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170 comments

There were 10 types of ancient societies (4, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | about 4 months ago | (#45708877)

Those who understood binary, and those who didn't.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (5, Funny)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 4 months ago | (#45709043)

I thought they invented polynomials.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (4, Funny)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 4 months ago | (#45709201)

They also used coconut shells as both bowls and for fuel. Polymorphism, if you will.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 months ago | (#45709551)

So now they are also credited with OOP? What's next, a professor on the island who makes nuclear reactors out of cocoanuts, cave rocks, and urine from a Hollywood babe wearing an "S.S. Minnow" dress?

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709581)

So now they are also credited with...What's next...

Yes, they are polymaths.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (1)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | about 4 months ago | (#45709513)

I thought they invented polynomials.

No polynomials were invented by the Bhinese.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710297)

But the Polynesians speak Bhinese. They're polyglots.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709141)

If you RTFA this joke has double meaning ;-)

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 4 months ago | (#45709169)

That is a very old joke. I first heard it at least 10100 years ago...

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709317)

I think AC was referring to the fact that these people did not use binary. They just had special words for 10 and a few multiples of 10 like 20, 40 & 80.

There are 10 types of people who understand AC's joke: those who RTFA and those who didn't.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710147)

Someone needs to hit these "researchers" upside the head with an Abacus and a copy of the I Ching.

Re:There were 10 types of ancient societies (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 4 months ago | (#45710529)

Actually, there are 10 types of people: Those who understand Arabic numerals and applied them to binary, and all the rest.

How is this news? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45708893)

Different cultures have been counting in bases other than base-10 for all of human history. Of course a gentleman in the 18th century wasn't the first to use binary.... that's preposterous.

The Mayans, for example, counted in based 20 (supposedly because they counted on both their fingers and, thanks to a warm climate, exposed toes).

Re:How is this news? (5, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about 4 months ago | (#45709151)

There was a Mayan tribe that went around naked. The men used base 21 and the women base 22

Re:How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710301)

There was a Mayan tribe that went around naked. The men used base 21 and the women base 22

The men could have used based 23.

Re:How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710509)

The male Mayans used base 21 because they weren't fat enough to use base 23; it's opposite of the reason that most male /.ers can only use base 22 -- because they're not long enough to use base 23.

Re:How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710937)

There was a Mayan tribe that went around naked. The men used base 21 and the women base 22

The men could have used based 23.

Only those with moobs.

Re:How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709171)

That would mean that women counted in 20's and men counted in 21's. Thus the start of the communication problems between the sexes.

Weak evidence indeed (1)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | about 4 months ago | (#45709187)

Different cultures have been counting in bases other than base-10 for all of human history.

Yes, the actual article discusses that.

The article, however, is remarkably weak in support for the hypothesis that the people of Mangareva (the "tiny Pacific island" mentioned) actually used binary arithmetic, since in fact it doesn't give any evidence at all that they actually used binary arithmetic. What it says is they have number words for three binary powers of ten:paua for 20; tataua for 40; and varu for 80.

The jump from there to "thus clearly they invented binary arithmetic" is speculation. They state that none of the islanders use binary arithmetic now, and there's no record they once did-- just those words for binary-multiples-of-ten.

Of course a gentleman in the 18th century wasn't the first to use binary.... that's preposterous.

I don't know what is "of course" about that statement. There doesn't seem to be any evidence of anybody using binary before then. Maybe somebody did, but it seen they didn't tell anybody.

Re:Weak evidence indeed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710071)

There doesn't seem to be any evidence of anybody using binary before then.

The Chinese Abacus dates back to at least the 2nd Century BC. That's pretty solid proof, even if the researchers don't understand how to use one. (Hint- look at the top row)
Also, ever heard of the yin/yang symbol? How about the I Ching? Both philosophical systems are based on the concept of a binary universe.

Re:Weak evidence indeed (3, Informative)

icebike (68054) | about 4 months ago | (#45710271)

The article, however, is remarkably weak in support for the hypothesis that the people of Mangareva (the "tiny Pacific island" mentioned) actually used binary arithmetic, since in fact it doesn't give any evidence at all that they actually used binary arithmetic. What it says is they have number words for three binary powers of ten:paua for 20; tataua for 40; and varu for 80.

The article wasn't so much weak, as it was in awe of an accident of hindsight. (It only looks "special" because we settled on binary for computers.)
It explicitly made the point that base 10 was used except to refer to large groups.
Their "special words" took hold only after they ran out of fingers.

In fact, if you look at it as counting the number of "bodies worth of fingers and toes" it looks less like using binary and more like "We can't count that high, but there was one fish in the pond for every finger and toe of each person in our boat). After that they just counted boats.

Its really not much different than westerners counting in dozens, and grosses (something that wiki unconvincingly attributes to the convenience of 12 having many divisors [wikipedia.org]. From the same article you learn there were Latin terms for groups of 15, 20, etc. It seems that special, extra ordinal counting numbers for baskets full of stuff are not that unusual.

Re:Weak evidence indeed (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 4 months ago | (#45710665)

You've got it nailed. There is nothing in the article to suggest that Polynesians used base two. Wild speculation based on a few words in an almost extinct language. Wow. There is more evidence to support the idea that ancient space men visited the earth at various times, and THAT evidence is exceedingly thin.

Re:How is this news? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 4 months ago | (#45710785)

Its not news, as indicated by the journalistic codeword "may" as in "there MAY not actually be a story here but its good for click-throughs, so we're going to run it anyways".

Its very similar to Bettridge's Law of headlines: If a headline uses the word "may", you can generally assume that there will be little actual substance and a lot of overstatement in the article.

"Discovered" would be more appropriate (2)

jatoo (2393402) | about 4 months ago | (#45708909)

Binary mathematics was always there.

Australian aborigines have been known to use the binary system as well.

Being able to count to 512 on your fingers can be handy!

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (5, Funny)

PIBM (588930) | about 4 months ago | (#45708949)

I'm sorry for you! If you had all of your fingers, you'd make it to 1023!

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709029)

GP probably uses signed integers.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (5, Funny)

mugnyte (203225) | about 4 months ago | (#45709395)

That's called thumb's-complement - still in IEEE committee, but quite handy.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (2)

pesho (843750) | about 4 months ago | (#45709073)

The only number that i need to count in binary on my fingers is 4: oo1oo

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709991)

132, my son.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709087)

You must be from Chernobyl - most non-mutants can only get to 255 using their fingers alone!

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709341)

You only have 8 fingers?

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709885)

Yep. At least I'm not all thumbs!

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

hguorbray (967940) | about 4 months ago | (#45709189)

then there is one, two, many (oblig xkcd) http://xkcd.com/764/

http://numberwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/07/30/is-one-two-many-a-myth/

-I'm just sayin'

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (2)

dgatwood (11270) | about 4 months ago | (#45710251)

Not sure if one, two, many is a myth, but one to many is a database relationship.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710391)

One to many is a your mom relationship.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#45709427)

I'm sorry for you! If you had all of your fingers, you'd make it to 1023!

Floating point will get you further, if you don't mind loosing some digits of precision.. Should work great for 4 digits at +- E16 - E-16.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (1)

djdanlib (732853) | about 4 months ago | (#45708993)

Either you're using a sign bit, or you are missing a finger. 10 bits gets you a range of 0-1023 or 1-1024.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (1)

Roachie (2180772) | about 4 months ago | (#45709019)

Lets not forget finger #11

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (2)

sconeu (64226) | about 4 months ago | (#45709083)

You have six fingers on your right hand.... Someone is looking for you.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709369)

You have six fingers on your right hand.... Someone is looking for you.

"You killed my father, prepare to DIE!

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (1)

icebike (68054) | about 4 months ago | (#45710313)

If you are holding a 6th finger in your right hand, the left hand must be taking the selfie.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709037)

'Sign bit' is my dick's name you insensitive clod.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709419)

So you are always negative when good looking women are around..... Sorry for you.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709211)

Just don't count to 132 while facing someone... they might take it the wrong way.

Re:"Discovered" would be more appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709509)

Isn't that when you're behind someone?

Professor Farnsworth Says... (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 4 months ago | (#45708999)

Bad News, Everyone!

It turns out that we've been trying to figure out binary math for hundreds of years longer than previously believed, which means we humans are worse at math than we thought!

FTFA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709033)

But their special counting words are all decimal numbers multiplied by powers of two, which are 1, 2, 4, 8 . Specifically, takau equals 10; paua equals 20; tataua, 40; and varu, 80. Those big numbers are useful for keeping track of collections of valuable items, such as coconuts, that come in large numbers.

There must be a Gilligan's Island joke in here somewhere...

Sounds like they're trying to hard (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709041)

So this tribe had special numbers for 10, 20, 40, and 80, so that means they had a binary number system? That's a big stretch. That probably means they counted on two people's fingers and toes.

BTW the French word for eighty is quatre-vingt (four twenties). Same idea, probably.

Re:Sounds like they're trying to hard (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709253)

I thought the same thing but then I realized that anthropologists don't get much ink anymore and once in a while we have to throw them a bone (I mean how many Tutankhamuns are out there anymore?).

BTW the French word for eighty is quatre-vingt (four twenties). Same idea, probably.

I guess that's why this island is in French Polynesia?

What's with this "may"? (5, Insightful)

newcastlejon (1483695) | about 4 months ago | (#45709047)

Either they did or they didn't.

Re:What's with this "may"? (1)

flaming error (1041742) | about 4 months ago | (#45709385)

"If God forks the Universe every time you roll a die, he'd better have a damned good memory."

What's with this "if"? Either He does or He doesn't.

Re:What's with this "may"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709391)

I think "may" implies a lack of certainty whether they did or they didn't. It's generally that, or the fifth month of the Gregorian calendar.

Language (2)

Dan East (318230) | about 4 months ago | (#45710105)

Studies of the Mangareva language in the 1930s recorded that it contained specific words for 10, 20, 40 and 80. Sort of like how English has special words "dozen" and "score" for specific quantities. Their culture and language has been nearly obliterated by external influences over the centuries, so all that remains is the fact that they had special words (beyond their normal numbers) for those values. That could be pure coincidence, or it could indicate that they worked with binary numbers and thus had special words for 0b0001, 0b0010, 0b0100 and 0b1000.

The thing that doesn't make much sense to me is why they would have multiplied their binary digits by decimal 10. Instead of special words for 1, 2, 4 and 8 they have special words for 10, 20, 40 and 80, and that doesn't make any sense mathematically. Unless originally they used binary and had special words for 1, 2, 4 and 8, then gradually adopted decimal. The special words for such small numbers wouldn't have been useful, so the meaning switched to indicate 10 times that value. 10, 20, 40 and 80 would be useful quantities to have special words for when it comes to trading, buying and selling, and even talking about a person's age.

Either way, it sure seems to hint that they used binary math at some point in the past.

Re:What's with this "may"? (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about 4 months ago | (#45710207)

But that is a much more catchy headline than simply stating that they probably used binary math for some things.

They may not. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710327)

God wills it, save the queen!

Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709059)

So many easy divisors.

Re:Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 months ago | (#45709115)

Or how about Base 13 just to fsck with people and make math teachers rich. It would also make QWERTY look sane in comparison.

Re:Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709217)

Clocks are base 12, so are feet.

Re:Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709285)

I keep hearing this argument in the favor of the imperial system... but we have this magical thing called decimals.

Re:Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710097)

I keep hearing this argument in the favor of the imperial system... but we have this magical thing called decimals.

Decimals are imprecise. For example, try writing the EXACT (not approximate) value of 1/3 (one third) in decimal. Or "pi". Have fun with that.

Re:Too bad we didn't settle on base 12 (1)

mc6809e (214243) | about 4 months ago | (#45710633)

Decimals have nothing to do with it.

Base 12 is incredibly convenient for breaking up one thing into several parts in many ways. A dozen divided in half gives six each. Into thirds gives 4 each. Into fourths gives 3 each. Into sixths gives 2 each.

Easy.

But anyway, even duodecimal is somewhat easier than decimal, too.

Base 10

1/2 = 0.5
1/3 = 0.3333...
1/4 = 0.25
1/5 = 0.2
1/6 = 0.1666...
1/7 = 0.142857...
1/8 = 0.125
1/9 = 0.1111...

Base 12 (using A for 10 and B for 11)

1/2 = 0.6
1/3 = 0.4
1/4 = 0.3
1/5 = 0.2497...
1/6 = 0.2
1/7 = 0.186...
1/8 = 0.16
1/9 = 0.14

bool (1)

Citizen of Earth (569446) | about 4 months ago | (#45709061)

Why are variables called "bool"s instead of "leib"s?

Re:bool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709459)

Why are variables called "bool"s instead of "leib"s?

Because boolean variables can hold true or false as values. Binary is a way to represent numbers. I'm not sure how you could consider them the same, except that bits in binary have two possible values 0 or 1 and a boolean variable can have two possible values true or false.

Re:bool (1)

hazah (807503) | about 4 months ago | (#45710803)

I hope you realize that it's boolean logic that gives rise to these representations of numbers and their manipulations. Addition circuitry uses boolean logic. Flipflops (basic ram circuitry) use boolean logic. It's all boolean, based on "and", "or" and "not" alone. Once in the processor, they are, in fact, the same.

If only we had eight fingers (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 4 months ago | (#45709105)

I always thought that mathematics would have progressed much faster if humans had either four or eight fingers on each hand instead of five.

Re:If only we had eight fingers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709227)

I only have 8 fingers.......and 2 thumbs!!!

Binary is much older than Leibniz... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709179)

Leibniz freely admits that he took ideas from the I Ching: http://www.leibniz-translations.com/binary.htm

What is amazing in this reckoning is that this arithmetic by 0 and 1 is found to contain the mystery of the lines of an ancient King and philosopher named Fuxi, who is believed to have lived more than 4000 years ago, and whom the Chinese regard as the founder of their empire and their sciences.2 There are several linear figures attributed to him, all of which come back to this arithmetic, but it is sufficient to give here the Figure of the Eight Cova, as it is called, which is said to be fundamental, and to join to them the explanation which is obvious, provided that one notices, firstly, that a whole line — means unity, or 1, and secondly, that a broken line -- means zero, or 0.

The Chinese lost the meaning of the Cova or Lineations of Fuxi, perhaps more than a thousand years ago, and they have written commentaries on the subject in which they have sought I know not what far out meanings, so that their true explanation now has to come from Europeans. Here is how: It was scarcely more than two years ago that I sent to Reverend Father Bouvet,3 the celebrated French Jesuit who lives in Peking, my method of counting by 0 and 1, and nothing more was required to make him recognize that this was the key to the figures of Fuxi. Writing to me on 14 November 1701, he sent me this philosophical prince's grand figure, which goes up to 64, and leaves no further room to doubt the truth of our interpretation, such that it can be said that this Father has deciphered the enigma of Fuxi, with the help of what I had communicated to him. And as these figures are perhaps the most ancient monument of [GM VII, p227] science which exists in the world, this restitution of their meaning, after such a great interval of time, will seem all the more curious.

"Ethiopian" or "Egyprian" multiplication (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709281)

This uses binary math, though not quite explicitly: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_multiplication

Cretinous Article (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709329)

Why is it that people who are actually terrible at understanding the basics of maths think that because they express an interest, they are some kind of mathematical genius.

There is NOTHING inherently special in binary, base10 or whatever. What ***IS*** special is the realisation of using ANY form of number-base system to handle calculations. The same garbage about a particular base choice being 'magic' led the French morons experimenting with so-called decimal systems for times and dates- fundamentally ignoring why we have 12 hours to a half-day, and 60 minutes to an hour (here's a clue- how many ways can you divided these numbers, and get whole number results?).

Base2 is the WORST possible base choice for a general counting and calculation system for people. Morons dribble "it's used in 'computing' so it must be clever". As soon as base arithmetic was invented, mathematicians KNEW about base2 as a special case of base-n. How can people here be so thick they do not get this? Was high-school maths really this hard for you to understand.

Knowing you can use base2 (binary) is NOT having a practical reason to deploy base2. Only when binary state computing was developed did the use of Base2 (or base8, or base16) make sense. Any society using base2 in a pre-computer age can be labelled as seriously retarded.

AGAIN. All base arithmetic follows the same principles. Therefore an awareness of base-x, where x is a specific integer, gives awareness of any base-n, where n is any positive integer greater or equal to 2.

Re:Cretinous Article (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#45709619)

There is NOTHING inherently special in binary, base10

Oh but there is. Count your fingers. People normally have 10 fingers, so base 10 is how language defined the basic numbers. Once we started writing things down, place value creeps in and we have the decimal system.

Mathematically, there is no unique reason to use base 10 except that one has to invent new digits when you go above 9 (OK above F for you Hex types). Binary, Octal and Hex are all used for convenience because the devices we have use multiples of 4 bits (usually). We used base 10 when all we had was fingers. What base you use is about what makes the problem easy. More often than not, that's going to be decimal, unless perhaps you are working with computers doing hardware interfaces.

The Chinese (of course) (5, Interesting)

nightcats (1114677) | about 4 months ago | (#45709337)

Perhaps an apocryphal story, but it goes that Leibniz was introduced to the I Ching (Yijing) oracle by a Catholic missionary friend who had gotten it translated into Latin (must have been strange). Anyway, the story goes that Leibniz instantly recognized the binary system in the 64 hexagrams and 8 trigrams. The I Ching is somewhere between 2,500 and 4,000 yrs. old in the format and ordering it still has today.

Re:The Chinese (of course) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710193)

As I have mentioned in many previous posts, the Chinese have often lead the way in technology but failed to capitalize on it due to political stupidity.

We ask for cheap shit and people complain that we get cheap toxic shit? The Chinese are ahead of the US in terms of education and there are many smart people doing progressive technology there.

Due to leprasy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709437)

Because when you only have one digit left ... yes, ONE!

Dear World (3, Funny)

Arancaytar (966377) | about 4 months ago | (#45709655)

You now owe us royalties on every digital computer built in the last century. Please pay the total of one gazillion dollars to the following bank account.

-Signed, Polynesia

Re:Dear World (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45709993)

You now owe us royalties on every digital computer built in the last century. Please pay the total of one gazillion dollars to the following bank account.

-Signed, Polynesia

Of course, here, take this freshly minted gazillion dollar coin. Good luck finding change.

Re:Dear World (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710023)

You now owe us royalties on every digital computer built in the last century. Please pay the total of one gazillion dollars to the following bank account.

-Signed, Polynesia

Yes, let me know how that works out. I hear the Romans are still trying to collect on the written representation for the decimal system.

Re:Dear World (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710031)

Dang.. I thought we already had paid enough for Bikini Atoll... So, how about we order up some more tests eh?

Re:Dear World (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710409)

Is that a binary gazillion or a "hard drive" gazillion?

Europeans used binary before Liebniz or Polynesia (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710047)

Humans used binary long before Leibniz and long before the Polynesians mentioned in the article. For one example:

2 tablespoons = 1 ounce
2 ounces = 1 jack
2 jacks = 1 gill
2 gills = 1 cup
2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart
2 quarts = 1 pottle
2 pottles = 1 gallon
2 gallons = 1 peck
2 pecks = 1 kenning
2 kennings = 1 bushel
2 bushels = 1 strike
2 strikes = 1 coomb
2 coombs = 1 hogshead
2 hogsheads = 1 butt

"Invent" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710233)

Did they "invent" it or "become aware of" binary math?

Binary - A Number System With Only Two Digits (4, Insightful)

TranquilVoid (2444228) | about 4 months ago | (#45710439)

So, decades of stories containing obscure acronyms deemed unworthy of explanation, now the editors decide binary needs to be defined for the Slashdot audience.

Re:Binary - A Number System With Only Two Digits (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 4 months ago | (#45710607)

Binary - A Number (counting) System (way of doing) With Only Two (one more than one and one less than one more than one more than one) Digits (stick like things [above your waist] that are on your hands [digital things in your pants]).

Whoopdie Freakin Doo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45710477)

Without electricity or plumbing, binary is just a waste of numerals.

That's not binary (1)

Megane (129182) | about 4 months ago | (#45710911)

But their special counting words are all decimal numbers multiplied by powers of two, which are 1, 2, 4, 8 . Specifically, takau equals 10; paua equals 20; tataua, 40; and varu, 80.

That's not binary, it's BCD.

That would be cool! (1)

edibobb (113989) | about 4 months ago | (#45710981)

Did they use 2's complements like we do? How did they handle their floating point operations? Alas, it's a cruel trick. If you read the article, you'll see some brainless twits are hyping this otherwise legitimate paper, and the Mangarevans didn't really use binary math. They just multiplied by 2.
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