×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Artificial Blood Made In Romania

timothy posted about a year ago | from the high-demand-in-local-market dept.

Medicine 232

First time accepted submitter calinduca writes "Artificial blood that could one day be used in humans without side effects has been created by scientists in Romania. The blood contains water and salts along with a protein known as hemerythrin which is extracted from sea worms. Researchers from Babe-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, hope it could help end blood supply shortages and prevent infections through donations." Wikipedia's entry on hemerythrin explains its unusual oxygen binding mechanism.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Makes sense (5, Funny)

Bohnanza (523456) | about a year ago | (#45291717)

Transylvania is in Romania

Vlad's Synth Blood Bank, how many I help you? (4, Informative)

themushroom (197365) | about a year ago | (#45291755)

I just used my last karma point on the pen-testing post, but I was thinking similarly.

Re:Makes sense (3, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | about a year ago | (#45291809)

Indeed, quality control issues: solved.

Re:Makes sense (2)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about a year ago | (#45291819)

Yes but does the blood taste of chicken

Re:Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292033)

Yes but does the blood taste of chicken

Alas, no. More like sea worm.

Right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291857)

Looks like vampire slayers were at the top of their game back in 2004 [independent.co.uk] , but now it appears that vampires have the upper hand.

Re:Makes sense (2)

carlosap (1068042) | about a year ago | (#45292051)

trueblood

ick (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292171)

trueblood : salty seaworm flavor.
ick
side effects may include zombieism

also, I need blood::take mine just in time for memeoween

Re:ick (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45292789)

Pleasing taste ... some monsterism.

Re:Makes sense (1)

Frohboy (78614) | about a year ago | (#45292059)

And Cluj specifically is in Transylvania

Re:Makes sense (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292077)

Tablets and computers in the classroom is a Trasnsylvanian conspiracy to reduce the amount of wooden pencils in schools everywhere. Now this.

Re: Makes sense (1)

Niterios (2700835) | about a year ago | (#45292345)

The vegan vampire community is growing. I heard they are working on vegan sunscreen too.

Re:Makes sense (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about a year ago | (#45292509)

Predictable even before I came into this article =)

Re:Makes sense (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#45292677)

I was about to say... shouldn't be difficult given that it's the home of the good Count

This HAS to be a Halloween joke, right? (2)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year ago | (#45292767)

Isn't it bad enough that we get so many of these bogus stories on April 1st?

Re:Makes sense (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about a year ago | (#45292913)

Not just that. The research facility for this *is* in Transylvania.

In before... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291731)

...terrible Dracula jokes, Hallowe'en edition.

Let the Transylvanian jokes commence! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291747)

heh. Romania, Dracula, Artificial blood, Halloween ... the late night talk show writers should have a field day with this one if it isn't some sort of elaborate ruse.

Re:Let the Transylvanian jokes commence! (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45291867)

It coming from the daily fail I had my doubts, so I followed a link from them to softpedia, that had a link to a Romanian news source, I don't know Romanian though to know if it is an Onion like site or not.

http://www.descopera.ro/dnews/11576517-inventia-extraordinara-a-unui-cercetator-din-cluj-sangele-artificial-creat-cu-ajutorul-viermilor-marini-galerie-foto [descopera.ro]

Re:Let the Transylvanian jokes commence! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292271)

It coming from the daily fail I had my doubts, so I followed a link from them to softpedia, that had a link to a Romanian news source, I don't know Romanian though to know if it is an Onion like site or not.

http://www.descopera.ro/dnews/11576517-inventia-extraordinara-a-unui-cercetator-din-cluj-sangele-artificial-creat-cu-ajutorul-viermilor-marini-galerie-foto [descopera.ro]

Here are some links:

http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Radu_Silaghi/publications/ [researchgate.net]

http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/world-our-backyard/2013/oct/31/romanian-scientists-create-artificial-blood/ [washingtontimes.com]

Re:Let the Transylvanian jokes commence! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292391)

I don't know Romanian either, but from what I can understand as a Spanish-speaker it is a serious site. Serious in the "we're not joking" sense, though, not serious in the "scientific rigour" sense. I think "descopera" means "discover" or "discovery".

Re:Let the Transylvanian jokes commence! (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292595)

Sometimes serious sites put up bullshit on holidays, but they usually put in some disclaimer. I would not be able to recognize a disclaimer in Romanian.

9 out of 10 vampires prefer real blood though (4, Funny)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#45291767)

But the fake stuff will do in a pinch.

Re:9 out of 10 vampires prefer real blood though (5, Funny)

JeanCroix (99825) | about a year ago | (#45291835)

Yep. You think the anti-GM food hippies are bad, just wait til the anti-artificial blood vampires get their protests going...

true blood (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291775)

But will the vampires be satisfied with it, and leave our womens alone? /hate sparkley, sexy vampires. they used to be cool when they were fiends, before they went all goth.

not flaming (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291777)

Would something like this be accepted by groups like Jehovah's Witness' that do not accept blood transfusions?

Re:not flaming (4, Insightful)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#45291843)

Why should we care? Evolution in action.

Re:not flaming (4, Interesting)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45291977)

Although I understand your sentiment, but many new surgical techniques have been made because of Jehovah witnesses refusal to accept blood transfusions. Many of these techniques end up being better than the one they replaced and therefor all of society gains benefits.

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292423)

"Many of these techniques end up being better than the one they replaced and therefor all of society gains benefits."

That's like saying that from all the crack babies born in the 80s, some went ahead and became doctors and programmers, so crack can't be all bad. If you are wasting public resources to do these type of interventions, then only luck could turn them into something else than waste. They are of course free to do whatever they want on their bodies, with their own money.

Re:not flaming (3, Interesting)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292539)

That's like saying that from all the crack babies born in the 80s, some went ahead and became doctors and programmers, so crack can't be all bad.

Actually it would be more along the lines of "War is hell, but at least we make healthcare advances because of it."

If you are wasting public resources to do these type of interventions, then only luck could turn them into something else than waste.

No, people who have trained their whole lives to save people don't come up with new lifesaving techniques due to "luck". And do you know if they are using public resources do do those type of interventions, or are you just making wild speculations in an attempt to bolster your case that there are no positives outcomes of bloodless surgery?

Re:not flaming (4, Informative)

eulernet (1132389) | about a year ago | (#45292715)

Citation needed !

To my knowledge, the new surgical techniques were invented to reduce operation's side-effects (less invasive surgery, less anesthetics, less hospital recovery).
It also reduces the cost of an operation.

I found no relation with Jehovah witnesses, so I'm curious to listen where you heard about this ?

Re:not flaming (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about a year ago | (#45292195)

Well, they are our peers and deserve respect.

Re:not flaming (5, Insightful)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#45292295)

I respect their choice to die rather then accept modern healthcare.

Re:not flaming (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292567)

This is a flamebaity question, but: do you respect that they make that choice for their children?

Re:not flaming (1, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#45292825)

I believe ether parent should be able to abort their children until the age of 18. They would call the school counselor and have the brat 'aborted'.

Re:not flaming (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292309)

No they don't. We respect what we admire. And people with silly beliefs that are harmful are not to be admired, just tolerated. And only as long as they are the only ones harmed.

Re:not flaming (0)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about a year ago | (#45292435)

says AC

Re:not flaming (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#45292475)

Not going to address his point?

Re:not flaming (0)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about a year ago | (#45292633)

There was no point.

Re:not flaming (2, Insightful)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#45292783)

WTF? Let me restate it for you: You don't need to respect morons, only tolerate them.

Re:not flaming (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292749)

I might find your beliefs utterly silly and without merit, but I can respect that you have your beliefs and that you stick to your beliefs.

It takes balls to go have surgery without the safety net of a blood transfusion, to not just tell the doctor "I'm not really all that religious, just save my life, whatever it takes."

Now if someone is making that decision for a child, lock the fucker up.

Re:not flaming (1)

Jeff Flanagan (2981883) | about a year ago | (#45292779)

Says an AC who's absolutely right, and who you have no response to. People don't get respect by default. They have to earn it, and people who are so religious that they're harming themselves and their children have not earned respect, but rather a response ranging from derision to jail-time depending on how much harm they cause.

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292461)

They are not my peers, I'm forced by circumstance to share a society which includes them. I would gladly choose a country where religion is viewed as a form of psychological disorder that one cannot claim as basis for infringing on the rights of others.

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292643)

Respect is earned, not deserved.

Re:not flaming (4, Informative)

CODiNE (27417) | about a year ago | (#45292627)

Accepting blood transfusions may not be selecting for the group you think it is.

If you dig around the references here Bloodless Surgery [wikipedia.org] you'll see a small portion of the studies which have shown the benefits of avoiding blood transfusions.

A scientifically minded person would applaud advances in synthetic blood and bloodless surgery, not get hung up on one sub-group of the people it benefits.

Re:not flaming (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#45291971)

From Wikipedia:

"Watch Tower Society publications teach that the Witnesses' refusal of transfusions of whole blood or its four primary components—red cells, white cells, platelets and plasma—is a non-negotiable religious stand and that those who respect life as a gift from God do not try to sustain life by taking in blood,[4][5] even in an emergency.[6] Witnesses are taught that the use of fractions such as albumin, immunoglobulins and hemophiliac preparations are "not absolutely prohibited" and a matter of personal choice.[5]"

It sounds like if you can call it blood, they won't take it. Doesn't matter where it's from. Of course, they could decide this is an exception because it's not "real" blood.

Re:not flaming (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45291989)

Something like this would probably end up being classified something along the lines of a "hemophiliac preparations" which is a grey area.

Re:not flaming (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about a year ago | (#45292079)

More for the rest of us i guess. Their choice.

Re:not flaming (2)

mspohr (589790) | about a year ago | (#45292117)

This Romanian compound appears to contain only salts and this protein from a sea worm. It should be considered to be no different than an ordinary IV solution from the J Witnesses' viewpoint. The hemerythrin protein would be similar to albumin (another protein).

However, we are dealing with religious beliefs here where people can make up all kinds of crazy stuff so hard to predict.

Re:not flaming (4, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | about a year ago | (#45292347)

Artificial blood almost certainly wouldn't count, though, as it isn't technically blood at all: blood in the religious context of Jehovah's Witnesses refers to the stuff flowing through the veins of animals. Basically, if it was never the "life" of an animal it wouldn't count. Of course, I'm not a Jehovah's Witness nor an expert on their theology, so I couldn't say for sure (but I have read the biblical passage the doctrine comes from, and I would say it absolutely doesn't include fake blood in any way).

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291997)

But it's made out of seashells. I'm sure there's a commandment about that. There ought to be.

Science and medicine should not bend over backwards to facilitate the delusions of these people. For each stupid thing like "bloodless surgery" we miss a useful drug or cure. Save their kids by force and let the adults live and die by a code invented 3000 thousand years ago by cave dwellers and goat herders.

Re:not flaming (1)

compro01 (777531) | about a year ago | (#45292527)

Bloodless surgery (or more properly, the use of techniques developed for bloodless surgery to do surgery with less blood) is useful. Even with good compatibility, transfusions still have side effects which you generally want to avoid and minimizing surgical blood use helps take some pressure off the blood supply and keep it available for stuff where blood is absolutely needed.

Re:not flaming (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292879)

Fortunately, Jehovah's Witnesses never litigate to force their belief systems onto others, but they will make efforts to ensure they can live by their beliefs as much as the next guy, whether that is going to court for freedom of speech or work with hospitals and doctors to pursue medical alternatives to blood transfusion.

Re:not flaming (4, Insightful)

quantumghost (1052586) | about a year ago | (#45292045)

Would something like this be accepted by groups like Jehovah's Witness' that do not accept blood transfusions?

That would be a good question. Having worked at a hospital that took over as the regional "bloodless center", I witnessed a wide variety of behaviors from JWs. Some were not very "orthodox" and would take blood, others only after consultation with their elder, others steadfastly refused. Apparently there is a lot of variation amongst individual "churches", but INAJW..

I'll tell you, a "bloodless" liver transplant is not for the faint of heart. I've been involved with a few transplants that required > 100 units of packed red cells. Doing these with none.....that stressed our skills to the max. And before you think that liver transplants can and therefore should be done bloodless...not all of bloodless ones survived. This would be a nice breakthrough.

It's interesting that this is still a cellular based concept, having to clone red cells and somehow transferring the hemerythrin. The linked article did not specify much detail.

Re:not flaming (2)

Amtrak (2430376) | about a year ago | (#45292507)

I'm not trying to cause a flamewar or anything but can someone explain to me why it would be "OK" to accept a new Liver but not Blood from a donor? I just don't see how getting cell type A from donor 1 is any different than getting cell type B. You are still violating "God's Gift of life" by taking cells from another.

To be clear IANAJW

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292873)

Why are you looking for logic here?

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292689)

having to clone red cells

Red cells have no nucleus, how do you "clone" them?

Grow them from stem cells, perhaps.

Re:not flaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292829)

There's actually not a difference among various "churches". The same doctrine is taught but ultimately it's up to an individual to make these decisions. So, the variation is actually from person to person, not necessarily congregation to congregation.

Re:not flaming (1)

ApplePy (2703131) | about a year ago | (#45292373)

Seems likely. Give this artificial blood enough years to become widely used, and they'll have to find something else to complain about.

Hopefully it will be something at least as useful.

Re:not flaming (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45292831)

I sincerely hope not. Give Darwin a chance!

True Blood? (1)

sqorbit (3387991) | about a year ago | (#45291779)

Does this mean True Blood will become a reality?

Dracula go on a diet? (0)

FudRucker (866063) | about a year ago | (#45291795)

fat vampires can not fly

TruBlood (2)

SirLoper (827094) | about a year ago | (#45291807)

I can't help myself but to notice the similarities between this and the fictional "TruBlood" as I'm sure everyone else will, too. Maybe this is just the precursor to the vamps integrating with our society! (not like the current versions we have in the US serving in Congress)

funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291875)

I find it hilarious that every one of us was thinking similar things. Mine was "How suspicious... artificial blood research from Dracula's backyard."

Re:funny (1)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about a year ago | (#45291923)

announced on Halloween...

Re:funny (1)

jonbryce (703250) | about a year ago | (#45292279)

Do Romanians celebrate Hallowe'en? It is celebrated in the Celtic nations such as Scotland and USA. In England, they only started celebrating it relatively recently.

Re:funny (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about a year ago | (#45292773)

Triduum of All Hallows [wikipedia.org] is a (Roman) catholic holiday starting today. I see no reason why that might not have bled over. Regardless of origin, once it's part of Catholic tradition, it tends to get around a bit.

(I'm aware that romania is mostly orthodox)

Re:funny (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292013)

I worked the trail backwards to a Romanian news source because it was just too coincidental, but since I don't read Romanian I stopped there.

Re:funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292331)

Re:funny (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292429)

The washington times story is just a copy/paste of the other article linked in the summary. The other link you provided is a list of all the publications Radu Silaghi has put out, this one is not listed there as far as I could tell.

US trials conducted years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291877)

We've been hearing this news for about a hundred years.

I remember reading a few years ago how US trials were already underway for similar synthetic bloods.

The disturbing part was how they were testing the product on emergency victims without their consent.

Polyheme and Hemopure... (1)

slew (2918) | about a year ago | (#45292269)

The one you are remembering was probably PolyHeme [wikipedia.org] . It wasn't a hundred years ago, but there technical and industrial barriers blocking the development of this type of product didn't really fall until the 70's.

The non-consent trial (technically opt-out, but you had to do it before you got your trama injury) for PolyHeme weren't just disturbing, Polyheme didn't perform well in these trials (for example, the chicago trial [chicagotribune.com] ). This is probably why you haven't heard much about this since that time.

Because of the blowback from the Polyheme trials, one of the competing products at the time Hemopure [wikipedia.org] never made it to similar trials and went BK. Part of the concern was that at least Polyheme was made from human blood, where Hemopure was made from cow blood.

This Hemerythrin stuff is chemically different, but may face the same issues as the earlier synthetic blood products in clinical trials and the inevitable marketing.

Re:Polyheme and Hemopure... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#45292541)

Why would trials be run this way as opposed to informed consent if the product was suspected to actually work?

Researchers from babe university (1)

slashmojo (818930) | about a year ago | (#45291925)

in vampire country make trublood on halloween - good show!

is it too much to ask (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291927)

to spell names correctly?
It's Babes-Bolyai University http://www.cci.ubbcluj.ro/,
Thank you,
AC

salt and worms (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45291931)

It looks like all the vampire jokes are covered already, so on to the actual subject.

From the summary and the wiki-link, this is a mixture of saltwater and an oxygen carrier molecule from certain worms. As long as it doesn't trigger any sort of allergy, this should work well for short duration needs (like surgery) and the simplicity of the chemicals suggests that it can bypass the protein marker issues with human blood supplies.

Problem solved (wipes hands) ... (4, Informative)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about a year ago | (#45292005)

And thus begins the plot of Daybreakers [wikipedia.org] .

The film takes place in a futuristic world overrun by vampires. A vampiric corporation sets out to capture and farm the remaining humans while researching a blood substitute. Lead vampire hematologist Edward Dalton's (Ethan Hawke) work is interrupted by human survivors led by former vampire "Elvis" (Willem Dafoe), who has a cure that can save the human species.

PolyHeme (4, Informative)

pete-classic (75983) | about a year ago | (#45292011)

Have we forgotten about PolyHeme? It isn't truly artificial (it is made from human hemoglobin), but it is not infectious and is not type specific. And it can be stored for a year at room temperature.

Re:PolyHeme (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year ago | (#45292121)

So how many pints of real blood do you need to make a pint PolyHeme, also how expensive is it?

With purely artificial blood you don't have to worry about how many people are donating blood, you just make more.

Re:PolyHeme (1)

0racle (667029) | about a year ago | (#45292149)

Looks like there may be a few issues [wikipedia.org] with PolyHeme. It would be interesting to see how this new stuff stacks up against the disadvantages of PolyHeme.

Of course, there's no reason there can't be two (or more) different solutions to the problem, that would probably be beneficial to the patient.

Re:PolyHeme (1)

rwise2112 (648849) | about a year ago | (#45292185)

Have we forgotten about PolyHeme? It isn't truly artificial (it is made from human hemoglobin), but it is not infectious and is not type specific. And it can be stored for a year at room temperature.

Apparently there are many [wikipedia.org] .

come out of hiding (1)

jblues (1703158) | about a year ago | (#45292035)

This project was sponsored by the Romanian government in the hope that the last of the remaining transylvanian vampires would be able to come out of hiding and live without persecution.

Re:come out of hiding (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292255)

It's a trap.

its, its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292091)

It is the trueblood! Vampires are about to be revealed to the world.

read Lumley (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#45292107)

Brian Lumley wrote about something very similar. Except the worms were vampires.

Interesting (1)

Arkiel (741871) | about a year ago | (#45292141)

Cold open to new Will Smith movie: the Worm People.

this project (1)

xXXxkatyaxXXx (2647807) | about a year ago | (#45292151)

ok haha very funny with the vampire jokes anyway,- i think this is a good project and smart as well!

Re:this project (1)

Punko (784684) | about a year ago | (#45292415)

With only 1/4 the oxygen pickup, this protein would likely not be a substitute for your own blood, but it could be something to tide you over until you could get a proper top up.

Re: this project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292827)

Your own body will produce new blood all by itself, if it's kept alive long enough to do so. This will just be good enough to get you by until then. You'd probably need to avoid exerting yourself because that would probably stress your heart due to the lower oxygen capacity of this blood, but it'd keep you alive until you recovered.

Cow Blood (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year ago | (#45292203)

You would thing the best and easiest way would just be to filter/treat cow blood in some way.

I won't even bother... (1)

Alejux (2800513) | about a year ago | (#45292409)

to make a Dracula joke. It would just be too easy.

controversy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292419)

Hydroperoxide, the high fructose corn syrup of O2 binding mechanisms.

Why not now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45292521)

So why can't it be used now?

Vampires are SAVED!!!! (1)

PortHaven (242123) | about a year ago | (#45292667)

Crap...now we're stuck with Edward for centuries to come.

Vampires and artificial blood (1)

sglines (543315) | about a year ago | (#45292731)

With luck this will end the vampire book and movie genre as we know it. Expect kinder and gentler vampires from now on. -SG

I thought they already did this (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | about a year ago | (#45292791)

Strange. I had heard about this concept back when I was a kid and was curious as to why I hadn't heard more about it since then.

Back when I was in school we used to get a little magazine called "Weekly Reader" and back around 1991-ish I remember them having an article about scientists having created artificial blood. It didn't have any disease fighting capability but could carry oxygen (and was apparently white in color before being used).

Purple blood (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a year ago | (#45292875)

Sign me up.

Old Man's War - Smart Blood (2)

rsborg (111459) | about a year ago | (#45292877)

Are we getting to where we could create this? IF we can replace blood completely or in part with a substance that has nanites that accomplish some tasks better - perhaps we're ready for SmartBlood.

From a blog synopsizing the technology[1]:

SmartBlood is a suspension of nanomachines that can, among its other abilities, instantly clot severe wounds. It has an increased oxygen-carrying capability, four times greater than ordinary human blood. In this, Scalzi is being very conservative. The "respirocytes" designed by Robert Freitas (1998) are cell-sized pressure tanks that can carry thousands of times the oxygen of an equivalent volume of erythrocytes. But perhaps the CDF doesn't possess full Drexlerian diamondoid nano tech.

[1] http://underbase.livejournal.com/49019.html [livejournal.com]

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?