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Elderly Mice Perk Up With Transfused Blood

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the price-of-mouse-blood-skyrockets dept.

Medicine 178

Some exciting news, as reported by the Wall Street Journal, might make you glad that human blood is a renewable resource: "Giving old mice blood from young ones makes them smarter and improves such functions as exercise capacity, according to reports from two research teams that point to new ways to study and potentially treat diseases of aging. In one study, researchers at Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco found that blood transfusions from young mice reversed cognitive effects of aging, improving the old mice's memory and learning ability. The report was published Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine. Two other reports appearing in Science from researchers at Harvard University found that exposing old mice to a protein present at high levels in the blood of young mice and people improved both brain and exercise capability. An earlier report by some of the same researchers linked injections of the protein to reversal of the effects of aging on the heart. ... What isn't known from all this research, said Buck Institute's Dr. [Brian] Kennedy, is whether young blood might also increase the life span of mice and, if so, what such implications for humans might be."

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Vampirism (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46916989)

I can see the dystopia: Young people selling blood to old folks to pay the interest on student debt, mortgage debt, credit card debt... the old generation literally sucking the blood of the new generation.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Torp (199297) | about 6 months ago | (#46916995)

Norman Spinrad's "Bug Jack Barron" :)
Although it wasn't blood i think, and the young donors died.

Re:Vampirism (2)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about 6 months ago | (#46917191)

Norman Spinrad's "Bug Jack Barron"

Or the first step to the pervasive organlegging in Larry Niven's Known Space. Where's Jack Brennan when you need him?

Re:Vampirism (2)

Cryacin (657549) | about 6 months ago | (#46917581)

How about Montgomery Burns? He's been doing it for years!

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918291)

just ask ARM...

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917009)

Once we isolate what it is in the blood, we can make an artificial version of it.
Not sure why we don't spend more money on Anti-Aging research. Everyone is going to get old, you'd think it would be more of priority.

Re:Vampirism (2)

ketomax (2859503) | about 6 months ago | (#46917115)

Tru Blood is no match for true blood, if you ask me.

Re: Vampirism (0)

loufoque (1400831) | about 6 months ago | (#46917353)

Because people see death as natural.

Re: Vampirism (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917481)

(Another AC here)

Anti-aging doesn't necessarily mean living longer, it can mean living in better health.

Re: Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917615)

I don't like the idea of "natural". Its limiting. Humans don't belong in space, but science allows it. Also our current lifespans would be much shorter without science. I would have already died of cancer if I lived completely natural. I hope science can allow me to live another 100 years in good health. It won't happen tho, or it won't happen quickly with shortsighted people controlling the purse strings.

This sucks because eventually in the future there will be a generation born that won't die. I wish I could have been into that future.

Re: Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917791)

So is polio. And rubella.

Re:Vampirism (1, Insightful)

SuperDre (982372) | about 6 months ago | (#46917777)

Well, what do you think would happen if we all lived much longer? Overpopulation.... And all those people need a job, but there aren't any.. We first need to rethink our society before we actually go and create 'immortality'...

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917797)

We are already living much longer. I guess you better get rid of your indoor plumbing and germ theory then if you're so concerned. Oh I see, the gains we've already made are OK, they're "natural" now.

People don't "need" jobs, people need to show other people that they are worthy. It's a system. Systems can change.

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918205)

Those increases in longevity came slowly over generations. And even those increases are not really game changers, people lived into their 40s in the 1700s, today people often make it into their 70s. If a full immortality serum was discovered the effect on society would be devastating. Sure we would eventually adjust, but those adjustments could result in a society that we wouldn't be particularly proud of.

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918663)

The changes till now have resulted in a society I'm sure those 100... 300... 1000 years ago wouldn't have approved of and definitely wouldn't be proud of.

Good or Bad, things change.

Re:Vampirism (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 6 months ago | (#46917959)

Well, what do you think would happen if we all lived much longer?

Fewer children, since people won't be in such a hurry to have them before it's too late.

Which means population decline along with an aging population.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 6 months ago | (#46918239)

Except the exact opposite is happening, in most developed countries the population is stable or even in decline.

Re:Vampirism (1)

EvolutionInAction (2623513) | about 6 months ago | (#46918469)

Either that's going to happen anyway and we should just get it over with, or it's never going to happen.

Either way it's a horrible argument. We're inventive! We're good at surviving. We'll come up with something.

Re:Vampirism (2)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 6 months ago | (#46918599)

You're looking at it from the wrong perspective. Your username is EvolutionInAction, well death is evolution in action. It's uncomfortable to think about, but the long refinement process of evolution requires the old generation to die off after passing on the most beneficial genes to the new generation. Without death, species would not advance.

Rather, we should not be afraid of death as some ultimate end, but instead realize our real opportunity for life beyond death, i.e. living through the genes and memes we have passed on in our lifetime. Through these, our "spirit" can be said to live on, in a very literal way.

Re:Vampirism (1)

MindStalker (22827) | about 6 months ago | (#46918525)

We can't necessarily make an artificial version cheaper than we could simply pay people to donate. We can't clone blood cells in a vat yet, and probably not any time soon.

Re:Vampirism (1)

fractoid (1076465) | about 6 months ago | (#46917113)

Interestingly, in Heinlein's books there are lifespan-prolonging treatments based on regular blood transfusions. They only became popular once blood was able to be made artificially, though.

Re:Vampirism (1)

cbhacking (979169) | about 6 months ago | (#46917173)

That was the first thing I thought of as well. When the greater part of humanity becomes aware that extreme lifetimes are possible (Howard families), that spurs longevity research which ends up producing the idea of "young blood" transfusions to keep people perpetually healthy. At the time, I thought it was probably completely unscientific (that is, something he'd come up with absent any evidence it would work). Now I wonder... was there evidence suggesting this result, fifty-odd years ago?

Re:Vampirism (2)

akpoff (683177) | about 6 months ago | (#46918033)

My first thought as well: Methuselah's Children [wikipedia.org] . IIRC this is where we first meet Lazarus Long.

In the story Lazarus Long and others are long-lived due to breeding program that financially rewards people whose parents and grandparents are long-lived who marry. For many years they stay under the radar of popular society and government but when they're found out no one will believe it's genetic. Rather they believe the long-lived must have some secret.

The long-lived escape Earth on a stolen spaceship. While they're gone scientists discover that blood transfusions extend life. And as ffactoid noted, it only became popular and viable once artificial blood becomes generally available.

Re:Vampirism (1)

pablo_max (626328) | about 6 months ago | (#46917133)

I think you mean figuratively sucking the blood of the new generation. Since, you know, the heart pumps the blood out, so there is no sucking required. ;)

Re:Vampirism (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917141)

This is how they keep Keith Richards alive, isn't it?

Re:Vampirism (2)

WormholeFiend (674934) | about 6 months ago | (#46918559)

Yea but it does not explain Ozzy

Ozzy (1)

Elder Entropist (788485) | about 6 months ago | (#46918681)

Ozzy uses young bats.

Re:Ozzy (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 6 months ago | (#46918863)

I heard about blood doping sometime in the late 80s or early 90s. They take their own blood weeks in advance, refrigerate it and give it back to themselves prior to a sporting events to increase their endurance. There were rumors that rock stars were doing it for tours also.

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918719)

Or maybe he and Ozzy drink infuse rat blood. It does say they carry the same proteins.

Re:Vampirism (3, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 6 months ago | (#46917211)

The young poor will be forced to give blood to the old rich. The old poor will be expected to die before they start actually using their social security.

Re:Vampirism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917299)

My first reaction was revulsion and defiance until I looked down and saw a needle in my arm.

They're going to start closing the borders to keep young expats in. They started tightening the noose in 2005 with the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act to keep people on the hook for their underwater mortgages. People with money and educations are now seen as a flight risk from the IRS Panopticon. Now we have license plate scanners tracking our movements, and increasingly restrictive capital export controls while foreign banks refuse to deal with American passport holders.

The lines to renounce US Citizenship are starting to get long at the US Embassy's abroad!

Similar problem Jewish refugees faced in the 1930s. They could see the writing on the wall but there was no where to flee to.

Not my wars, not my entitlements, not my debts. I don't believe in carrying the cross for the sins of my ancestors. I'll slip the noose or else they'll starve trying to get me to produce. If you never have anything nice, no one can ever take it away from you.

Re:Vampirism (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 6 months ago | (#46918289)

Just out of interest, where were you planning to go? Every country has its problems, and being honest the tradeoff between benefits and disadvantages in the US is one of the better ones, globally. It sure as hell could be a lot better and I don't like the direction it's going in, but lets be realistic here.

Re:Vampirism (2)

ketomax (2859503) | about 6 months ago | (#46917329)

Here I diffed it for you.

*** current.scenario 2014-05-05 14:16:07.554773500 +0530
--- dystopian.scenario 2024-02-30 14:16:31.182773500 +0530
***************
*** 1 ****
! Young people selling blood to old folks to pay the interest on student debt, mortgage debt, credit card debt... the old generation sucking the blood of the new generation.
--- 1 ----
! Young people selling blood to old folks to pay the interest on student debt, mortgage debt, credit card debt, internet (neutrality) debt... the old generation literally sucking the blood of the new generation.

Although, won't we be in the ruling class by then?

Re:Vampirism (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 6 months ago | (#46917697)

You'll be old by then. So yes.

Re:Vampirism (2)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 6 months ago | (#46917533)

It's already happening in China. I know students who old a kidney to pay for their education. The UK isn't far behind, with sites catering to sugar babies [seekingarrangement.com] looking for a daddy to fund their studies in exchange for sex.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Flavianoep (1404029) | about 6 months ago | (#46917911)

Gross! Now it will take me this whole week to recover my faith on humanity.

Re:Vampirism (2)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918367)

It's called the oldest profession for a reason. Pussy is a valuable commodity. Women used to get a lifetime of support, these days they can only get rent.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917579)

I can see the dystopia: Young people selling blood to old folks to pay the interest on student debt, mortgage debt, credit card debt... the old generation literally sucking the blood of the new generation.

And what percentage of the population do you think will engage in such a dark activity?

If I had to guess, I'd say about.... 1%

Re:Vampirism (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918373)

Likely the same people who do the plasma donation thing now.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917821)

If you read the summary you'd see they need young mouse blood not people blood.

Re:Vampirism (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918855)

If it's higher levels of a certain protein, they'll just find a way to make that. Modify and enslave some bacteria or something.

Link (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917005)

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303417104579541950544978572

Re:Link (1)

Noishkel (3464121) | about 6 months ago | (#46917015)

thanks. For some reason the link didn't want to show up for me. Must be one of my extensions.

Re:Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917075)

nope, the original post has the wrong link makeup
if you look at the source it's just makes them smarter...

Re:Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917085)

I guess I feel dumb. I searched the text on Google in order to get it.

Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

Noishkel (3464121) | about 6 months ago | (#46917011)

I LIKE this idea. Catch the slow and the stupid so that I might drain them of their own precious bodily fluids so that I might prolong my own life.

On a somewhat less silly note I do wonder just how much of an improvement can be had via this. And more importantly how might it be applied to new treatment techniques. Using some of the regenerative techniques maybe we could culture, say, the bone marrow of a baby and use it to constantly produce fresh blood. Maybe every few years go in for a completely 'oil change'.

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 6 months ago | (#46917019)

Sigma protocol.

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

Noishkel (3464121) | about 6 months ago | (#46917037)

Never heard of that novel. But it DOES look interesting.

And really I was thinking a bit more of some of Heinlein's later works. One way they slowed aging involved replacement blood.

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917217)

The book is Methuselah's Children it’s the first novel with Lazarus Long as the protagonist. The blood treatment is mentioned near the end of the novel.

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

hutsell (1228828) | about 6 months ago | (#46917073)

It seems surprisingly close in detail to The Hunger, 1983 [imdb.com] , Starring: Catherine Deneuve, David Bowie, and Susan Sarandon.

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

alexhs (877055) | about 6 months ago | (#46917157)

Also Traitement de choc [imdb.com] (USA: Shock Treatment, UK: Doctor in the Nude).

Re:Scientific Vampirism! (2)

Camael (1048726) | about 6 months ago | (#46917213)

I LIKE this idea. Catch the slow and the stupid so that I might drain them of their own precious bodily fluids so that I might prolong my own life.

You do realise that the rich and powerful can easily pay the fast and the strong to catch you so that they can drain your precious bodily fluids so that they can prolong their own lives. Still like the idea?

Re:Scientific Vamperisim! (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46918199)

Apparently you can give blood every 56 days [blood.ca] . How often are transfusions needed, and would be able to store enough of your young blood to have a noticeable impact in old age. I wonder if this would work with storing your own blood when you're young, freezing it, and then transfusing it when you are older. If not, perhaps an organization could be developed such that people could donate into the system, for immediate use, and they'd be able to take out an equivalent amount of blood later when they needed it. Kind of like a pension plan or social security for blood. Any excess blood that wasn't needed because people paying in died in an accident and didn't need it could be used for the emergency blood transfusions. Could be a decent way of getting the current blood supply up.

Not quite the "Quadrupling of life span".... (2)

wisebabo (638845) | about 6 months ago | (#46917021)

... that they got from another study: http://www.grg.org/SMelov.htm [grg.org]

but at least these mice weren't genetically engineered to only live a week to begin with so this result may have a (lot) more relevance.

Fortunately despite the worries of the (first!) poster, hopefully we won't descend into a civilization where the old literally becomes a vampiritic parasite on the young. They've already identified, isolated and synthetically produced (the?) protein which causes this effect so we'll be able to get the benefits without bloodletting. Still makes (made?) a great premise for science fiction/vampire movies.

As an aside, I'm impressed by how Harvard, a decade or two ago, seemed to make the decision not to go into (what I thought) was the trendy/hot science of genetic engineering but instead has invested hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars into becoming the(?) center for stem cell research. Meanwhile, genetic engineering seemed to have been sidetracked by "junk DNA" and epigenetics and in general the overwhelming complexity of the human genome (although the invention of CRISPR is a major major advance). Was it obvious to biologists that this was the right decision? Go Crimson!

bathing in the blood of young peasants (3, Funny)

jsepeta (412566) | about 6 months ago | (#46917027)

maybe vlad the impaler's wife was on to something!

Re:bathing in the blood of young peasants (2)

FauxReal (653820) | about 6 months ago | (#46917183)

I thought the legend was about Elizabeth Báthory?

Re:bathing in the blood of young peasants (2)

Torp (199297) | about 6 months ago | (#46917515)

You've got to give him points for attributing it to the wife and not to Vlad the Impaler himself :)
But i don't mind the Bathory chick being mixed with Vlad - leads to more tourism.

Overlords! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917031)

I, for one, welcome our new vampire overlords!

Re:Overlords! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917601)

I, for one, welcome our new vampire overlords!

The fact that you don't think they've been doing this for years to you suggests that the victims are very unaware they are a host to feed on.

You know, kind of like that same stinky cloud of ignorance around social media. The average consumer has no fucking clue they are the product.

Plasm + brain action (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 6 months ago | (#46917033)

The injected 'young' plasma, which improved the ability of the hippocampus, which improved learning and memory. Obviously they are trying to isolate what exactly is different about the blood that is different.

The focus is on the protein GDF11, which seems to cause improvements. The article suggests it will be three years before human testing of GDF11.

Isolate the Protiens (1)

steeleyeball (1890884) | about 6 months ago | (#46917047)

Isolate the protiens the young mice have that the old mice don't have. Blood transfusions aren't necessary... Just saline and protien.

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

Kaenneth (82978) | about 6 months ago | (#46917205)

Salty protein injection joke here...

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917617)

Salty protein injection joke here...

OK.

Don't think this will work. Otherwise, Mary Kay would have been promoting swallowing years ago to maintain a good complexion, and the divorce rate would be at 2%.

If this were true, Sephora would own every sperm bank in the country, and young men could pay their way through college jerking off. Ah, the American Dream...

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918411)

This is not a hoax, though it's reported as one.

http://campalicious.tribe.net/... [tribe.net]

Ladies, swallow. It's for your own good.

Forgot where I was for a second. Show the study to your moms and give them my #.

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | about 6 months ago | (#46918527)

I tend to trust Snopes on this one:
http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/... [snopes.com]

Sadly.

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918823)

What you believe isn't really key to the discussion? What does your woman believe.

Actually, not really a new thing here... (3, Informative)

tlambert (566799) | about 6 months ago | (#46917407)

Isolate the protiens the young mice have that the old mice don't have. Blood transfusions aren't necessary... Just saline and protien.

The previous studies that had the same result eventually concluded that it was the pluripotent stem cells in the blood which had come out of the marrow as part of normal blood production.

On this basis, a treatment was developed (and insurance approved) using autologous stem cell transplantation; it's a common treatment for some types of cardiac events. There are also transplants involving harvesting of marrow stem cells, and then separating leukotic stem cells from those which are non-leukotic, and then growing and storing them while the patient undergoes radiation or chemotherapy to kill of their remaining marrow (this requires frequent transfusions to keep the blood volume of functional cells up, as the body is no longer replacing them itself at a high enough rate). Subsequent to this, the saved and separated cells are then transplanted back into the long bones (the rest of the interior areas of the smaller bones are allowed to be recolonoized by stem cells that escape the long bones). Since the treaments are autologous, you about conditions like interstitial pneomonitis, or the need for anti-rejection therapy, which is sometimes problematic when using a heterologous cell source.

See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A... [wikipedia.org]

Re:Actually, not really a new thing here... (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 6 months ago | (#46917989)

Stem cells appear to be a non-renewable resource, and there are signs in the very elderly that as the remaining count approaches zero, so does the life expectancy.
Would that not imply that transplants and transfusions prolongs the life expectancy and quality of the recipients while at the same time reducing it for the donors?

In other countries, the blood and marrow of aborted foetuses might be used as a source, but here in the magic-thinking US, that won't fly for several more generations.
So who is going to provide the young blood stem cells? The prison population, perhaps?

Re:Actually, not really a new thing here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918315)

Stem cells are non-renewable in the sense that an individual human, alone is renewable. We often forget that we are an entire species. Our existence isn't sustained by one person alone, but by an entire population. We have offspring who then get a fresh complement of new stem cells. We have a built-in mechanism for solving this problem. A more pressing problem than extending the lifespan of the 0.2% is getting some of the 99.8% off this rock so our species will have better odds for long-term survival.

Re:Actually, not really a new thing here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918331)

*alone is not renewable

Re:Isolate the Protiens (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918049)

It's spelled "protein" for fuck's sake. Do you not see that red squiggly line?

The blood of a virgin .... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917061)

Wait ... I can just use my own :(

Maybe they were just scared? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917087)

Maybe they were just given young blood by male researchers and got scared into running faster.

Disclaimer: for some reason, I can't check the linked article, so I have no idea who the authors and lab techs are on the original papers.

When do we do human trials? (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 6 months ago | (#46917089)

We need to progress this technology quick. We need to progress human trials. It is important we know if this method could improve human function as well such as doing endurance sports like cycling.

Oblig. Simpsons reference (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917171)

Isn't this why Mr. Burns has lived to be over 100 years old?

Simpsons Did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917187)

(Reference to a South Park episode where the characters reference The Simpsons as already doing that storyline)

Dayam! (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 6 months ago | (#46917253)

I just saw a Spiderman movie with a similar plot

Thieving American Scientists!!!!! (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about 6 months ago | (#46917283)

Stealing advanced Romanian scientific discovery!!!!!

Saw this with my mom. (5, Interesting)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 6 months ago | (#46917405)

She would recover for about six weeks.

But on the third time- she died of blood poisoning- which is a risk from getting a blood transfusion.

But it was kinda like I got to see her again after she had been gone for a long time, replaced by a sort of dotty, eccentric person. She was suddenly sharp, intelligent and the fuzziness went away.

Re:Saw this with my mom. (4, Interesting)

kyrsjo (2420192) | about 6 months ago | (#46917745)

Sorry for your loss :(

May I ask why was she getting blood transfusions in the first place, and how old she was? And recover from what?

Good for the economy? (3, Insightful)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 6 months ago | (#46917491)

As it stands, hundreds of thousands of people in the United States donate blood and plasma everyday, not out of goodness of heart, but for the quick $50 you get. If it turns out that this procedure not only works on humans, but that the effects are substantial, and the FDA actually approved the practice, the value and price of blood would go up and the number of donors would skyrocket. This could cause problems like increasing the cost of a blood transfusion for someone who is bleeding out from a bad accident. It may introduce social problems like a suddenly expanding elderly population, but perhaps they would be better able to take care of themselves and would require less age-disease related medication. Then their is the problem of who pays for it. People who retired with a lot of money may be able to pay what could be a hefty price, but what of people in lower classes? If this extends life, would it not be a right to life issue where anyone past a certain age is guaranteed the procedure? Would Medicare pick up the bill? What about retirement and the employment market? Ideally we will discover that a whole blood transfusion is not necessary but that instead there is just one component of young blood that would need distilled, cloned, grown in a lab and infused in smaller amounts then a full transfusion.

At the end of the day, life extension is one of the major goals of modern medicine, and aging itself is increasingly be viewed as a disease. Whether or not this pans out, eventually something will, and we will then enter into stranger times then we already live. Cheers to the future for better or worse.

Re:Good for the economy? (0)

umghhh (965931) | about 6 months ago | (#46917815)

if old folks cannot pay there are always ways to transfer them to a body dump in vicinity.

Re:Good for the economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918237)

At the end of the day, life extension is one of the major goals of modern medicine...

No it's not. At least in the US, the goal is to take all the $s possible from patients.

Re:Good for the economy? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46918251)

$50!?! Seriously I'm surprised that not everyone does it for that price. I'm pretty sure you don't get paid in Canada. It's always referred to as "donating" blood. Apparently you can give blood every 56 days [blood.ca] . I think that many people would welcome an extra $300 a year.

Re:Good for the economy? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918437)

You don't generally get paid for whole blood. But they do for plasma, which can also be donated more regularly.

Re:Good for the economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918449)

This isn't entirely true. Although there ARE paid plasma and whole blood donations across the country, these ARE NOT the donations used for transfusions. They are used for research, and pharmaceutical production primarily. ONLY volunteer (unpaid) donor blood and blood products may be used for direct transfusion. Also, $50 is on the VERY high end of the spectrum and typically only for a plasma donation.

Great (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917543)

So now rather than just raping young boys, Republicans are also going to take their blood. How many thousands are going to die from botched transfusions?

Politically Incorrect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918191)

Most of Slashdot is Republican and very, very easily offended. You will be modded down.

Mr Burns... (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about 6 months ago | (#46917781)

Exxcccceellleennntt

Third world adoption market! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917835)

Get the orphans here, adopt them, get them hooked on "Twilight" and then drain them. Everybody's happy.

Blood from old to young is bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917873)

This is old news. They also tried it in reverse and found the young where hurt by getting old people's blood.

There's also a cancer risk (2)

MyNicknameSucks (1952390) | about 6 months ago | (#46917875)

Most of the coverage of this story is reporting the "Happy happy joy joy!" aspects (cure heart disease! reverse aging! improving mental agility!), but a few outlets are reporting that there's also a risk for cancer.

Re:There's also a cancer risk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918831)

Cancer would be a setback, but if we can cure it by sucking the supple bone marrow of the young, the project will be back on track! Huahahhahaaahahaa!

It's a protein, not the whole blood (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46917931)

They'll just figure out how to mass produce the protein, patent it, give it an inscrutable name like Hemobulex Flummuxterone, a trade name like HemoNu and sell it for eleventy billion dollars a bottle.

Use By Date - Stem Cells and Hayflick's Limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918287)

Stem Cells travel in the blood and must obey Hayflick's Limit.. i.e. we all don't make Telomerase.. so our parts have a "Limited Warranty". When they "Spoil" they either produce Cancer, or Expire.. As Yoda would say "There is no Try.." If you could tamp the immune system down far enough, you could quite literally live a very long and relatively healthy life by Transfusions -- but not for energy, the fat energy cycle would have to continue. So "technically" the X-Files got that "Righter" with Fat Vampires.. but Rejuvenation would be realm of the Blood Vampires. Stem Cell cloning of Islet cells to fight Diabetes Type 2 is also right.. and a little gene therapy might help with P53... of coure some already have a Genotype favorable to CC which means they won the lottery already and frequently live to 125 or slightly more.. but even they would need the Stem Cell transfusions to out run Hayflick's Limit.

This was known about in 1969 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918311)

This effect [imdb.com] was known about as far back as 1969.

The First Nano-machines - Harvested Stem cells (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918391)

Its kind of funny that we are looking at making Nano-machines, robots to infiltrate the blood when we already have the templates or blueprints for the first generation in our blood, even more so since the white blood cell Stem cells have the ability to squeeze into and around organ tissue to infiltrate and fight infections from within. As Stem cells they are the Universal replacement part, and in theory could cause instant tissue regeneration.. and ironically are members of the Immune system. So in programming "terms" Stem cells are a "Class" object with the definition for the perfect nano-machine, and already proven to be tasked and loaded with the exact methods needed to sponsor human life. As "Instances" of the perfect and proven nano-machines we want, their only failing is that they have a limited lifespan dictated by their Telomeres and AutoAtopsis. Our own younger versions could be harvested and frozen for use years and then revived and reintroduced into their donor to Rejuvenate them, or we could take older White Blood cell Stem Cells and introduce Telemerase to re-wind their clocks, and sort the Cancerous from the Non-Cancerous versions and reintroduce those.. but guess which would be cheaper? And the of course the "true Blood Vampires" could just live off other donors White Blood Stem cells.. but with attendant cancer risks and immune problems.. gradually degnerating from all the collateral damage.. ironically like the "Vampires of Lore"

Next Google investment (1)

NapalmV (1934294) | about 6 months ago | (#46918647)

Next Google investment you'll hear about is mice.

https://plus.google.com/+Larry... [google.com]
.

Bartender (1)

NotFamous (827147) | about 6 months ago | (#46918867)

I'll have another Bloody Mary.

A mouse named Lance Armstrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918873)

It may sound like a good idea but will get you banned from the Tour de Fance.

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