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The Cryonics Institute Offers a Chance at Immortality (Video)

Roblimo posted 1 year,8 days | from the never-ever-refer-to-me-as-a-corpsicle-you-room-temperature-bag-of-bones dept.

Biotech 254

Do you want to be frozen after you die, in hopes of being revived a century or two (or maybe ten) in the future? It can cost less than an electric car. That's what the Cryonics Institute (CI) offers. David Ettinger, today's interviewee, is both the son of CI founder Robert Ettinger and CI's lawyer. In this video, among other things, he talks about arrangements that were made for his father's demise, and how they were able to start the cryopreservation process almost immediately after he expired. Is Cryonics the best chance at immortality for those of us likely to die before the Singularity arrives, and gives all of us the tools we need to live forever? David Ettinger obviously thinks so. (This is Video #1 of 2. The second one is scheduled to run tomorrow. It's an interview with CI Director Andy Zawacki, who takes us into the facility where the frozen bodies are stored.)

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already been done (4, Funny)

deadweight (681827) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611119)

I know a couple guys whose wives have been freezing cold for awhile and still move around and spend money.........

Slashvertisement (4, Interesting)

maxwell demon (590494) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611121)

Also, it's not immortality if they freeze you after you die.
Immortality means not to die at all.

Re:Slashvertisement (4, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611165)

While, frankly, I'm okay with resurrection, as a backup, there is no way I'm paying for a service I have to die to use. There is zero contract enforceability.

Also roblimo and his slashvertisements are all so blatant, it's insulting.

Re:Slashvertisement (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611563)

It's either I die and lose 50% of my assets to obama's death tax or I just get cryogenically frozen for $28k. I'll gladly take the chance because quite honestly that money was mine to begin with and it ain't going to be used by me if I'm dead.

Re:Slashvertisement (3, Informative)

Desler (1608317) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611591)

FYI: You can't be cryogenically frozen until you are legally dead.

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611663)

The current methods of cryogenically freezing you will make you legally dead. (That's the problem)

If they could non-destructively freeze and thaw you, it could be legal on a non-dead person.

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Desler (1608317) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611715)

Well of course the freezing would kill you if you were still alive, but you're already dead at that point anyway.

Re:Slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611571)

There is zero contract enforceability.

Then how does a will [wikipedia.org] work? Or are those not actually legally binding?

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

gl4ss (559668) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611861)

Then how does a will work? Or are those not actually legally binding?

there's limitations what a will can stipulate... in most countries what's done with the body is more like a wish than a legally enforceable demand.

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611575)

. . . there is no way I'm paying for a service I have to die to use. There is zero contract enforceability.

What about life insurance?

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Desler (1608317) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611791)

Maybe in part 2 they will freeze roblimo so we have to no longer suffer his shitty posts?

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Desler (1608317) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611809)

Shitty postsand videos, I should say.

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611865)

For $100k, I'll turn you into a unicorn after you die.

Also, who really believes this stuff? Like they don't immediately harvest your organs to install into existing buyers who are just waiting for you to kick it, anyway.

Re:Slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611217)

Not to worry. Once your cells erupt from the expanding ice, there will be no way to "thaw" you without your body turning into a watery, mushy pile of rancid meat.

Re:Slashvertisement (4, Informative)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611373)

usually they use a criofluid to suspend the whole system. Essentially your body is made to handle sodium, so they raise the salt content and then freeze you to below activation energy for all destructive reactions. This preserves your body from decay and locks it into a physical and chemical state that's non-destructive; however, resuming biological function is tricky. The reactions in the cells have to start back up again, and the salt levels in your blood need normalization; there needs to be oxygen supply and nutrient; and all macro-biology needs to resume (mainly heart beat and brain activity).

On the other hand, you'll find out immediately after you die if they have figured all of this out and not gone bankrupt. You'll wake up in the future. Medical care and insurance and longevity treatment covered for at least 2 years plus anything related to the cryo better be included, though.

Re:Slashvertisement (2)

oodaloop (1229816) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611519)

Medical care and insurance and longevity treatment covered for at least 2 years plus anything related to the cryo better be included, though.

And anticipation of feline complications. I don't want anything to happen to Mr. Bigglesworth!

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

Aaden42 (198257) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611873)

If they thawed me out & I never had to shave again? Hmmm.. Two for one!

Re:Slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611485)

The pseudoscience-hawking Slashdot's new motto: News for turds, stuff that splatters.

Define death. (1)

Valdrax (32670) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611683)

Also, it's not immortality if they freeze you after you die.
Immortality means not to die at all.

Define death.

It used to be that you died when your heart or breathing stopped. But now we can restart both. We even stop them regularly to repair the organs in question. Even brain death is problematic, when some drugs or conditions like hypoxia can temporarily shut down electrical activity. This is one reason that most hospitals require multiple checks a few hours or even a full day apart before declaring legal death. We are constantly pushing against the boundaries of what death is.

So, if your body fails, your brain is frozen, and you are repaired at a later date into a functional, conscious state, then did you ever really die?

Welcome to the World of Tommorrow!! (3, Funny)

TWiTfan (2887093) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611131)

Okay, I had to say it.

Re:Welcome to the World of Tom Tomorrow! (1)

ackthpt (218170) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611233)

Okay, I had to say it.

Sparky the Penguin says, "Hi!"

You misspelled "tomorrow!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611273)

I had to say that.

Re:You misspelled "tomorrow!" (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611561)

He didn't. By the time you get unfrozen, the World Leader will be Tom Morrow.

Re:You misspelled "tomorrow!" (1)

flargleblarg (685368) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611705)

I thought the world leader would be Tom Riddle.

I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611151)

I don't want to live forever, just merely a very very very long time. Is that so much to ask for?

Re:I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (4, Insightful)

lobiusmoop (305328) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611445)

It's funny. When I was in my 20's I wanted to live forever. Now, in my 40's, I sometimes wonder if it will ever end.

Re:I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611739)

Feel free to kill yourself... it's not that hard.

Re:I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611819)

LOL AC, no thanks, having too much fun.

Re:I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611825)

Feel free to kill yourself... it's not that hard.

Harder than you might expect. People fail all the time.

Re: I don't want to be immortal, just ancient. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611603)

But you already do live for a very very long time. Compared, for example, to the humble fruit fly, you are immortal!

Can I pay when I wake up? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611153)

If they really believe in their technology, they should have no problem with a payment plan that starts when you wake up...

I don't think you want that. (1)

Valdrax (32670) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611713)

If they really believe in their technology, they should have no problem with a payment plan that starts when you wake up...

Pray that never happens.

Welcome to Life: the singularity, ruined by lawyers [youtube.com]

Re:Can I pay when I wake up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611733)

While an interesting idea, the company still has things to pay for now. Like the electricity powering the equipment keeping you frozen, or the employees that make sure it does not malfunction. Plus, unless you're rich and/or have your money invested to keep up with inflation, you'll likely have to go back to school if you want to actually make a living in that future world.

Would they care to revive you even if they can? (1)

udachny (2454394) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611159)

So the only real question is: even when/if the technology is able to revive the frozen meat, why would they? So they have to revive you, they have to take care of you, they have to treat you from old age related and other diseases. What is there to gain for the people in the future by reviving you? The people who sell you the space in the fridge today won't be around to take an issue with and who exactly is going to take an issue on your behalf?

Even your possible distant future relatives, why would they want the headache of such a blast from the past?

Re:Would they care to revive you even if they can? (1)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611359)

If someone walked into an archaeology lab and said "Hey, we found this Neanderthal in the ice, and I think we can fix him" don't you think they'd give it a go, especially if they knew it would work?

It's likely that once society has advanced enough that we can revive geezercicles, we'll not begrudge them the expense of doing so.

Re:Would they care to revive you even if they can? (4, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611431)

Not if they found a million Neanderthals, all of whom would want jobs and a place to live.

Re:Would they care to revive you even if they can? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611433)

It's likely that once society has advanced enough that we can revive geezercicles, we'll not begrudge them the expense of doing so.

How do we know that "once society has advanced enough," they won't simply decide that the geezercicles aren't worth the time or energy? Or, if they do decide reviving an ancient relic of a bygone era (one they probably won't be able to communicate with, any more than we could communicate with a caveman), what makes you think they'll use the person as anything but a laboratory rat?

I suppose the point I'm trying to make is 2-fold - 1, some shit just ain't worth the effort, and 2, be careful what you wish for.

Re:Would they care to revive you even if they can? (1)

udachny (2454394) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611439)

Well sure, there will be experiments in reviving some of the frozen specimens, but experimenting is one thing, doing this on a mass scale is something else entirely. As to usefulness of the information that can be gathered from any individual, unless they were some very high profile historically relevant person, there isn't much at all that can be learned from anybody. It's pretty much useless, you can find out what their preferred food and TV shows were maybe, you can get their perspective, but one thing is for sure: you won't get an objective perspective and you won't get much insight into anything. Don't forget, there is a huge difference between the information that we have about the Neanderthals and information that will be available about our time in the future. There are enough historical records, papers, books, TV records, pictures, blogs, any personal movies, etc., that the information won't be the problem, the problem will be figuring out what the heck you want to look at.

Re:Would they care to revive you even if they can? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611429)

(-1, Correct)

BS on so many levels (3, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611185)

First, the crude cryonics they use today is not going to work well, and may well not leave anything that can be revived behind.

Second, why would anybody want to revive some corpses at huge expense when making a few children more is so much easier? Or why would anybody go through the effort of reviving anybody, when the world is over-populated in the first place? Well, maybe if you freeze some truly exceptionally people (like Fields-medal winners), that one may be different, but I doubt it. Everybody else is just going into the trash at some indefinite time in the future.

And third, why would anybody reasonably want to be unfrozen, when the world is massively changed and everybody they knew and cared about is gone? There are a few SF books that use long-term "storage" as punishment for the criminal, and they have it right.

Re:BS on so many levels (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611269)

Your chilled mushy brain will provide a delicious dessert for the people of the future.

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611311)

They need your knowledge of 20th century football to thwart hot evil alien princesses?

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611455)

By then we should already have the technology to stick an earthworm into an intelligent super-suit.

Oops, wrong franchise.

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611693)

No, they need someone who knows how "Single Female Lawyer" ends.

Re:BS on so many levels (3, Insightful)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611363)

And third, why would anybody reasonably want to be unfrozen, when the world is massively changed and everybody they knew and cared about is gone?

Because they could meet new people and learn a new world?

Why would people want to move from Europe to America in the 1700's?

Re:BS on so many levels (2)

oodaloop (1229816) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611567)

Imagine someone from the 1500s waking up now. Hey, welcome to the future. All of your morals are horribly outdated, everything you thought you knew about the world is at best laughably incomplete or more likely completely wrong, and the world has changed in every meaningful way. Good luck getting a job, finding a mate, or even crossing the street!

Re:BS on so many levels (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611645)

They can either join the Amish or move to the Middle East. Neither have left the 16th century.

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

flargleblarg (685368) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611801)

Imagine someone from the 1500s waking up now. Hey, welcome to the future. All of your morals are horribly outdated,...

Welcome to the future. All of your morals are belong to us!

Re:BS on so many levels (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611605)

Why would people want to move from Europe to America in the 1700's?

A number of methods were used to encourage immigration, among them outrageous promises of riches to be had in the new land, prison alternative for convicted criminals, and outright kidnapping.

Quack science is for quackers (1)

chuckinator (2409512) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611385)

Nailed it in one. Quack science is for quacks, and no amount of explaining why it's quackery will convince them otherwise.

Re:BS on so many levels (2)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611425)

There are a few SF books that use long-term "storage" as punishment for the criminal, and they have it right.

Maybe they just really enjoy Taco Bell.

Re:BS on so many levels (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611483)

1: This may or may not be true, but I guarantee you'll get a more educated discussion out of it arguing with cryonics folk than saying it in a setting where nobody has the relevant knowledge to formulate a counter-argument.

2: Historic relevance, for one. And why not? You claim "the world" is overpopulated. Go ahead and show me any scientific evidence that says, word for word, "the entire world is overpopulated in every single area." You can't; it's bull. Some places are overpopulated; the world as a whole is just fine.

3: That's not for you to decide. It's my decision. I want the procedure done for my own reasons; your personal misgivings about it mean nothing to me. With regards to the two reasons you gave, my responses are, respectively: I'd rather adapt to change than be dead, and I'd rather move on and make new friends than be dead (this also applies to me pre-cryonization; I'm not going to kill myself when my friends/loved ones start dying, and I should hope you won't, either).

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

gweihir (88907) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611759)

A) you are an anonymous coward and hence beneath notice.
B) I expended the time to read your posting nonetheless, and nothing you any is of any value, just as is to be expected of an AC.

Re:BS on so many levels (1)

Valdrax (32670) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611849)

Two is really the biggest problem. Unless you've done something historically exceptional or somehow racked away money in some sort of structure that won't be immediately raided by your successors, then no one will be interested except maybe some curiosity seekers or people who just want to prove after all this time that it can be done (and is now available for sale to the general public).

As for three, I would eagerly embrace the chance to see a new world with new advances in science and the arts. It would also be fascinating to see how culture has changed and how my own time period and the years after are viewed through the lens of history.

Plus, I've relocated across the country before, and finding new people to care about isn't all that hard if you have any social graces, and people we love and care about die or move away all throughout life. You just lose a few more at once when it's your time to go.

If I wake up old and disabled or demented... (2)

ackthpt (218170) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611203)

I'm not seeing an advantage here. If I wake up in an age with a lobster, cyclops, rastafarian bureaucrat and obnoxious robot, I might be inclined to exclaim, "Excellent news everyone!"

Re:If I wake up old and disabled or demented... (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611467)

I'm not seeing an advantage here. If I wake up in an age with a lobster, cyclops, rastafarian bureaucrat and obnoxious robot, I might be inclined to exclaim, "Excellent news everyone!"

More likely you'll wake up to find you're now Holly, as that process is a tad cheaper than full biological revival.

Re:If I wake up old and disabled or demented... (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611495)

Oh, and I forgot to mention the other part: if they did revive your body, you'd likely wake up to find your body only had weeks to live, as your it would be defenseless against the "modern" microorganisms it would encounter.

First thought (2)

dtmos (447842) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611227)

Ted Williams [wikipedia.org] would roll over in his freezer if he read this. At least, his head would. . . .

There's only one path to immortality... (1, Flamebait)

SSonnentag (203358) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611241)

The Bible outlines the one and only path to immortality. All other attempts are futile.

Re:There's only one path to immortality... (4, Funny)

deadweight (681827) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611295)

I know people that read the Bible and are now dead. Do they get a refund or what?

Re:There's only one path to immortality... (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611525)

I know people that read the Bible and are now dead. Do they get a refund or what?

Probably not; the people who wrote the Bible were long dead before it was compiled. I think the refund would be void based on "breach of warranty" anyway.

Re:There's only one path to immortality... (2)

deadweight (681827) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611589)

Besides for THAT, AFAIK the Bible does not really say you won't die, it just shows a way to a better zip code after the fact. Just like a time-share sales deal, you're going to have to sit throug the whole presentation to get in ;)

Re:There's only one path to immortality... (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611615)

I know people that read the Bible and are now dead. Do they get a refund or what?

Hey, it never said you get to keep your terrestrial flesh-sack.

Everything old is new again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611263)

I remember when the cryonics got to be a big fad during the late 80's early 90's.

Made alot of people really rich.

Cliche (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611317)

Bright idea !!!!!

Make sure they have redundant power supplies... (1)

Drewdad (1738014) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611321)

Because I don't want to wake up with freezer burn.

The only freezer... (2)

Drewdad (1738014) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611341)

...where things are spoiled before they get preserved.

BUG JACK BARRON (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611355)

it's not off topic. look it up

Useless idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611365)

What do i care once i am dead!!!!! Useless stuff...This is another shitty idea to encash people's endless greed and desire....

Permanent brain damage & unbudgeted revival co (4, Insightful)

ad454 (325846) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611379)

Permanent brain damage starts within 5 minutes of not receiving red blood cells with oxygen. So you would have to be frozen before then, and in such a way as to prevent ice crystalization from permanently damaging cells, which is not done with current cryogenic techniques. Otherwise you would lose so much of your personality, intellect, memories, and consciousness from brain damage, that even if they could regenerate all of that grey matter in the future, your brain would no longer be you, but would be someone else. (So what is the point?)

Aside from that, no matter how cheap it is to freeze someone, it's is likely going to cost a lot more to revive someone who is frozen, and regenerate their body into a functional state. How many people looking at cryogenics are budgeting for revival costs? Maybe they hope the future will be some socialist utopia, which is funny considering the global tend for wealth concentration and reduction of public services, including healthcare for the living.

Re:Permanent brain damage & unbudgeted revival (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611517)

budgeting for revival costs

You might be surprised at how much you earn when investing for 500 years.

Re:Permanent brain damage & unbudgeted revival (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611747)

You might be surprised at how likely you are to lose all your money, either through normal market forces or by your trustee's fraud, when investing for 500 years.

Re:Permanent brain damage & unbudgeted revival (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611583)

"As to prevent ice crystallization from permanently damaging cells, which is not done with current cryogenic techniques."

This is untrue. There are methods in use currently that prevent crystallization. All are poisonous, but the hope is that by the time we're able to reverse the process, we'll be able to do something to negate that. And poison's not doing any harm while you're frozen, anyway.

The 1970s called, they want their article back. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611403)

Seriously. Cryonics has been around since the dark ages (pre Unix/Moon Landing/Arpanet). Cryonics Institute almost as long.

Wake me up when they sucessfully freeze and reanimate a mammal, even a mouse.

Extraordinary claims (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611415)

Let me pull out a rhetorical stick I've been beaten with more than once: "extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof."

Show me the evidence that ressurecting a dead organism of any kind -- even a bacterium, even a plant -- will ever be possible. *Ever.*

(crickets chirp ...)

Re:Extraordinary claims (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611537)

human embryos used for in-vitro fertilization.

Re:Extraordinary claims (1, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611629)

human embryos used for in-vitro fertilization.

Kind of hard to resurrect that which is not yet alive, dink.

Re:Extraordinary claims (1)

Gavrielkay (1819320) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611867)

Did you really say that? Of course an embryo is alive. The cells may not have differentiated enough to have consciousness yet, but they are alive. The viable living cells that will lead to a pregnancy once thawed and implanted are indeed an example of successfully reviving living tissue and having it thrive.

The big distinction here is that the cells are fast frozen while still alive. If they experienced cell death (by whatever scientific definition applies) and are then frozen, chances are you'd just end up with thawed dead cells.

Re:Extraordinary claims (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611577)

Let me pull out a rhetorical stick I've been beaten with more than once: "extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof."

Show me the evidence that ressurecting a dead organism of any kind -- even a bacterium, even a plant -- will ever be possible. *Ever.*

(crickets chirp ...)

On the other hand, if the brain can be scanned, it may be possible in the future to model the body in a new container. This information could still possibly be extracted from the existing popsicle, even with cellular degeneration due to crystallization (computers of the future could trace back the degeneration to reconstruct the original state).

Re:Extraordinary claims (1)

JF_Daddy (2876761) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611611)

Show me the evidence that ressurecting a dead organism of any kind -- even a bacterium, even a plant -- will ever be possible. *Ever.*

(crickets chirp ...)

If by 'dead', you mean frozen, take a look at sperm banks. Fertilized eggs are routinely frozen as well. (Not that every sperm or fertilized egg is successfully 'thawed', but many are.)

Re:Extraordinary claims (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611789)

Since you're cryogenically frozen only after your death, "dead" in this context doesn't mean "frozen" but "your life functions terminated".

Re:Extraordinary claims (3, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611731)

How 'dead' do you want the organism to be?

Plenty of organisms can survive nontrivial periods of complete metabolic shutdown, combined with some amount of cellular damage, and rehydrate and go on without significant trouble. Tardigrades are probably the most charismatic ones (survives 10 days of unprotected exposure to spaceflight and looks like an adorable little alien bear!); but extremophilic bacteria are even tougher.

Even humans will (with odds lousy enough that you don't want to try it; but good enough that documentation is available) survive short periods of total circulatory shutdown or longer ones of inactivity in very cold water.

'Resurrection' of an organism in a more advanced state of damage (or an organism for which precise brain configuration is considered important) is likely more fundamentally problematic. Even if you had indistinguishable-from-magic nanobots and the option to rebuild atom by atom, if you don't have somebody's 'correct' neural state on file, there are any number of configurations that would work; but wouldn't be the person you are trying to revive.

bullshit (0)

zr (19885) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611417)

i call bullshit

Who says things will be better? (1)

DaveAtFraud (460127) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611421)

Or you'll like what you fine when you thaw out? Corpsicles in Sci Fi [jessesword.com]

I specifically remember reading Larry Niven's "Rammer."

Cheers,
Dave

Re:Who says things will be better? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611609)

For a similar take on the subject, Allen Steele's "A King of Infinite Space".

Disaster waiting to happend (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611423)

Of course a lawyer is hawking this as progress. So what happens when you die today? You are declared dead, your posessions are split among surviving relatives according to your will and the laws of whatever country you live it. Let's say that 100 years from now, you're revived. Now what? You're basically peniless, since your possessions are long gone. OK, so you leave a trust for yourself. Again, I can't see you surviving relatives lawyers leaving this intact. I don't believe that any government in the world would leave it alone either. Just a bad idea all around.

Re: Disaster waiting to happend (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611469)

Just Shit....

Larry Niven, World out of Time (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611489)

That book might give you an idea why cryonics might not be a good idea. Even if it works.

Sounds like vaporware... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611521)

Or, um, Iceware? Guess that depends on how cold they keep you.

Modern mummies (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611539)

If you think about it, the reasons are pretty much the same. They would probably even have used cryogenics if it was available.

Why would the future wake us up? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611549)

Scenario:: You are immortal but we have destroyed all our resources so you are trapped on a polluted resource planet with 50 billion other undying souls. Enjoy.

There are a number of things that would have to happen before the future would consider using frozen bodies for anything other than solyent green.

makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611557)

So, I have cancer, and not the kind that you get better from. I feel like I am maybe 5 years away from some sort of cure or treatment for me. Cryonics makes sense for someone like me. Unfortunately, the techniques we have now suck. I would have thought a rich billionaire would support research for something like this, but the last time I looked at research, the best they could do is revive animals after a short time.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611559)

Yes, I'd like to order a large pepperoni pizza. The name is I. C. Wiener. Please deliver to the Cryonics Institute.

modern mummies (1)

dsoodak (3022079) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611579)

If you think about it, the reasons are pretty much the same. They probably would even have used cryogenic technology (possibly with a long-half-life nuclear battery) if it was available

Re:modern mummies (1)

dsoodak (3022079) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611601)

sorry about the anonymous comment of same name...didn't realize I wasn't logged in.

It's not that hard (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611627)

I put a fly in the freezer for a week, let it unfreeze on the table at room temperature after that. After an hour or two, it flew away.

The weird thing is, a week later I received a job offer from Veridian Dynamics.

Of course. (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611677)

Who doesn't want immortality? The lifespan of the average person is fucking bullshit. It's just enough to get a taste and not enough to satisfy. Unfortunately, freezing you after you die is a problem. The damage the freezing does to you is a problem. The cost of doing the entire body is a problem. The probability of something going wrong with the storage and maintenance of patients for hundreds or thousands of years is a problem. Should everything work out, you then have to realize that when we are finally able to reach this potential, nobody will want to bother bringing you back to life (and, in fact, may legally be forbidden from doing so). The last thing people who may have nearly infinite life would want to do is bring back people who have no connection to them (because it'd be hundred of years and not just a few decades) to compete for precious resources in the face of ever-growing populations.

Re:Of course. (1)

phocutus (670853) | 1 year,8 days | (#44611785)

That's called "life" yo. Just now figuring that out?

Short film "We Will Live Again" (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,8 days | (#44611823)

Hi -

For even more on the topic, I just saw this fascinating short film about the subject at the Traverse City Film Festival:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2555152/

- Tom

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