Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Peppers Seem To Protect Against Parkinson's

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the mmm-tomacco dept.

Medicine 161

DavidHumus writes "A recent study indicates that consuming vegetables from the Solanaceae family, which includes tomatoes and peppers (as well as tobacco), decreases the risk of contracting Parkinson's disease. Earlier studies had shown that smoking tobacco seems to provide protection against the disease and the newer one seems to confirm that the key ingredient is nicotine, which is present in some vegetables like peppers."

cancel ×

161 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

ah tobacco (5, Insightful)

ThorGod (456163) | about a year and a half ago | (#43680989)

You wont get Parkinson's because you'll be dead before it could form.

(sardonic)

Re:ah tobacco (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681079)

As a black man of colossal proportions, my smelly cock will inevitably have its way with your rancid rectum. What say you?

Tobacco...right (3, Informative)

justthinkit (954982) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681235)

Anecdotal, but the only relative I have that smokes...is the only one that got Parkinson's.

Re:Tobacco...right (1)

ClintJCL (264898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681377)

Maybe his predisposition to get Parkinson's caused the desire to smoke..

Re:Tobacco...right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681457)

Maybe his predisposition to get Parkinson's caused the desire to smoke..

Maybe our predisposition to analyze the living shit out of this is basically pointless when using a killer to combat...a killer.

Then again, I shouldn't be surprised. It's not like chemo combats cancer with vitamins and nutrients...

Re:Tobacco...right (2, Interesting)

maxwell demon (590494) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682615)

Actually AFAIK it's not the nicotine in the cigarettes which kills you. It's all of the burning byproducts. Nicotine is responsible for making you addict, though.

Re:Tobacco...right (3, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682145)

Maybe his predisposition to get Parkinson's caused the desire to smoke..

Nicotine ameliorates some of the symptoms of schizophrenia, and nearly everyone with schizophrenia smokes [wikipedia.org] . So it is possible that a similar phenomenon may occur with parkinson's

Re:ah tobacco (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681367)

You wont get Parkinson's because you'll be dead before it could form.

(sardonic)

Not always. Grandpa was a heavy smoker. Lived to be nearly 80. Had Parkinson's real bad, though, so any benefits evidently didn't come through for him.

Re:ah tobacco (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682973)

"Grandpa was a heavy smoker. Lived to be nearly 80. Had Parkinson's real bad."

How the fuck did he light his cigarettes then?

Re:ah tobacco (2)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683265)

"Grandpa was a heavy smoker. Lived to be nearly 80. Had Parkinson's real bad."

How the fuck did he light his cigarettes then?

Carefully.

Re:ah tobacco (2)

ClintJCL (264898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681373)

Tobacco only kills 50% of its users, and in most cases only after age 60.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681657)

These stats are really only about Big Tobacco "tobacco." Big Tobacco takes real tobacco, leaf, stalk, root, etc, and mixes it up with chemicals and sucks out the nicotine. Then they chop it up some more into a mash, squeeze it and make a paper out of it, adding back nicotine along with 300 carcinogenic chemicals, including residual pesticides, including drugs that numb your throat and drugs that help nicotine get into your blood stream faster, all designed to make smoking more addictive. The paper is cut up to appear like tobacco cuttings, and packaged into it's final form.

What Big Tobacco sells is pure poison. Of course it kills half its users. But no one really knows if actual, real tobacco kills you... Native Americans smoked the heck out of it for centuries, and you never really hear about them dying in droves from lung or other cancer caused by smoking tobacco.

Re:ah tobacco (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681855)

Native Americans smoked the heck out of it for centuries, and you never really hear about them dying in droves from lung or other cancer caused by smoking tobacco.

Don't really hear anything about them except that we already killed them in droves.

Re:ah tobacco (3, Insightful)

Dave Emami (237460) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682085)

Native Americans smoked the heck out of it for centuries, and you never really hear about them dying in droves from lung or other cancer caused by smoking tobacco.

Given the low average life expectancy of people living that close to nature, or in pre-industrial society in general, I doubt any negative effects of tobacco would have had any statistically-significant impact. Same with genetic tendency of people from sub-Saharan Africa towards higher rates of heart disease -- the vast majority of people didn't live long enough for that to matter. Likewise with lactose tolerance -- when food is chronically scarce, the extra calories from being able to consume dairy products are much more important than the drawbacks of the accompanying increase in saturated fat consumption. It's only in the last couple centuries or so that things like heart disease, stroke, and cancer have climbed up the causes-of-death list, because people have (mostly) stopped dying of starvation, malnutrition, and water/airborne diseases.

Re:ah tobacco (2)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682693)

Low average life expectancy is usually caused by high infant mortality, so as long as they survive past childhood, they tended to live to the same ages that we live to. It's a myth that people used to die after reaching 30.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

Sique (173459) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683011)

No, they didn't. Even after correcting for an early death in childhood, people on average didn't live as long as today. Main reason are bacterial infections we routinely cure today with antibiotics, and which can be deadly if left untreated.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683029)

Yes and no. There's more people living to extreme old age these days, but we haven't really increased the maximum lifespan.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683315)

Yes and no. There's more people living to extreme old age these days, but we haven't really increased the maximum lifespan.

Sorry, we have most certainly increased the average life expectancy.

Your argument is basically "if you didn't die in childbirth, or early from malnutrition or one of numerous childhood diseases that are now eradicated or very rare, and if you didn't ever get a disease as an adult that we could now trivially treat with drugs, or die from an infection that we would nowadays just sterilise and bandage, or ever have an accident that left you unable to hunt/labour in the fields, then it was quite possible to live to 70 or more".

Well, yes. I don't think most people would argue that human beings have physically changed that much in the last few tens of thousands of years.

It was precisely the large number of now-preventable diasters that resulted in so many people dying young.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682837)

People would get sick and die (typical age would be 70-80 - assuming one survived the first four years of life). That's it. You would get sick. You wouldn't have "cancer" or "parkinsons" or "diabetes" or whatever fancy name is given nowadays, you would just very simply get sick and die.

Tobacco would be as much a killer as it is now, maybe even more so, they just didn't know it was the tobacco that killed them. The reason we have many people dying from tobacco, or too much saturated fats, or things like that is that nowadays we know that this is the cause of death.

This is also a key problem for say cancer rate detections due to power lines. People sometimes blame a new power line for more cancer deaths in their community - however you can not compare modern cancer rates with rates from say 30 years ago as detection is so much better, that we simply see more cases.

Re:ah tobacco (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681983)

You wont get Parkinson's because you'll be dead before it could form.

(sardonic)

Why am I not surprised? Tobacco is, of course, the Weed of Lucifer, and absolutely no Good could ever come from such a Satanic plant. Never. Nope. Any evidence suggesting otherwise must be summarily dismissed, with as much Snark as is possible.

Re:ah tobacco (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682653)

No one should smoke, until they retire. That way they're dead before cancer catches them.

Tabacco is prescribed in chinese medicine for a number of age related conditions.

Re:ah tobacco (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683339)

> Tabacco is prescribed in chinese medicine for a number of age related conditions

Dessicated tiger penis is prescribed in Chinese medicine for erectile dysfunction. Your point is?

Tomacco. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43680995)

Tomacco.

Re:Tomacco. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682125)

Daddy, this tastes like grandma.

Re:Tomacco. (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682905)

One of the best Simpsons episodes.

Paging Mr. Fox (3, Funny)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681001)

I know it's in bad taste, but I'd pay anything to see Michael J Fox doing a Frank's RedHot Commercial splattering sauce everywhere while having a case of the shakes.

I PUT THAT SH*T ON EVERYTHING!!!!

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (2, Funny)

dontgetshocked (1073678) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681171)

Your right, it is in very bad taste. You should be ashamed of yourself and why Slashdot awards you points is beyond me. Having a Neurological disease myself, it is very offensive. You are the kind of person who laughs at others misfortunes. Sad!

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (4, Insightful)

TomR teh Pirate (1554037) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681277)

Lighten up, Francis. I'm going in for neurosurgery in a week to fix 18 months of severe neck pain and I'm cracking jokes about it. I even asked the neurosurgeon about neck-bolts.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681327)

Having a Neurological disease myself

Lacking a sense of humour is called a neurological disease now?

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (2, Informative)

ClintJCL (264898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681383)

News flash: Jokes come at the expense of somebody|thing. Sometimes it's you.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

Sique (173459) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683025)

So the joke about the function and the operator which meet, and where the operator tells the function: off my domain of definition, or I will differentiate you! to which the function wittily replies: do it! do it! I am e^x! But then the operator thunders: And I am d/dy!

At whose expense comes this joke?

Re: Paging Mr. Fox (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683043)

The person reading it, primarily

Re: Paging Mr. Fox (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683213)

This.

Captcha: seminars (which I would need to understand the freaking joke)

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (2)

ClintJCL (264898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683347)

I said somebody/thing, not somebody. In this case, I think the main victim is humor itself. That joke gave me cancer.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (0)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683351)

News flash: Jokes come at the expense of somebody|thing. Sometimes it's you.

News flash 2: jokes are generally understood to contain something funny. Pointing at someone with a disease/disability and saying "look, he's different from me!" is not funny, it's just a pathetic way of proving your 'normality' to the conformists around you.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

ClintJCL (264898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683375)

1) The joke was more than that. 2) You don't get to decide what is funny for the general populace.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681399)

everyone is always taking offense these days. lighten up, im sure you make fun of "insert XX here" and I am sure XX is not amused by it. If people cant take a joke, the world is a very boring place.

I leave you with words of the late great Carlin

Like rape. They'll say, "you can't joke about rape. Rape's not funny."
I say, "fuck you, I think it's hilarious. How do you like that?"
I can prove to you that rape is funny. Picture Porky Pig raping Elmer Fudd.
See, hey why do you think they call him "Porky," eh? I know what you're going to say.
"Elmer was asking for it. Elmer was coming on to Porky.
Porky couldn't help himself, he got a hard- on, he got horney, he lost control, he went out of his mind."

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (0)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683369)

everyone is always taking offense these days. lighten up, im sure you make fun of "insert XX here" and I am sure XX is not amused by it. If people cant take a joke, the world is a very boring place.

Joking at the expense of people with less perceived power than you proves that you are psychologically insecure, not that you are in fact more powerful.

Also, your Carlin example has the distinction of being 100% unamusing.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1, Flamebait)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681547)

Your right, it is in very bad taste. You should be ashamed of yourself and why Slashdot awards you points is beyond me. Having a Neurological disease myself, it is very offensive. You are the kind of person who laughs at others misfortunes. Sad!

Mods got this and the GP wrong. I used up my points earlier today.

Not only is the GP insensitive, his post is absent of entertainment. It's boring as hell.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

radarskiy (2874255) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681579)

I'm sure Michael J. Fox is very ashamed of the jokes he's made about Michael J. Fox.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (4, Insightful)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681669)

I have a neurological disease and didn't think it offensive. I also didn't think it funny. You choose whether to be offended. Choose to not be offended, and you'll be a happier person.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682415)

I have a neurological disease and didn't think it offensive. I also didn't think it funny. You choose whether to be offended. Choose to not be offended, and you'll be a happier person.

that's like saying that you can choose to be a homosexual.

j fox putting sauce everywhere would be a funny advertisement tho.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (0)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682461)

As the homophobes put it, you can choose whether to act on your urges. Seems like most of them could be perfectly happy if 50% of guys were gay, so long as they never had sex with any other guys.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683223)

Many slashdot virgins act out on our urges while remaining virgins and never having sex with other people... ;)

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683163)

Neurological disease? That explains a lot, oh and the joke was sort of funny.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683397)

I have a neurological disease and didn't think it offensive. I also didn't think it funny. You choose whether to be offended. Choose to not be offended, and you'll be a happier person.

You are, of course, right.

However, I still find the whole justification that just because something's a joke no one should take it too seriously, extremely dangerous and wrong-headed.

Nazi satirical writings and cartoons of Jews were very far from being "just jokes" that everyone should be able to laugh off. Like any potential act of speech or writing, jokes have consequences.

Re:Paging Mr. Fox (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683337)

Your right, it is in very bad taste. You should be ashamed of yourself and why Slashdot awards you points is beyond me. Having a Neurological disease myself, it is very offensive. You are the kind of person who laughs at others misfortunes. Sad!

How the fuck has this been modded funny?

Whether you agree with him or not, there is absolutely no evidence he's joking.

MJF (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681019)

Wasn't Michael J. Fox a longtime smoker? Doesn't seem to have protected him.

Re:MJF (4, Funny)

M0j0_j0j0 (1250800) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681033)

Yeah, but ya know that time traveling shit did have some side effects.

Re:MJF (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682111)

Is that why he comes on here as Alex P. Keaton, blathering on about the hosts file and 64-bit Opera?

Re:MJF (1)

game kid (805301) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682217)

What would we dooooo, baby, without HOSTS...shalalalaaaaa....

How to quit smoking (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681035)

Eat lots of peppers and tomatoes.

As for ciggies protecting against Parkinson's... well... of course it does. If you die young because of lung cancer, you're never gonna get Parkinson's. Right? :)

nightshade family (4, Informative)

WGFCrafty (1062506) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681051)

&The title says peppers but it says nicotine is actually the chemical at work. There are actually a few positive effects nicotine possesses, the negative effects of smoking are mediated by the oxidation products of cigarettes.

There are actually quite a few common plants in the family with varying levels of nicotine in each part (tomatoes vs the leaves). Some, like datura (moon flower/jimsons or devils weed) contain scopalamine and atropine and are deleriants. From wiki:

The family includes Solanum (potato, tomato, eggplant), Physalis philadelphica (tomatillo), Capsicum (chili pepper, bell pepper), Petunia, Datura, (Cape gooseberry flower), Mandragora (mandrake), Nicotiana (tobacco), Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), Lycium barbarum (wolfberry), and Physalis peruviana.

Re:nightshade family (1)

ThePeices (635180) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681317)

There are actually a few positive effects nicotine possesses, the negative effects of smoking are mediated by the oxidation products of cigarettes..

Don't forget the addictive nature of nicotine.

Re:nightshade family (4, Interesting)

macraig (621737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681437)

Insects are anything but addicted to it. It' kills 'em dead. That's the entire reason the nicotine is flowing through plants' veins in the first place: it's their natural insecticide.

Now why anybody would wanna smoke insecticide.... ;-)

Re:nightshade family (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681631)

nicotenne will kill people dead as well if injected instead of smoked.

Re:nightshade family (1)

DrJimbo (594231) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681861)

Air will kill people dead [sic] as well if injected instead of inhaled.

Re:nightshade family (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681891)

Actually, that depends on the amount, and whether or not the person is a smoker. Heavy smokers create a tolerance that is actually pretty hard to overcome.

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine#Toxicology [wikipedia.org]

Re:nightshade family (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681653)

Insects are anything but addicted to it. It' kills 'em dead. That's the entire reason the nicotine is flowing through plants' veins in the first place: it's their natural insecticide.

That's why they stay in one place; they are too high to move.

Re:nightshade family (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681571)

Nicotine on its own isn't very addictive. Mix it with natural MAOIs and additives in cigarettes, and it becomes a different beast.

Re:nightshade family (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681417)

Yeah, silly English. I was coming to look if it was specifically black, white, green, tellicherry, or Szechuan. I wish people would just call "bell peppers" "sweet bell chilis", along with all the rest of the species.

Re:nightshade family (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681567)

Some countries call them "capsicums", even when speaking English.

Like most misnamed items from the New World, this was apparently Columbus' fault. He tasted a chili pepper, his crazy genocidal brain decided it tasted like peppercorn, and the rest is history.

Re:nightshade family (1)

GLMDesigns (2044134) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681877)

"Crazy, genocidal brain." Come-on now.

Re the use of the word pepper - it applied to foods that were peppery. He wasn't a botanist. He was an explorer. He used the commonly used vernacular of his time

Are you know going to call the pilgrims "crazy and genocidal" because they called maize "corn." To the 17th C English "corn" was any cereal crop.

PS. Please nobody say anything as dumb as "he was lost." He was a f**king explorer. And if you look at a globe you'll see that he got his latitude correct. He miscalculated the circumference of the earth.

Re:nightshade family (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682011)

Are you know going to call the pilgrims "crazy and genocidal" because they called maize "corn."

No, not because they caused the maize "corn," but because of all the genocide they set about carrying out to claim their stolen land. See the difference?

Re:nightshade family (1)

kamapuaa (555446) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682133)

To be fair, his genocide was accidental, infecting Native Americans with numerous diseases. He also brought back syphilis.

Re:nightshade family (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682155)

The genocide was partly accidental. FWIW, the Spanish were less genocidal than the Northern Europeans who dominated north America. You go down there, there are a lot more natives and Mestizos. They seemed to be more inclined to mix, whereas in the North they killed a lot more, except in Texas where apparently there was more mixing, or so I've been told. That might be because Texas was influenced by Mexican attitudes, or because it had more early frontier men who were more inclined to mix. California didn't see real bad massacres until it went over to the US. The Mexicans in California spread disease, were paternalistic, and destroyed the Indian way of life by bringing them into the missions; but they generally didn't massacre them as in the Mendocino War, which is one of the US's most shameful attrocities.

Re:nightshade family (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43682311)

Yes, crazy. Yes, genocidal.

When he arrived on Hispaniola in 1508, Las Casas says, "there were 60,000 people living on this island, including the Indians; so that from 1494 to 1508, over three million people had perished from war, slavery, and the mines. Who in future generations will believe this? I myself writing it as a knowledgeable eyewitness can hardly believe it...." Thus began the history, five hundred years ago, of the European invasion of the Indian settlements in the Americas. ...
Past the elementary and high schools, there are only occasional hints of something else. Samuel Eliot Morison, the Harvard historian, was the most distinguished writer on Columbus, the author of a multivolume biography, and was himself a sailor who retraced Columbus's route across the Atlantic. In his popular book Christopher Columbus, Mariner, written in 1954, he tells about the enslavement and the killing: "The cruel policy initiated by Columbus and pursued by his successors resulted in complete genocide."

That is on one page, buried halfway into the telling of a grand romance. In the book's last paragraph, Morison sums up his view of Columbus:

"He had his faults and his defects, but they were largely the defects of the qualities that made him great-his indomitable will, his superb faith in God and in his own mission as the Christ-bearer to lands beyond the seas, his stubborn persistence despite neglect, poverty and discouragement. But there was no flaw, no dark side to the most outstanding and essential of all his qualities-his seamanship."

One can lie outright about the past. Or one can omit facts which might lead to unacceptable conclusions. Morison does neither. He refuses to lie about Columbus. He does not omit the story of mass murder; indeed he describes it with the harshest word one can use: genocide.

But he does something else-he mentions the truth quickly and goes on to other things more important to him. Outright lying or quiet omission takes the risk of discovery which, when made, might arouse the reader to rebel against the writer. To state the facts, however, and then to bury them in a mass of other information is to say to the reader with a certain infectious calm: yes, mass murder took place, but it's not that important-it should weigh very little in our final judgments; it should affect very little what we do in the world.

Howard Zinn, The People’s History of the United States [google.ca]

Among the Taino people of Hispaniola, Columbus decreed a system of tribute, requiring each adult to submit a specified quantity of gold, on pain of death. But he was also fervently determined to spread the Christian faith. Christianize or exploit? Convert or enslave? The two goals were plainly antithetical. For a time, Columbus hoped to resolve the quandary by enslaving the diabolical Caribs and converting the more benign peoples. But what did conversion even mean? A priest wrote that “force and craft” were required to impose Christianity on the Indians, but there was little hope that they would observe the rites after their overlords had left.

The Less Than Heroic Christopher Columbus, IAN W. TOLL,The Less Than Heroic Christopher Columbus [nytimes.com]

I'm just taking the first things I find on Google, this shit isn't hard to find

Re:nightshade family (1)

Sique (173459) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683039)

It wasn't his fault. It was that "pepper" was a synonym for "spice" in general.

Re:nightshade family (1)

Flere Imsaho (786612) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682179)

Datura is a hell of a drug. I saw a few people tripping on it back in the day, and it's nasty stuff.

Once you know what it looks like, you notice it's grown all over the place as a decorative plant.

mmm... tomacco... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681063)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Products_produced_from_The_Simpsons#Tomacco

Been listening to Sgt. Pepper's for years (4, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681069)

So I got that goin' for me. Which is nice.

Re:Been listening to Sgt. Pepper's for years (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682817)

So I got that goin' for me. Which is nice.

That won't help. You need Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Re:Been listening to Sgt. Pepper's for years (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683387)

Lilacs and contraband [youtube.com]
I've got Santa Monica in my hand
A little.... Beatle mania when I can
And I've got two big bags of old Japan

They are not vegetables. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681089)

Tomatoes and peppers are fruit.

Re:They are not vegetables. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681151)

Scientifically, they're fruits. In more common culinary terms, they're vegetables.

Homer got it right! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681107)

http://simpsons.wikia.com/wiki/Tomacco

Fresh vegetables and fruits (0)

roman_mir (125474) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681117)

People should be just eating more fresh vegetables and fruits and fewer grains, animal fats, meats, but it seems that unless these peppers and tomatoes come in pill form, many won't have them.

I remember on some radio show a few years back there was a topic of tomatoes being useful in preventing some forms of cancer, something to the tune of: have 2 tomatoes a day, it reduces cancer risk. The show host was like: that's too much pizza I have to eat every day!

Re:Fresh vegetables and fruits (2)

chromas (1085949) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682151)

Make salsa. Stuff it in your eggs; use it as pizza sauce; put it in your sandwiches and salads; shove it up your wraps; derive chili and other stews/soups from it.

Re:Fresh vegetables and fruits (3, Funny)

dbIII (701233) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682659)

Make salsa. Stuff it in your eggs ... shove it up your wraps

That reminds me of some experiments to halt urinary incontinence by squirting chilli oil into people's bladders, on the assumption that by deadening some nerves their bladders would release urine less easily. The test subjects apparently insisted that it worked perfectly the first time and there was no need to do it again.

Re:Fresh vegetables and fruits (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682645)

I think tomatoes are very popular, as part of ketchup.

Remember "Sleeper"? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681125)

Woody Allen character in the distant future, noticing many people smoking, is told "we discovered that tobacco is good for you".

Re:Remember "Sleeper"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681301)

And saturated fat is good for you, too.

Re:Remember "Sleeper"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681951)

In moderation...

Summary is misleading (5, Informative)

sessamoid (165542) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681313)

The article does not "confirm that the key ingredient is nicotine, which is present in some vegetables like peppers."

From TFA

"Our study is the first to investigate dietary nicotine and risk of developing Parkinson's disease," said Dr. Searles Nielsen. "Similar to the many studies that indicate tobacco use might reduce risk of Parkinson's, our findings also suggest a protective effect from nicotine, or perhaps a similar but less toxic chemical in peppers and tobacco."

Tobacco and solanaceae plants have in common a lot of chemicals, including multiple alkaloids like atropine. Potato plants fall into the same family, as do all chili pepper plants. While this is an interesting study, it does NOT confirm that nicotine is the chemical in solanaceae that is protective against Parkinson's disease, even before you take into account that this was only a retrospective study.

must be mixed! (1)

AndyKron (937105) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681371)

They only work if you mix them with salt, red meat, eggs, and then lie in the full sun.

Peppers can cause treatment resistant pain. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681529)

Its called a "Nightshade Allergy".

Re:Peppers can cause treatment resistant pain. (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681687)

Not if you use ghost peppers, it goes from pain to numbness. Unless you touch your crotch without washing your hands, then it becomes the fire pits of hell.

Re:Peppers can cause treatment resistant pain. (1)

dbIII (701233) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682667)

Oddly enough I was just given a few of those, but I still plan to take your word for it instead of trying it myself.

Healthiest Salad For Long Life (0)

cstacy (534252) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681663)

The Merciless Peppers of Quetzalacatenango [wikia.com] grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum. Add sliced Tomacco [wikipedia.org] .

Lame Study (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681675)

They didn't even develop causation. Its completely useless and leads to abusing interpretation of the correlation. This study has a long way to go before this means anything and shouldn't be news.

!peppers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681683)

They're called "chilis" "pepper" refers to the unrelated family piperaceae. The reason they got called "peppers" at all is because Columbus tried to hornswoggle Europeans into thinking he had been to Asia.

Spicy food and cigars :-) (3, Funny)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | about a year and a half ago | (#43681763)

Looks like eating spicy food and smoking cigars is good for you, thanks science :-)

Re:Spicy food and cigars :-) (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682425)

Looks like eating spicy food and smoking cigars is good for you, thanks science :-)

Studies like these come out all the time. There seems to be both ill effects and beneficial effects for just about everything, including water: Drink too much of it and you'll die. "Everything in moderation," seems to work for most things. Determining at what concentration it's considered "moderation" is the tricky bit -- The difference between kills you and makes you stronger is often simply the dosage amount.

Nicotine? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681775)

In a side note, a close chemical "cousin" to nicotine is....caffeine! (reaches for a Mountain Dew Kickstart...)

Oh wait, so that food pyramid. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43681793)

Is bullshit... our diets are more complex then a few vitamins, carbohydrates, sugars, starches, and proteins huh...

Oh wait certain foods have healthy properties.

Oh wait there's no science backing this up. Oh wait some science is finally catching up to, eat your damn greens.

Oh wait, maybe all those hippies talking about chi, and good ol fashioned non industrial polluted home grown veggies and free range juicy meats might not be crazy after all...

Sad thing is only the best of us can eat the best. No big deal, taco hell is cheap as fuck and they are part of the companies that distribute the most food world wide.

I love this brave new world we livin in. /rant off =)

Aha! (3, Interesting)

JimtownKelly (634785) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682043)

This article solves a mystery that has puzzled my family for years. My dad suffered Parkinsonism for many years, and most of his life favored bland food. In the last couple years of his life, when the disease was at its peak, he had an intense craving for peppers that we all thought were signs of dementia. He would not only eat peppers but sometimes eat salsa and drink hot sauce directly from jars in the fridge. So perhaps his body was craving the nicotine in the peppers, who knows. RIP.

Ammm a little detail ... (1)

giorgist (1208992) | about a year and a half ago | (#43682951)

Smoking it delivers it to your lungs that have not evolved to deal with the complex chemicals. Your stomach on the other hand can deal with acids ... eat nicotine so you can remember more

Re:Ammm a little detail ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43683181)

Smoking it delivers it to your lungs that have not evolved to deal with the complex chemicals. Your stomach on the other hand can deal with acids ... eat nicotine so you can remember more

Such as the difference between Parkinson's and Alzheimer's?

Patches (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about a year and a half ago | (#43683381)

I wonder if low-dosage nicotine patches might have some merit for those with a familial propensity.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?