discovered a fish-like creature somewhere on one of the planets or moons in our solar system it would be fascinating for us to study it. But, if we were 1000 times smarter and had spent the last 1000 years finding fish-like creatures across the galaxy, and could detect the existence of such creatures from light-years away, it probably wouldn't be all that interesting to go study another one.

The question of why aliens might "want to come here" is fundamentally flawed because we are forming that question from our current (tiny) viewpoint. The word "want" might not even apply to someone 1000 times smarter than us.

If an alien race is capable of getting here, all the other technology they've developed in the meantime would make the trip unnecessary, and more than likely, simply meaningless. We're just not as advanced or as important as we like to think. In the end, there's no compelling reason to think they'd be interested in meeting us.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (3, Interesting)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 5 months ago | (#46955399)

suppose for a second that 'greed' is an evolutionary construct -- which i think is plausible (IE, organisms acting in their own self interest, possibly with some altruistic tendencies towards members of it's own species in higher order critters).

Is it unreasonable to assume that the evolutionary pressures that led to humans with our 'greed' and desire to dominate would also come into play on another planet with a different set of starting conditions? IE, they might not look like us, or share the same chemical building blocks, but they'd certainly act like us.

The idea that we as a species are some kind of petulant greedy child just needing to grow up a bit might not be accurate -- it might be baked into our DNA, and by extension other alien life would have the same tendencies: Overuse and over extension of resources, a desire to explore and 'conquer'.. climbing the galactic Mount Everest because it's 'there'.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (3, Interesting)

Camel Pilot (78781) | about 5 months ago | (#46955469)

I agree ET would have similar behavior... if they are technically advanced they would most certainly be social, curious and have empathy.

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#46955659)

I agree ET would have similar behavior... if they are technically advanced they would most certainly be social, curious and have empathy.

And if they evolved from something analogous to ants, how much empathy do you think they will have?

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955423)

tl;dr

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955695)

tl;dr

Translation. I'm too lazy to bother to read your post, but I'm narcissistic enough to want to get my $.02 in, so I'm going to attempt (and in this case, fail) to make a snarky comment rather than contribute to the discussion.

crush us before we leave the nest (2)

subtropolis (748348) | about 5 months ago | (#46955435)

I think they would want to come here for the same reasons that we would want to investigate some other planet which shows strong signs of harbouring life. However, having seen how we have developed, it might not be too unlikely that they would at least consider destroying us before we've reached the point where we can leave our own solar system. Note: I've never even seen Independence Day. The notion that aliens would want to come all the way here just to destroy us had always seemed pretty silly to me. But upon further reflection i don't think it's at all silly now.

Re:crush us before we leave the nest (1)

Known Nutter (988758) | about 5 months ago | (#46955635)

Crush us before we leave the nest!??

Isn't that what the Borg tried to do? You see how well that worked out for them...

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955321)

In less than 6 months aliens in come to Earth and destroy verything

Re:next 50 to 100 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955493)

These aliens travel in space in GLOBO

Study? (4, Insightful)

Irate Engineer (2814313) | about 5 months ago | (#46954949)

What was this based on? Did the PI rent Independence Day from Redbox last week and suddenly get an idea to spin a humanities degree into notoriety?

Stuff that *might* happen *might* lead to other stuff that *might* happen.

Slashdot makes me want to throw my laptop against the wall and punch people. Gahhh....

Re:Study? (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 5 months ago | (#46955175)

Psychology: never put your trust in a field where people can make stuff up and have it accepted as canon by everyone else: http://www.arachnoid.com/psych... [arachnoid.com]

So what would happen if aliens made an appearance?

That very much depends on the aliens.

Nice friendly Vulcan types with an interest in the betterment of intelligences in general would have a very different effect on global civilisation and this yahoo's "consciousness" than Battle for LA type aliens, or even random leviathan seeder drones sent out to terraform likely worlds into Cybertron-alikes to serve as industrial waystations for the sleeper colonists drifting through the cold void millions of years in their wake.

Re:Study? (1)

RazorSharp (1418697) | about 5 months ago | (#46955377)

My sentiments exactly. When did conjecture constitute a study? I've read sci-fi that made more plausible predictions than this 'study.' Someone give Ray Bradbury a posthumous Ph.D in Extraterrestrial Studies!

Re:Study? (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 5 months ago | (#46955413)

What was this based on? Did the PI rent Independence Day from Redbox last week...

Yes, and they determined based on some convoluted elitist bullshit that people are just too stupid to have a clue.

I know hearing this from "pencil necked neck-beards" is harsh, but believe me, if you haven't spent your life isolated from reality on some college campus, you are simply not qualified to speak on the issue.

Ack Ack Ack .... I want to thank my Grandma for always being so good to me, and, and for helping save the world and everything.

Three words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46954965)

Klaatu Barada Nikto.

Re:Three words (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 5 months ago | (#46955075)

Three other words: Michael Crichton: Sphere.

Bullshit. (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 5 months ago | (#46954985)

First Contact will happen by 2024.

Enough people are ready to handle the truth: The human body is a arch-type.

Re:Bullshit. (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 5 months ago | (#46955189)

Ah that explains all those people they need to hold up the roofs of cathedrals.

It will be a disaster. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46954991)

The human race is incapable of being second fiddle to any other life form, and presumably any life we contact will be much more advanced than we are. And then you have the whole religious nutter problem - my god, I can't even imagine the reaction there. You think Heaven's Gate was ridiculous? Just wait...

Re:It will be a disaster. (5, Insightful)

Lost Race (681080) | about 5 months ago | (#46955095)

The human race is incapable of being second fiddle to any other life form,

Nonsense. Look back at history and see the millions of humans who allowed themselves to be enslaved, subjugated, or otherwise oppressed. Humans are excellent at playing second fiddle.

And much of that oppression / subjugation / slavery was based on race or religion, so it doesn't particularly matter if the new overlords are some new kind of "alien", and it doesn't matter what our gods tell us about them. If they stomp their boots on our necks hard enough we will kneel before them.

It doesn't matter (1, Interesting)

sunking2 (521698) | about 5 months ago | (#46954997)

If we can't find an airliner somewhere on this planet what the odds of us or anyone else finding us in the universe.

Re:It doesn't matter (1)

fightermagethief (3645291) | about 5 months ago | (#46955021)

we can put a man on the moon, so...

Re:It doesn't matter (2)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46955167)

we can put a man on the moon, so...

*Can* we? We could at one time. I have wondered for awhile if projects like putting a living person on another planet and returning them safely to earth is something that a nation can do only at a certain stage of development, when the thirst for adventure is greater than the perceived need for safety, and bureaucracy has not yet quite managed to strangle large undertakings.

Re:It doesn't matter (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 5 months ago | (#46955211)

I have wondered for awhile if ...

+1

Toss in not much land left to conquer, and lowered birthrates + concomitant increase in fear of losing The One Child.

bureaucracy has not yet quite managed to strangle large undertakings.

Why did you add not yet? It contradicts the rest of your argument.

Re:It doesn't matter (2)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46955543)

What I meant was that I don't believe that the US government could put a man on the moon now. I suspect that, inevitably as a nation ages, bureaucracy increases to the point where no matter how rich the nation is, the cost of large undertakings balloons out of control until the project can't be done anymore. I suspect that a nation can do big projects -- the national electrical power infrastructure, building a comprehensive, integrated road system over almost 4 million square miles, and putting a man on the moon and bringing him back, can only be done during a "sweet spot" in a government's history. And we are past that point now.

Test by: In the 1960's, we built the largest, most complicated machine ever built by man (the Saturn V stack) and sent a payload to the moon and back. In the 1980's, we just barely, at tremendous cost, created a cargo plane that could make it into LEO and most of the time return safely to Earth. In the three decades since then, there's been a few attempts to recreate the heavy lifting and spacecraft capabilities we had in the 60's, but costs became too great and they were canceled. My point is, I don't think the US government could do it anymore.

Maybe private companies could, but the danger there is government over-regulation making it too costly. And then, with what are we left? Bond villains?

Re:It doesn't matter (1)

fightermagethief (3645291) | about 5 months ago | (#46955335)

I really can't be sure if we can, did, or could again. I was just trying to point out that finding plane parts in the ocean and finding alien life in the galaxy are two completely different things. Sort of like how people always say: "We put a man on the moon, so why can't we do X".

Re:It doesn't matter (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46955443)

This.

The US of the 60s was a dream factory. Anything was possible, anything you could think of someone could make. And that someone was the US, no doubt about that. If anyone can, the US can. Notice how anything the US did was by default good and sacred? Even Vietnam, a war that had by some margin less tangible effects on Europe, had mixed reactions in good ol' Europe and quite a bit of support, rather than the unanimous opposition the current wars of the United States are met with.

The US of the 60s could do anything in the mind of the people around the globe. In both senses, they were allowed to, and they were able to.

The US of today qualify for neither.

Re:It doesn't matter (2)

RazorSharp (1418697) | about 5 months ago | (#46955445)

I would think the main constraint would be economic. What nation wants to commit so many resources for so little in return. The lunar missions were more important for political reasons (the Cold War) during their time than anything else. Would that thirst for adventure have existed had we not been competing with our red adversaries? It certainly wouldn't have had the urgency if not for the competition.

The main thing the lunar missions gave us was the various technologies that were produced as a result of them. So far the moon hasn't proved to be worth mining and it certainly has no appeal for colonization.

I could spend all my money on a giant diamond encrusted neckless. But my girlfriend would probably be real pissed and kick me out when I can no longer contribute. Similarly, our government could go back to the moon. But the electorate would be pissed because like an oversized diamond encrusted neckless it doesn't do anything but costs a shit ton. I guess it always sounds good to vilify the word bureaucracy and to make fun of nancys who are overly concerned with safety, but I just don't think it's a sound argument in this case.

Re:It doesn't matter (2)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46955595)

I agree with a lot of what you said. What I'm trying to say is that yes, the moon shots cost a shit-ton in the 1960's, but even adjusted for inflation, the cost of doing it now after the inevitable budget ballooning out of control, due to the process itself becoming fundamentally broken, would be so great that no amount of money could achieve it. The more money you would pour into such a project, the more money it would cost, with the goal being forever out of reach. I'm not saying a moon shot is not practical (that's a sound argument and a good subject for debate) but that it's not even *possible* anymore. Another case in point: A certain modern fighter plane intended to be an affordable replacement for a very expensive older model, has become so much more expensive than the plane it was supposed to replace that it's now in danger of cancellation.

Re:It doesn't matter (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 5 months ago | (#46955607)

"But the electorate would be pissed because like an oversized diamond encrusted neckless it doesn't do anything but costs a shit ton"

Like the multiple wars US is engaged in?

There's the budget for NASA, Healthcare, Welfare, Education and probably room for a couple other things

Re:It doesn't matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955025)

+rep from ac... in other words, doesn't count. Still lol.. very "visual"

Re:It doesn't matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955239)

anyone else finding us in the universe.

It's super simple for them. First they need this crazy music playing in their heads, then they need a starbase exploding next to their ship and then they magically figure out how to jump to earth.

Re:It doesn't matter (0)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 5 months ago | (#46955309)

If we can't find an airliner somewhere on this planet

The airliner isn't on this planet any more. The aliens took it. They were after the schoolgirls on board. You just need to read all the current headlines, and connect the dots.

The Korean ferry sinking was a botched abduction attempt by aliens. Who was on board the vessel? Schoolgirls.

That Wacky Islamically Challenged Nigerian has sold kidnapped schoolgirls. Who were the buyers? Aliens.

IRA General Gerry Adams claimed that he did not order the abduction of Jean McConville. That's true. He ordered her schoolgirl children to be abducted, but his drunken henchmen got things a wee bit mixed up.

Even Monica Lewinsky is back in the news. Aliens commanded her to act like a schoolgirl around Bill Clinton.

Aliens have already made contact with us, and are influencing our lives today . . . with schoolgirls at the center of the whole conspiracy . . . maybe the aliens have come to use, because they like our Henai . . . ?

He is just covering all his bases (1)

fightermagethief (3645291) | about 5 months ago | (#46954999)

...Preparing to welcome our alien overlords. Perhaps they will kill him last.

Totalitarian Government issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955007)

scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation."

There will always be the huge problem of the US Government declaring martial law whilst only allowing the president or the military to make first contact; giving the impression to an alien race that we're aggressive, much like the Klingons were made out to be...

Re:Totalitarian Government issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955231)

The way I see it, given the kind of technology needed to safely travel between solar systems if the aliens are malevolent we stand no chance of mounting a real resistance and if they're friendly we have nothing to worry about. To be honest aliens landing is probably one of the few things that could stop the coming global conflict that seems to be brewing.

Re:Totalitarian Government issues (1)

gargleblast (683147) | about 5 months ago | (#46955283)

... whilst only allowing the president or the military to make first contact ...

... only then to find out that interplanetary aliens really hate synth music. [youtube.com]

We'll be ready. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955009)

Any species intelligent enough to develop space travel is likely old and wise enough to wait until they decide we're old and wise enough to be paid a visit.

Re:We'll be ready. (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 5 months ago | (#46955163)

What a heaping crap-load of nonsense.

...what scientific community? (4, Insightful)

Rinikusu (28164) | about 5 months ago | (#46955013)

And where are they getting their data?

Re: ...what scientific community? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955055)

G hmm i dunno maybe.... the internet? No hmm it would probably be a bad example anyways...

Human Beings... (1)

stox (131684) | about 5 months ago | (#46955029)

the other white meat.

Ideal for a quick layover when exploring the back waters of the Milky Way.

The probability of it being a friendly encounter has got to be pretty low. I am not sure we will ever be ready.

Re:Human Beings... (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 5 months ago | (#46955337)

The one point in our favor, would be that a species capable of bridging the vast distances between the stars would presumably have vast technology and sufficiently advanced materials engineering and biological manipulation techniques that they would pretty much just need various useful atoms and lots and lots of energy. Our planet isn't worthless, in terms of material; but it's a hell of a lot less interesting than the solar system's larger objects in terms of volume, and it has a much more annoying escape velocity than the zillion-odd asteroids and comets and various bits of junk floating around.

This hardly means that they wouldn't consume earth in due time, possibly without even remarking on the fact that some of the carbon based macromolecules on the surface seemed pretty agitated about it, nor does it exclude the possibility that they'd fuck us up in some creative way just for the lulz, or because their hobby is eating as many different sentient organisms as possible; but, unlike the 'technologically advanced human culture kicks the shit out of primitive one, takes their stuff' story of history, anything that is doing interstellar travel might be advanced to the point of near-total disinterest. Pop out of treknobabble-travel-space in the vicinity of the sun, do a bit of scanning, consume the gas giants to refuel their world-ships, then leave to go do whatever it is has them traveling all this way in the first place.

Or they might drop a small singularity into our gravity well, just to watch us freak out on a global scale, knowing that it's sitting somewhere near the planet's core, steadily consuming it from the inside and there is nothing we can do except await an increasingly nasty series of geological upheavals and our inevitable doom; but that would be purely for spite's sake.

Which 'scientific community' (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955039)

'The scientific community now accepts to some degree that this contact may occur in the next 50 to 100 years,' said Gabriel De la Torre

Really? Which peer-reviewed journal was that published in?

Cuz the scientific community I'm aware of, at least the ones who do astrophysics and astronomy, conclude there's no evidence for any life beyond Earth.

Re: Which 'scientific community' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955079)

Is that the Christian Scientific Community your talking about? Every year in the real Scientific Community theres mounting evidence were not the only life out here.

Re: Which 'scientific community' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955101)

> Every year in the real Scientific Community theres mounting evidence were not the only life out here.

OK... where?

Re: Which 'scientific community' (0)

sillybilly (668960) | about 5 months ago | (#46955207)

There might be a shitload of life out there stuck in a single cellular stage, like life was on Earth for the first 3 billion years. In some places multicellular life might have arisen, only to be erased by a mutation in a single celled lifeform, that ate up everything else around it, and became a dominant lifeform. In fact are we sure such a thing hasn't happened on Earth too, there might have been more occasions of multicellular life say 3 billion or 2 billion years ago, with a brief existence before being digested up and erased by single cellular life.
There might also be a shit load of life out there at the level of intellect of humans on Earth, but so distant, that effective communication or contact with them is impossible. Space is vast emptiness, with very little debris here and there, and the distant galaxies we see, they seem to be flying away from us very fast, and there is a vast vast vast emptiness between us and them, insurmountably far. Even if you found intelligent life say 100 light years away, it would take a conversation 200 years going with the speed of light to exchange hellos. If intelligent life more intelligent than humans exist it might have figured out superluminal travel, but then it would probably be so intelligent, it'd be like us being dogs compared to it being a human, us trying to talk to it. Also, it may be stuck at an intelligence level, or more like knowledge level, not intelligence level, of humans 200 years ago, when radio communication or even astronomical observation has not been as refined. By the way I like the word Earthling, as it doesn't say human or ape, each of which term might be offensive to some people.

Rubbish (0)

Sigvatr (1207234) | about 5 months ago | (#46955041)

Scientists always want to keep the common, working class man down.

Re:Rubbish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955081)

Thank god the church is there to protect us

Re:Rubbish (1)

deviated_prevert (1146403) | about 5 months ago | (#46955219)

Republican Political Scientists always want to keep the common, working class man down.

There fixed that for you.

Hmm... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955045)

"Earthlings Not Ready For Alien Encounters" is false.

Inter-species erotica will take it to the next level!

"scientists or astronauts ..the best candidates.." (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955069)

"..scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation.."

- wtf, why? - I would probably select (seriously) the biggest stoner I could find, the point being mainly to demonstrate non-aggression. A scientist would start prodding them, or arguing; a 'naut would bore them with speeches, then plant a flag in the wrong part of their ectoplasma.

- nope, send some stoners to the meet-and-greet (hey, doods!) - the hope of finding shared humor remains, our only chance.

Re:"scientists or astronauts ..the best candidates (1)

mevets (322601) | about 5 months ago | (#46955427)

We may not have the necessary social skills; so sending the least socially adept people we can find will do what? Lower their expectations? Elicit sympathy?

Found proof that earthlings are not ready (1)

Shompol (1690084) | about 5 months ago | (#46955073)

proof [youtube.com]

I beg to differ. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955085)

Yes, yes I am.

Either they will kill me, learn from me or assimilate me into their society. Either way, I'm down.

If they kill me, then this world was ill-prepared to defend itself and all our problems will be solved.

If they learn from me, then they're of some intelligence who want to further the quality of life.

If they assimilate me.... well... I can dig the idea of mating with their females. It'll be a nice change of pace.

My, aren't we proud of ourselves! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955187)

Uhhh, after countless millennia when we could have been contacted by sentient aliens, all of a sudden they will chose to appear, because we wish it so? I don't think so. In the slim likelihood that anything would consider contacting us, any such civilization so advanced would be aware of the disruptive affects of such an encounter. And as such,they would most likely decline the opportunity. We ourselves, even with out limitations, recognize frail ecosystems where we dare not tread. If we mean alien lifeforms such as microbial life, even that ensuing debate would dwarf all climate discussions in rancor and animosity. No winners, no decision.

Huh? (4, Insightful)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about 5 months ago | (#46955213)

'The scientific community now accepts to some degree that this contact may occur in the next 50 to 100 years,'

Based on .... what, exactly? The complete, utter, absolute, comprehensive lack of any previous contact?

blinding me with science (4, Insightful)

swell (195815) | about 5 months ago | (#46955245)

- The scientific community now accepts to some degree -
- a clinical neuropsychologist and human factors specialist -

While some may prefer citations
and some may prefer credentials that include some basic science skills,
others will be happy to forge ahead with imaginative fantasies.

Plenty of time (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about 5 months ago | (#46955263)

We have a lot of time to find plausible explanation for various stupid things we invented, such as HFT or austerity policies.

In the real world (1)

seoras (147590) | about 5 months ago | (#46955271)

"scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation"

Of course this would never happen as politicians understand far too well the huge benefits of being the man in front of the camera for historical events.
Which is why, unless we get change our politically controlled & manipulated civilisation, no extraterrestrial intelligence will never show up here.

Re:In the real world (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#46955499)

Any aliens sufficiently advanced to make the trip here probably already have a much better idea of the socio-political implications of first contact. They will send in advanced scouts to collect information about us, including studies relating to how such contact will be received by various political and economic factions. And they will control the terms of such contact.

In fact, I suspect they will look for a progressive, politically neutral group for initial contact. And after meeting with their representatives, they will put together a plan to reveal themselves gradually. I'd bet on a country like Switzerland or Sweden. And full public revelation would occur years after the first contact with the selected group so that they will understand our culture and be able to protect themselves and their hosts from groups that would exploit them.

In fact, they may already be here. If things get out of hand in Europe (Russia, Ukraine, etc.) and another World War breaks out, the Swiss may be defending their borders with advanced plasma weapons and shields.

Self Recommendation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955303)

"scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation"

Study done by scientists. Coincidence? Sure...

Top Secret/ULTRA/MJ12/ etc. (0)

CanEHdian (1098955) | about 5 months ago | (#46955345)

What do you think ye average Holy Being(s)-fearing, holding their bible/fill-in-your-religious-.txt high in the air, Earthling is going to think when it turns out the Holy Writer(s) of the aforementioned .txt not only "forgot to mention" a few things (which you can spindoctor away), but that the ETs have completely different views. I would be very surprised if any kind of contact happened, this would play out in the open. The "reasoning" given for the need for absolute secrecy around stories like Project Majestic, etc. remain valid. The closed-minded will either get more closed-minded (harmless) or will see their world shatter and all chaos will break out.

Of course not (0)

evilviper (135110) | about 5 months ago | (#46955365)

Earthlings Not Ready For Alien Encounters, Yet

Of course not... Condoms aren't nearly strong enough. Hasn't anyone seen Ridley Scott's Prometheus (2012)?

'The scientific community now accepts to some degree that this contact may occur in the next 50 to 100 years,'

This is utter, complete, and total bullshit. No sane scientists "accepts" anything of the sort. /crap

Oblig HHGTTG reference (1)

Kittenman (971447) | about 5 months ago | (#46955395)

Probably a 'teaser": Teasers are usually rich kids with nothing to do. They cruise around looking for planets that haven't made interstellar contact yet and buzz them, meaning that they find some isolated spot with very few people around, then land right by some poor unsuspecting soul whom no one's going to believe and then strut up and down in front of him wearing silly antennas on their head and making beep beep noises.


TFA is junk, of course. But hey, it's Friday down here in Middle Earth. I don't care.

This article sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955407)

seriously, straight up what the fuck is this shit

Aliens (evil spirits) are here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955441)

The 'beasts' share the same scent - how to piss off an alien/human hybrid

the hybrids carrying filthy spawn (like in the days of Noah) are easy to SNIFF out, literally, they all smell the same when you're in the proper state of mind.

some of them have eyes which appear to be bugging out of their face.

even if you can't detect the scent of the hybrids, or 'beasts', inhale deeply whenever the hybrids are close, don't express any emotion, just keep inhaling deeply and make your facial expression be that of deep contemplation.

when you do this, they know that you know what their true reality is - it's like the movie THEY LIVE where Nada sees the truth through the glasses and confronts them.

don't confront, just inhale deeply. maybe shake your head and laugh, mumble about stupid aliens but nothing deep.

If you were an alien, would you want to contact us (0)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46955461)

Be honest. Imagine you can observe that planet here (let's assume that civilizations that manage to break the light barrier can also somehow receive our news or do their own surveillance without us noticing), would you really want to make contact with such a primitive, brutal and savage people? I can even see the first contact conversation.

"HI... umm... you wanna me to take you to our leader?"
"Heck no, find me someone with a brain who is worth talking to!"

I hope they don't come too soon. (2)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | about 5 months ago | (#46955505)

A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it. Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the Earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet. Imagine what you'll know tomorrow. -- Agent Kay

Re:I hope they don't come too soon. (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 5 months ago | (#46955663)

DAMN IT. You beat me by 30 minutes.

LK

You looking at the wrong people for contact (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955519)

Children are the ones that should make first contact not adults. They still have the wonder with out the baggage of life. Our child to their child.

()-()

Good Ole Larry (2)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 5 months ago | (#46955521)

If the aliens trurn out to be like Kzinti?

None cares (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955559)

Noone cares.

Scoring (1)

shikaisi (1816846) | about 5 months ago | (#46955581)

The main reason we are not ready to meet aliens is that a large proportion of our population would shoot them, just to see how many points they got.

Too many creationists (1)

statemachine (840641) | about 5 months ago | (#46955637)

Too many people believe the Earth was created 6000 years ago, among other things.

Conquer scientific illiteracy, and we'll go to the stars.

Get Stuffed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955649)

Although we may not have the necessary social skill set to deal with an encounter of the third kind, scientists or astronauts might make the best candidates for the first alien conversation.

GET STUFFED!

They are too advanced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46955685)

Intelligent life could have evolved several billion years before us. Alien civilizations which make it past a certain point may persist indefinitely. The likelihood that a relatively nearby civilization will be within a couple centuries of us technologically is small. They are more likely to be millions of years ahead of us. The question then is what would an intelligent civilization that advanced look like? What would we be like to them? Why would they bother communicating with us? Michio Kaku uses the analogy of us being oblivious ants next to a ten lane superhighway. The ants have no understanding of a superhighway. They have understanding of other ants. We are looking for ants. We don't see any, because the ants are distributed too far apart in space and time. Meanwhile, the superhighway is being built right next to us.

By the time our civilization is a million years old - if we make that long - Dyson Spheres and Type 3 civilizations will probably be quaint notions. It's akin to ants thinking of a super colony of ants building very large anthills. But advanced civilizations are going to be way beyond that sort of thinking, most likely.

I suspect that they have already occurred. (0)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 5 months ago | (#46955693)

For thousands of years, people have been reporting contact with various and sundry non-human entities. Today people talk about aliens, in the past people talked about fairies, in the distant past people spoke of Gods, angels and demons who walked among them. I'm not prepared to go the full von Däniken and declare that is precisely what has been happening but I don't discount the possibility either.

If humanity has had encounters with extraterrestrial life forms, you don't think everyday people would know about it yet. Do you?

Remember this "A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it. Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the Earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet." - Agent Kay

LK

Prepare to be filtered (4, Insightful)

sinij (911942) | about 5 months ago | (#46955703)

We are not going to encounter any aliens until we are ourselves are past great filter. If we make it past great filtering, than social, evolutionary, and environmental factors imposing change on humanity over time-frames involved in below-speed-of-light space travel will produce plenty of "aliens". They will be our descendants but they will be nothing like us.

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