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Ancient Egyptian Brewer's Tomb Found

samzenpus posted about 10 months ago | from the pyramid-lite dept.

Beer 66

Rambo Tribble writes "Reminding us of beer's pivotal role in the civilization of humankind, the BBC comments on the discovery of an Ancient Egyptian tomb, belonging to the distinguished 'head of beer production' in the Pharaoh's court. From the article: 'Experts say the tomb's wall paintings are well preserved and depict daily life as well as religious rituals. Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told the Egyptian al-Ahram newspaper that security had been tightened around the tomb until excavation works are complete.'"

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Tetracycline ale. (3, Interesting)

EmperorOfCanada (1332175) | about 10 months ago | (#45871389)

Some Egyptian beer used a yeast that produced huge quantities of tetracycline; enough that it changed the colour of their bones. I wonder if any of the text will refer to the beer's medicinal properties.

Re:Tetracycline ale. (4, Informative)

Mal-2 (675116) | about 10 months ago | (#45871583)

A bit of clarification -- it's not the yeast, it's contamination of the grain itself by streptomyces. It would have also led to (much lower) levels in unfermented products like bread or gruel, but fermentation let the production increase tremendously.

Linky. [discovery.com]

Re:Tetracycline ale. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45876707)

Archaeologists from Tokyo’s Waseda University have unearthed the richly decorated tomb of an ancient brewer on the west bank of the Nile opposite Luxor. The team has been excavating the necropolis of El-Khokha since late 2007. Also called the Valley of the Nobles, it’s an area known for its tombs of royal officials and aristocrats mainly from the 18th, 19th and 20th Dynasties. The clearing of the modern hamlets of Sheikh Adb el-Qurna and el Khokha (a long and ugly controversy, see here for an overview) has left debris in the area that needs clearing and opened more of the site to archaeological exploration.

The Waseda University archaeologists were cleaning the courtyard of tomb TT47, final resting place of Userhat, overseer of the royal harem and an important official at the court of 18th Dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III (father of Akhenaten the apostate and grandfather of boy king Tutankhamun) when they discovered the entrance to a T-shaped tomb. Inside they found beautifully painted ceilings and walls that identified its owner as Khonso-Im-Heb, head of beer production for mother goddess Mut and the head of the royal storehouses during the Ramesside era (a period between 1292–1069 B.C. when eleven 19th and 20th Dynasty pharaohs took the name Rameses).

The murals are in excellent condition, brightly colored and mostly intact. They depict scenes of daily life in Khonso-Im-Heb’s family and religious rituals, some of which he participates in alongside his wife and children. One wall features the famous Opening of the Mouth ritual wherein priests of Anubis and the decedant’s heir magically opened the mouth of a statue or mummy so that it could breathe and speak in the afterlife. The ceiling is painted with colorful geometrical designs around a solar boat.

The tomb has two intersecting halls in a T-shape and a burial chamber. One side of it adjoins and is connected to another tomb belonging to someone named Houn. We don’t know anything more about him at this time. Once the tombs have been fully excavated and documented, the brewer’s tomb will be conserved with an eye to opening it up to tourists.

People like bright colors, and drawing tourists is a big problem for Egypt and Luxor in particular right now. The bottom has completely fallen out of the tourist trade because of the political upheaval of the past two years. Meanwhile, budget shortfalls have ministerial instability have left archaeological sites and museums unguarded and prey to looters. That’s why Mohammed Ibrahim made a point of announcing that security at the site would be increased while excavations are ongoing.

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/

Any yeast found ? (4, Interesting)

perpenso (1613749) | about 10 months ago | (#45871421)

Any yeast found? It would be interesting if his brew could be resurrected.

Re:Any yeast found ? (2)

gcore (748374) | about 10 months ago | (#45871441)

If there is a way, Dogfish Head will surely brew it. But they will probably brew it anyway ;)

Re:Any yeast found ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871935)

Heh, you got that right.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 10 months ago | (#45871569)

The tetracycline is produced by Streptomyces bacteria that contaminates the beer, rather than the yeast. It can be done, but brewing your own antibiotics just doesn't seem like a good idea to me.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

impossiblefork (978205) | about 10 months ago | (#45871919)

It almost definitely isn't. I remember transforming plasmids with parts for tetracycline resistance into bacteria in highschool and I can't imagine that this would be allowed if tetracycline were something that one would want to use as an antibiotic for humans.

Re:Any yeast found ? (3, Informative)

MrBingoBoingo (3481277) | about 10 months ago | (#45872257)

Tetracycline family antibiotics are actually very popular for use in humans. Like any antibiotic though resistance is a concern as is making sure the antibiotic in question is effective on the pathogen casuing problems. Tetracyclines tend to be bacteriostatic antibiotics rather than bacteriocidal (so they require use with a functioning immune system to have maximum benefit) which along with their side effect profile makes their use a bit more targeted in practice generally than some other antibiotics.

Re:Any yeast found ? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871643)

Probably not. The most likely sources of yeast would have been either spontaneous yeasting, letting natural occurring yeast "contaminate" the wort or by using residue from earlier brews. The yeast as such was not contained because it was unknown that this biological substance was required.
It probably is far more likely that this will shed some light on the common ingredients, which seeds were used for the malt, which additives were included (herbs, fruits, nuts) and what (if any) gruit was common. The yeast strains are most likely a reflection of what occurred naturally in that ecosystem. To find out what that could have been like, a paleo ecological study could shed some light on that.

Signed:
An archaeologist and beer fanatic (which seems to be a pleonasm)

Re:Any yeast found ? (3, Interesting)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | about 10 months ago | (#45872945)

Have you seen the TV show "Brew Masters?". They did an episode where an expedition was mounted to Egypt, to examine some hieroglyphs at a tomb and capture wild yeast. It was then used to brew "Ta Henket", a limited release one-time brew by Dogfish Head brewery in DE.

The hieroglyphs showed what appeared to be loaves of bread involved in the brewing of beer. One theory is that the ancient brewers put loaves of bread into the wort, inadvertently pitching yeast in the process. The modern brewers attempted to recreate this by baking simple loaves of bread using emmer, a local grain of the time period, then adding the crumbled loaves to the fermenter.

Re:Any yeast found ? (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#45874847)

One theory is that the ancient brewers put loaves of bread into the wort, inadvertently pitching yeast in the process.

I would venture to say it wasn't "inadvertent".

They may have not understood the microscopic level, but by this time humans would have been brewing beer for likely thousands of years already. They knew what would happen and what they expected.

We tend to forget there was likely many many thousands of years of pre-history during which brewing, baking, building, tool making would have been very well developed.

By this time, they had fairly sophisticated stone-buildings, agriculture, societies and concepts of astronomy -- beer and bread making is comparatively ancient to those things, and likely go back to when humans first started making settlements and farming.

Re:Any yeast found ? (3, Insightful)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | about 10 months ago | (#45874979)

I agree. They knew that the bread was a necessary part of the process, so it was added.

They had no idea that the only part of the bread that was needed was a microscopic one-celled organism that also caused the bread to rise in the first place.

Would likely be explained as the "spirit of the bread" causing the brew to become beer, or similar pre-scientific explanation.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#45878147)

And long before then they figured out that the bread also needed to get exposed to stuff to get the yeast, even if they had no idea of the specifics of it.

But they'd have been doing it for thousands of years by that point.

Bread and beer pretty much formed a lot of the foundations of civilization.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 10 months ago | (#45880137)

Probably not baked bread (heat kills yeast) but either bread dough, or later, a small reserve from the brew itself -- much how sourdough uses a bit of the previous batch.

Re:Any yeast found ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45877145)

"Have you seen the TV show "Brew Masters?"."
Thanks for the tip, I'll look it up right away! Because there is nothing like a good chat about beer in the morning!

About the bread. I don't think this could have been intended as the primary ingredient to allow fermentation. The reason for this is twofold, although bread-dough may undergo some yeasting before baking, the baking process itself would surely kill off most of the yeast. The second reason is that wild/spontaneous fermentation had to be the forgoer of any alternative method used by definition. What sets beer and whine apart from stronger, simpler fermented drinks from fruits and other high sugar content sources is it's recipe complexity which results in a lower ABV. It is unlikely that this new recipe came with a revolutionary new way of triggering the fermentation process.

It seems to me far more likely that bread was added for taste, similar to peat-malt or roasted-malt. Bread being make from wheat in some ways, it's reasonable to assume that at one point they were put together to make the wort. Perhaps if not bread, but bread dough was added, it could supply suitable amounts of yeast, but bread yeast being wild fermentation as well, the bread would simply be an intermittent stage where earlier wild yeasts would be directly introduced to the wort.

It does make sense. Quickly starting the fermentation process rather than leaving the wort exposed for hours to the open air. If the ancient brewers realized that it was contact with air that was a necessary ingredient, they may have used a proxy to collect "air" in order to minimize the risk of the wort going bad. Baking it, however does not seem right to me and it had to be a later development in brewtechnologie.

Signed,
The alcoho... Archaho.. Achaeologist

Re:Any yeast found ? (2)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | about 10 months ago | (#45877483)

When I watched the show, I was thinking the same thing regarding the baking temperatures killing off the yeast. Surely the presence of wild yeast in the air was critical to the process, even if the ancient brewers didn't know it. If the baking and brewing took place at the same location, there would be enough flour and grain dust in the air to help spread wild yeasts quite well, even without the addition of the finished bread.

"Brew Masters" aired on Discovery Channel a few years ago, and a total of 6 episodes were made, of which 5 actually aired. All 6 episodes are available on BitTorrent sites. Supposedly the show was killed when "Big Beer" threatened to pull their ads from the network, but who knows...

All episodes centered around Dogfish Head and their various projects. A good show, but tended to turn into an over-the-top promotional spot for DFH at points, rather than an exploration of the art of craft brewing in general. Well worth watching, though, especially with a beer or 2. :)

For the Egyptian ale project, the brewery worked with Dr. Pat McGovern, a molecular archaeologist from U. Penn. He analyzed residues from old pottery vessels to come up with some of the ingredients used. He also worked with them on a few other "Ancient Ale" projects that saw wider release, including "Midas Touch" and an interesting neolithic era Chinese inspired brew called "Chateau Jiahu", brewed with honey and hawthorne fruit.

Re:Any yeast found ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45877551)

Thanks, I'll watch it with my ad-blocking goggles on then!
The residue analysis story I saw a couple of day/weeks ago. I knew that dogfish head was doing something along those lines. I was unclear to me then what amount of detail on the process itself they could derive from that.
I'll pick the brain of my professor paleo-botany as well on this subject. He works in Egypt a lot and know a thing or two about wheat and its uses. It's starting to look more and more like a good thesis subject.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

dasunt (249686) | about 10 months ago | (#45873037)

I wouldn't be surprised if it was a wild yeast, or closely related.

There's something called "wild fermentation", and it's used even today to make old fashioned foods like homemade sauerkraut. When it does is rely on wild fungi that's already on the raw food. You can even make wine with that technique.

It's also a common technique to use a bit of a good fermentation to "seed" the next batch.

If the Egyptians (and this is wild speculation on my part) were consuming a fermented porridge, or even making sourdough, perhaps one strain of the ferments became slowly more alcoholic.

Re:Any yeast found ? (4, Informative)

dasunt (249686) | about 10 months ago | (#45873087)

Just to add - it's also interesting to note that wild fermentation is an important way to preserve food and remove toxic organisms from it. Even the most common, non-alcoholic fermentation (lacto-fermentation), it tends to change the environment of the brew that toxic organisms can't survive. There's actually a history of what was called "small beer" in the west, which was a brew just alcoholic enough to kill off many pathogens. It was safer to drink than water in many areas.

Now consider this in the land of Egypt, where a large population living around one major water source (a river) without modern sewage treatment. It's probably safer to drink a fermented drink than the water directly.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

3.5 stripes (578410) | about 10 months ago | (#45878157)

Small beer was sterile at first, because like normal beer, the wort and water were boiled.. then the yeast and alcohol kept down other pathogens.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45874253)

Never heard of wine made that way, but Belgian Lambic beers use that technique.

They tend to be somewhat acidic, some have a cidery taste.

Re:Any yeast found ? (1)

dasunt (249686) | about 10 months ago | (#45875551)

You can make what's called "country wine" very easily with that technique.

For the curious, try googling "wild fermentation" and "wine".

Hognoxious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45882981)

Actually wine is still made that way with wild yeast in some parts of France. The press grape juice is placed in very large open to the air vats allowing the wild yeast to start the fermentation process...

Amazing... (1)

ImOuttaHere (2996813) | about 10 months ago | (#45871489)

I love it when things like this are uncovered. Beer making is such an old craft. It'd be interesting to see how that tasted. Anyone have an original recipe?

That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

ClassicASP (1791116) | about 10 months ago | (#45871547)

The reigning pharaoh at the time (Pharaoh Amenhotep III) had a reign that was relatively peaceful and uneventful. The beer explains it. When alcohol consumption by the population in general in any country goes down, the probability of a looming war goes up. When everyone calms down and has a drink, war probability goes down. Right now in Egypt alcohol sale restrictions have increased and stores have even been pressured to close shop by society in general, and we all have heard of the recent chaos as of late there. Its even happened to the United States. World War One started soon after prohibition.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871607)

Prohibition was in the 1920's, World War I was from 1914 to 1918. Please recompute theory.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

Gwala (309968) | about 10 months ago | (#45871813)

Prohibition didn't spring up out of no-where, Temperance was well established before WW1. The theory potentially holds.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45873893)

Prohibition didn't spring up out of no-where, Temperance was well established before WW1. The theory potentially holds.

Except that the U.S. did not enter the war until its 4th (?) year.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45873527)

And WWI didn't start in USA.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871683)

Didn't do anything for the Germans. They caused all the turmoil in Europe in the late 19th through the mid 20th centuries. And I'm sure there are some Mediterranean countries who would argue that they still are.

And all that beer - "Ya! Vee are zee master race! Einze mehr bitte!"

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

Boronx (228853) | about 10 months ago | (#45871863)

The bavarians never started any war.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#45872033)

Just that one Bavarian they've almost completely disowned.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45872417)

I think you'll find that the person you're thinking of was in fact Austrian.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 10 months ago | (#45873943)

Just that one Bavarian they've almost completely disowned.

He was from Austria. From a family with a long history of mental illness so you can't really describe his behavior as Austrian either.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

luckymutt (996573) | about 10 months ago | (#45875501)

The two greatest achievements of Austria are to have convinced the world that Hitler was German and that Beethoven was Viennese.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#45878283)

There are two types of 'Germans'. Prussians and Bavarians. Prussians (stereotype: goosestepping, no fun having) are mostly from Germany, Bavarians (stereotype: beer swilling and fat) are mostly from Austria.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 10 months ago | (#45881599)

There are two types of 'Germans'. Prussians and Bavarians. Prussians (stereotype: goosestepping, no fun having) are mostly from Germany, Bavarians (stereotype: beer swilling and fat) are mostly from Austria.

I've spent some time in Munich, the locals certain don't characterize themselves anything like that. From what they tell me they are Bavarians with German passports. Historically they've been a bit independent and catholic and not quite fitting the classic German stereotypes ... and they like it that way.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (4, Insightful)

gcore (748374) | about 10 months ago | (#45871867)

Please take into account that the beer made hundreds or thousands of years ago had very little alcohol. Things like enzymes, temperature rests, fermentable extract, FAN and sanitation was unheard of. Beer wasn't usually being drunk to get drunk. Beer was a more healthy alternative to water, since it contains a number of nutrients and energy, and also being harmless to drink since no known bacteria that's harmful to man can survive in beer.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

gcore (748374) | about 10 months ago | (#45871895)

If you drank water, you could die if it wasn't from a clean source. You can't die from drinking beer. Well, not from bacteria in beer anyway.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (4, Insightful)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#45872069)

Just wrong. Beer can go bad. The bacteria is killed when you boil the wort. Crack a bottle and let it sit out for a week, then report back.

Not enough alcohol in beer to make it an effective antiseptic. But enough alcohol in beer to get people drunk, even in ancient days.

Don't buy the neoprohibitionist narrative.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

gcore (748374) | about 10 months ago | (#45872339)

"no known bacteria that's harmful to man can survive in beer" was what I wrote, and that's true. Infected beer contains no bacteria that's harmful to humans. It can contain plenty of other bacterias though, Beer contains alcohol, alfa-acids, very little to no oxygen and co2. The bacteria that likes it there has no reason to like being inside humans. "Enough alcohol", yes, but it wasn't easy brewing strong beer in those days. Especially considering the bad sanitation.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45874347)

"no known bacteria that's harmful to man can survive in beer" was what I wrote, and that's true.

No it's not. And what about viruses?

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

spongman (182339) | about 10 months ago | (#45876193)

don't viruses require living host cells in order to propagate?

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

Bugamn (1769722) | about 10 months ago | (#45879737)

It is true. Viruses aren't bacteria.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#45878185)

An open, flat bottle of beer contains plenty of oxygen. Beer prior to bottling and metal kegs contained plenty of oxygen.

The only way you make week beer is by starting with low sugar wort. Which is relatively difficult. Too little sugar and fermentation doesn't run right as the yeast is unhappy and gets out-competed. This is especially true for processes that use natural yeast.

The reason beer is relatively sanitary is you boil the wort. Wine at, 12% alcohol has useful antiseptic qualities.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

ClassicASP (1791116) | about 10 months ago | (#45872467)

Well if it had very little alcohol, maybe they drank a whole lot of it, plus drank it while consuming other drugs and substances. When I look at that hieroglyph shown in the ad, I'm seeing on the bottom row 3rd from the left what appears to be a guy sporting a HUGE beer gut, plus he has a refer-smoking buddy across standing on the opposite side of the table in front of him. Plus I think those folks bottom right are playing music. Compared to today that matches up pretty accurately to typical college party life.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

umafuckit (2980809) | about 10 months ago | (#45872801)

Please take into account that the beer made hundreds or thousands of years ago had very little alcohol. Things like enzymes, temperature rests, fermentable extract, FAN and sanitation was unheard of.

This sounds like bollocks to me. For starters, we've been distilling for hundred of years (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distilled_beverage#History_of_distillation). I'm sure people have been making strong (i.e. easy to get drunk with) beer and wine for centuries. The ancient Greeks reported as much (Google it). You don't need to know what an enzyme is to make an alcoholic beverage. You just need to have figured out the protocol by trial and error. e.g. It's only recently that we've understood what yeast is, but lack of that knowledge in earlier times didn't stop it being used inadvertently as a leavening agent or to produce alcohol. If you leave bread rising for too long it starts to smell of alcohol: none of this terribly difficult, you know.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (2)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 10 months ago | (#45874207)

Please take into account that the beer made hundreds or thousands of years ago had very little alcohol
That is complete nonsense.
Fermentation stops when the yeast can no longer live. Either due to lack of sugar or to an to high alcohol level.
So the alcohol level of old bear is mainly limited by the amount of malt/sugar they put into it.
There is no historical problem in making a 7% vol alcohol beer.

and also being harmless to drink since no known bacteria that's harmful to man can survive in beer.
That is nonsense as well. Beer is a perfect nutrition for many bacteria. If you can not keep it clear of them, they grow easy, as the typical alcohol level (5%) is much to low to prevent them from flourishing.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

spongman (182339) | about 10 months ago | (#45876197)

Beer is a perfect nutrition for many bacteria

but how many of those will make you sick?

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 10 months ago | (#45877729)

Most bacteria that make you sick can easy survive in beer. But they can not get into a closed bottle ;D
During brewing (several repeated heatings), the bacteria already in it get killed. Afterwards the matter is how sterile you can keep the beer.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45874959)

The ancient egyptians used to brew 3 batches of beer per batch of "mash".
Brew 1: Strong, potent, and normally reserved for the pharaohs and other powers-that-be. (Approx 7% and up)
Brew 2: Mid strength, handed out to the workers with their evening meals. (3-6%)
Brew 3: Weak, or "small beer", which is what was drunk during the working day (2%-ish)

This method has been used for millenia, even before we discovered the exact chemistry of beer making and refined the process.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 10 months ago | (#45872095)

Right now in Egypt alcohol sale restrictions have increased and stores have even been pressured to close shop by society in general, and we all have heard of the recent chaos as of late there.

Egypt's first revolution started with protests in late January of 2011. Please recompute theory.

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45872121)

"Coincidence vs causation, what's this now? It's a result of dinosaurs, you see, because they came before."

Re:That Explains the Peace in Egypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45884141)

Hitler gave his early speeches in beer halls.

Pyramidology (2)

kaoshin (110328) | about 10 months ago | (#45871595)

The ration for an pyramid labourer included a measure of beer although supervisors got to have jugs. The only reason the Giza pyramids were built is because everyone was totally blitzed. Interestingly enough, beer is often seen in modern pyramid structures. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Pyramidology (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45874365)

supervisors got to have jugs

Positive discrimination, even back then...

In addition to religious uses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871677)

The production was offered for sale during chariot races, when the masses felt obligated to be appropriately lubed and 'faced.

His name was..? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45871709)

Pstasanute? Phulasamop? Psolsdagen?

mmm... beer (2)

Werrismys (764601) | about 10 months ago | (#45873129)

"beer's pivotal role in the civilization of humankind" I'll drink to that. Kippis.

Re:mmm... beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45873269)

To Beer!

The cause, and solution to, all of mankind's problems!

*klink*

Available for drinking at Kyoto University (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45873279)

As the article implies, this tomb was discovered by Japanese archeologists.

At Kyoto University, where I study, archeological students have whipped up a similar brew using ancient Egyptian recipes found in a tomb like this one.

They have bottled it under the label "Ruby Nile" and sell it at the school store, cafeterias and campus cafes.

Link: http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/news_data/h/h1/news7/2009/090420_1.htm

Hmmm (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45874391)

The article doesn't say if the tomb's owner was still in there.

If not, he's probably shuffling around looking for his keys.

Re:Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45874993)

But it does state that he died by drowning in a vat of his own brew.

It also states that he was courteous enough to get out 5 times to take a piss.

That explains the inscription (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45880903)

Carved in the stone of the tomb: RDWHAHB

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