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China's Chang'E 2 Succeeds In Thrilling Asteroid Flyby

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the getting-a-good-look dept.

China 88

Zothecula writes "China has now joined the very select group of countries to have succeeded in carrying out an interplanetary probe mission. According to reports from China's official news agency Xinhua, the Chang'E 2 probe passed a mere 3.2 km (2 miles) from the near-Earth asteroid Toutatis at 8:30:09 GMT on December 13, making it the closest asteroid flyby to date ... and resulting in some remarkable photographs."

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All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314513)

This was done better and cheaper than the USA could have accomplished.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314617)

This was done better and cheaper than the USA could have accomplished.

Don't forget, this is the Chinese with a history of faking scientific discoveries and other things.

When it's independently verified, then I'll believe it.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314707)

Someone mod parent up Insightful please!

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314825)

it has been confirmed by slashdot twice, 1 [slashdot.org] and 2 [slashdot.org] .

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314871)

But has it been confirmed by Netcraft?

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315991)

Why would you want Netcraft to prove that the Chinese probe is dying?

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314875)

Well. Since the summary states this is an interplanetary probe and since I didn't RTFA to verify that is the statement that China issued. I must assume that China is lying since asteroids are not planets and thus this is not a valid interplanetary target.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (3, Informative)

tgd (2822) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314991)

This was done better and cheaper than the USA could have accomplished.

Don't forget, this is the Chinese with a history of faking scientific discoveries and other things.

When it's independently verified, then I'll believe it.

Astronomers have been tracking it for months... There's no faking going on.

What they didn't mention -- (4, Funny)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315321)

North Korea's spaceship was doing donuts around the asteroid by the time the Chinese got there. Glorious Leader's spaceship is much faster and more agile than anything the Chinese could come up with.

Re:What they didn't mention -- (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42316001)

North Korea's spaceship was doing donuts around the asteroid by the time the Chinese got there. Glorious Leader's spaceship is much faster and more agile than anything the Chinese could come up with.

And obviously, it has even better stealth capability than a Chinese teapot in the same orbit.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315515)

This was done better and cheaper than the USA could have accomplished.

Don't forget, this is the Chinese with a history of faking scientific discoveries and other things.

When it's independently verified, then I'll believe it.

Its "faked" because no one likes the fact the chinese do most everything better than everyone else and the "fakes" are usually discovered by americans who need to always prove they are the best country on the planet. Whether it be faking having proof other countries fake stuff so they can feel superior, or rolling in the military to a under forced nation which is like mike tyson in a school yard.

You just have fallen for propoganda is all and yet another mindless drone marching to someone elses drum because you cant think for yourself.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (4, Interesting)

medcalf (68293) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315751)

China is an interesting problem, and I don't just mean geopolitically. On the one hand, China indisputably has been making incredible strides on applied science and engineering in space and in military matters, as well as economic progress and progress in controlling diseases. On the other hand, they've also lied through their teeth about each of these things, and so it's very hard to trust Chinese assertions without independent verification. Thinking about how far China has come since beginning liberalization just a scant couple of decades ago, the potential is enormous, and overall likely quite positive for mankind as a whole. In order to get there, though, China's self-confidence will have to improve to allow them to admit mistakes, and to get over some of the racial tics they have. I think, too, that it's likely that somewhere in the next thirty years, the Communist Party will lose its monopoly on power. That has to happen as they transition to a relatively free market, which is a path they are already on. In essence, I see China now as basically S. Korea in the 1970s, in political and socio-economic terms. Once they get to where S. Korea was in the 1990s, it's going to be amazing to see what China can do.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (2)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315867)

Not like South Korea at all. More like an oppressive capitalist dictatorship. There is nothing Communist left except for Stalinist paranoia and control.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (4, Informative)

medcalf (68293) | about a year and a half ago | (#42316057)

South Korea in the 1970s was an oppressive capitalist dictatorship (specifically, a right-wing, military one).

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

DRJlaw (946416) | about a year and a half ago | (#42323195)

South Korea in the 1970s was an oppressive capitalist dictatorship (specifically, a right-wing, military one).

So you appear to be agreeing that China is really quite similar...

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42327617)

And that is why in the 70's the populace of South Korea migrated in doves to North Korea to get away from the oppressive dictators and flock to the worker's paradise of North Korea. In fact that is why North Korea has all that barbed wire along the border, to keep out the South Korean fleeing their oppressive government...

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315749)

Don't forget, this is the Chinese with a history of faking scientific discoveries and other things.

I'm curious what scientific discoveries the Chinese have faked. Care to elaborate and explain how such "fakes" differ from the many faked studies and doctored results that have been documented in western science (start here [wired.co.uk] for some examples)?

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42316787)

This is getting annoying. While i get that reverse engineering 'western technology' might seem a weakness in this day and age, please get some historical perspective. You are thinking about 'recent history'.

If anything, they (the Chinese and other people we often criticize) made up/discovered some of the most important principles not years, decades or centuries ago, but at least a THOUSAND years ago which we then used and/or stole for our own purposes. As a matter of fact, they most probably gave it away.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese_inventions

There would be no copied western technology if the principles they are based upon hadn't been invented by the people we so happily disregard. It is this short-term view & memory of history that is doing us in.

'They' are playing the long game.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#42331493)

You're saying that they invented a load of clever stuff as Europe was collapsing into the dark ages and then sat on their arses pretending to be dumb as shit until the last couple of decades, and this was all a cunning plan?

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about a year and a half ago | (#42317481)

When it's independently verified, then I'll believe it.

NASA released a radar image [nasa.gov] which agrees with the visuals.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42320745)

yep, this was "flyby" near potato

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (2)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315431)

This was done better and cheaper than the USA could have accomplished.

Citation needed.

Re:All hail our new Chinese overlords (0)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315873)

Sure when you can steal and copy all the technology it is easy... Also since when did the Chinese open up their launches and mission control to the international press?

double dupe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314585)

"[...] on December 13, making it the closest asteroid flyby to date ... and resulting in some remarkable photographs."

Yes, on December 13.
We've been discussing it enough by now, don't you think, samzenpus?

http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/12/15/0431204/chinese-moon-probe-flies-by-asteroid-toutatis
http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/12/16/1926226/views-of-the-asteroid-toutatis-from-earth-as-well-as-close-up

Closest? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314637)

How can 3.2km be the closest asteroid flyby when Hayabusa returned a sample from an asteroid?
http://www.space.com/9538-asteroid-dust-successfully-returned-japanese-space-probe.html
I guess I'll have to RTFA...

Re:Closest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314675)

Presumably they didn't sample the asteroid during a flyby..?

Re:Closest? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314929)

Because China is always better than Japan.

Quick test: ask any Chinese who beat Japan in WWII. The island-hopping campaign, the atom bombs, and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria had nothing to do with it. Nope, Mao Zedong all the way. Despite the fact that he fought the Japanese, like, twice during the whole war.

Re:Closest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42316515)

Because mainland Chinese are so ignorant and brainwashed it brings me to tears :(

Such a wonderful culture, ruined by the cultural revolution...

Re:Closest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42316951)

Americans are the ones who brings tears with their ignorance.

Re:Closest? (1)

tgd (2822) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315003)

How can 3.2km be the closest asteroid flyby when Hayabusa returned a sample from an asteroid?
http://www.space.com/9538-asteroid-dust-successfully-returned-japanese-space-probe.html [space.com]
I guess I'll have to RTFA...

Arguably that's a fly-to, not a fly-by.

Re:Closest? (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315201)

More than that though:

1. Fly-to
2. Fly-hi!
3. Fly-bye!

Re:Closest? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about a year and a half ago | (#42317641)

Maybe they are pointing to the impressive guidance needed to pass an object at 3.2km range and 10 km/s speed.

Re:Closest? (1)

FhnuZoag (875558) | about a year and a half ago | (#42323931)

Well, Hayabusa was a specific asteroid probe sent on a seven year mission to an asteroid in its orbit. Chang'E 2 was a lunar orbital probe launched in 2010 that was redirected from its parking orbit in April to approach Toutatis at the last minute when the asteroid happened to come close to Earth. The two are very different types of missions.

Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314655)

China's been orbiting 3.2km afar the asteroid at 10km per second, leaving a time frame of mere 320ms to correct possible errors? Would a crashing satellite have enough energy to fling it out of its orbit and make it deviate towards earth or moon? (I suck at physics... bear with me!)

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315105)

Do cowboy neil's farts have enough energy to knock the Earth out of orbit? They knock everyone out of the room!

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315425)

Thanks for the so-so reply, but I imagine that something that moves at 6.21 miles per second might develop some kinetic energy... duh!

Re:Wait, what? (1)

Thiez (1281866) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315683)

Do you have a point? Because it sounds like you're fishing (somewhat desperately) for a rather far-fetched doom-scenario just to get a chance to call China irresponsible.

Guess what, asteroids don't make any sudden movements, so there isn't any real danger of crashing into it unless you're completely incompetent, which the Chinese are not (despite many slashdotters baseless assertions to the contrary). Besides, it's a 50000000000000 kg rock, a collision with a small probe won't even make it blink.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about a year and a half ago | (#42317661)

Would a crashing satellite have enough energy to fling it out of its orbit and make it deviate towards earth or moon?

No it would be like an extra air molecule hitting a truck.

Pah (4, Funny)

polyp2000 (444682) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314679)

It just a piece of Ginger Root scaled at different sizes!

N

Re:Pah (2)

Tablizer (95088) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315933)

Hell, even our big conspiracies are now Made in China!

Artist's conception of an angry starfish (3, Insightful)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314725)

Another damned link that talks about photos, MOTHER FUCKER THEY'RE AMAZING PHOTOS!!!!, and then doesn't provide them.

It does provide an artist's conception...of the spacecraft.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314809)

Here is the link to the "amazing images" Looks like another fraud IMHO.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (1)

thereitis (2355426) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314859)

If this thrilling flyby is real, their PR department should be fired.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314915)

Its here: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/photo/2012-12/16/c_132043872_6.htm
They only linked to this in TFA, so you are right, but this time its easy to find it.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315063)

This photo is freakin' me out. http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/photo/2012-04/15/c_131527511_2.htm

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315687)

Hell, I've got one of those in my refrigerator.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314949)

Speaking of the photos, you'd think that a rag called "gizmag" would know that the usage is "cum" and not "come" as it appears in the caption. I'd give a link, but ... well, I'll let someone else search for "cum" at work.

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314983)

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/photo/2012-12/16/c_132043872_6.htm

Re:Artist's conception of an angry starfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315267)

Well there is a link to the photos in TFA, although maybe the fully spelled 'photographs' confused you.

oddness (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42314779)

This is such a rare event. China actually doing something productive and cool. I don't think I could get used to this, and somehow I doubt I will have to.

Re:oddness (3, Insightful)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year and a half ago | (#42314917)

I dare you to produce a list of things around you, cool or otherwise, that do not contain something made in China.

Re:oddness (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315033)

I have some bluebell ice cream on my desk. I've been assured that it was made here in Texas. Also, it's pretty cool (pun sadly intended).

Location of photos... WTF (2)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315015)

Ok.. so I went to the article and saw the link to the Chinese site with the pics... http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/photo/2012-12/16/c_132043872_6.htm [xinhuanet.com]

All I can say is WTF... while the picture of the asteroid is interesting. There's a dozen photo galleries below it with photos that I would NOT want to be shared with friends and family...

For example... an "Underwear Show" "Top Bikini babes..." "Contortionist..."

Time to find another site without the BS...

Re:Location of photos... WTF (1)

ygtai (1330807) | about a year and a half ago | (#42318897)

That's also what amazed me and gave me the doubt of credibility at first. However, Xinhua Net is one of China's official news agency...

Re:Location of photos... WTF (1)

_merlin (160982) | about a year and a half ago | (#42321785)

Cultural hangups. In China that's all completely harmless. Your mum would be more worried if she didn't catch you checking out photos of underwear shows.

Re:Location of photos... WTF (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about a year and a half ago | (#42325171)

I for one welcome our new lingerie clad nubile asian minx overlords

Conclusive proof of intelligent life! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315035)

Seven asteroids with exactly the same shape in different sizes in such a precise arrangement is conclusive proof of intelligent life.

How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date"? (4, Informative)

runeghost (2509522) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315089)

Chang'E's flyby of 4179 Toutatis is certainly an impressive feat. But, given that Hayabusa took samples while several meters above the surface of 25143 Itokawa, and that NEAR-Shoemaker actually landed on 433 Eros, I don't see how the term "closest" (which the article uses as well as the summary) can apply. Unless they mean "the asteroid flyby mission that took place nearest to Earth," which, while interesting, doesn't seem to be how this is being presented.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (2)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315471)

Chang'E's flyby of 4179 Toutatis is certainly an impressive feat. But, given that Hayabusa took samples while several meters above the surface of 25143 Itokawa, and that NEAR-Shoemaker actually landed on 433 Eros, I don't see how the term "closest" (which the article uses as well as the summary) can apply. Unless they mean "the asteroid flyby mission that took place nearest to Earth," which, while interesting, doesn't seem to be how this is being presented.

Some of the source articles from which Gizmag stole this story referred to this being the closest flyby of this particular asteroid. The wording was such that when I first skimmed one of them even I thought the claim was that this was the closest approach to any asteroid. When I went back and parsed the whole sentence it became much clearer - Gizmag must never have read their sources carefully.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (1)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42316141)

Well I am sure that some of the new agencies and their reporters there at Chinese mission control, such as Reuters and AP, could clear this up...oh wait....this was a Stalinist mission and closed to press. And I am sure that the only reason we are getting any information from these paranoid nut jobs is that the mission was successful.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315607)

The Chinese news release states that it was the closest for 'this' asteroid, not any asteroid.

Gizmag screwed up claiming that it was the closest for any asteroid, and slashdot echoed Gizmag's claim. More sensational that way I guess.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (1)

Bomazi (1875554) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315849)

You can't compare the two scenarios.

In a flyby the probe is moving really fast relative to the asteroid. It thus can't produce enough delta-v for a last minute avoidance maneuver. The trajectory is determined well before the encounter. How close you can safely get depends on how accurately you can predict the asteroid path. A few kilometers at close approach with a reasonably low risk of collision is pretty good.

If you enter orbit first the situation is completely different. You can gradually lower the orbit and get as close as you want. You can also take all the time you need to accurately map the gravity field. And if there is a risk a collision the gravity is so low that you can quickly raise the orbit. The main difficulty in a low gravity environment is landing without bouncing back into space.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (1)

Bomazi (1875554) | about a year and a half ago | (#42316059)

I realize I should have just said that a flyby and an orbit are two different things, and that the article is therefore correct. Explaining why it is easier to get close to an object when you are orbiting around it than when you are flying past it is irrelevant.

P.S.
I hope that the reason /. doesn't have an edit button is because Bezos patented it. Seriously guys, it is 2012.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42316487)

True. But the mission to orbit and/or land on the surface of an asteroid is MUCH more technically challenging than a close flyby, so I'll still score the point for Hayabusa and NEAR. It's the closest (the only?) flyby of Toutatis, but anything beyond that is exaggeration if we're talking about technical accomplishment for probes visiting the vicinity of asteroids. It's a nice accomplishment, but a ways to go before it is comparable.

Re:How is this "the closest asteroid flyby to date (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42322223)

Is it just me or are the Chinese actually the first to take a COLOR image of an asteroid.
Seems like most of the other spacecrafts opted to use black/white imaging. Probably necessitated by the amount of available illumination (there are no flash guns big enough to cover several kilometers).

The Chinese satellite is also on some multi-mission profile.
If you want to get real close/land to an asteroid, it would likely need to be a specific mission with-respect-to trajectory, fuel management, avionics/control, etc.

Orbital adjustment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42315313)

So now that this little gravity tractor maneuver is done, who is Toutatis going to come down on next time around?

Re:Orbital adjustment (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#42331695)

A small village in Gaul that's holding out against the might of Rome.

Dupe (3, Informative)

hackertourist (2202674) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315323)

one [slashdot.org]

two [slashdot.org]

in the other news... (3, Insightful)

hackingbear (988354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315409)

Slashdot editors' memory is getting really short. This is essentially the same story already post just two days ago! And nothing new in this one.

Using stolen technology (0)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315791)

Before you anoint our Chinese overlords, be aware that most of this technology was stolen from NASA/JPL. There is a reason China was (basically) kicked out of NASA

Re:Using stolen technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42317043)

Such arguments can be extended to a broader historical context: US stole space technology from defeated Germany by the end of WWII. And Apollo program was led by Mr Brown, a principal scientist of Germany's rocket technology. Does it make us less proud about achievements of Apollo program? No. For example, if two countries are coming up with the same shape of super-aerodynamic plane does it mean that someone stole something from another? No. It means that laws of physics are the same everywhere. Given enough efforts, things can be done. And China at this point puts more effort in space technologies like nobody else. Lack of effort and resources is the main reason why US currently is not capable to return to the Moon any time soon...

Re:Using stolen technology (0)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42317173)

So then you agree that China stole the technology for this mission. It is indeed pretty obvious. Your masters in the Chinese Water Army will not be happy. But the mission is impressive in that it is not easy to steal this information and clone the technology. But before we get too excited, let's see the Chinese open these missions to the world press....HA!

Re:Using stolen technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42318721)

I am just arguing the point that "the mission succeeded because China stole technology from NASA". It just makes no sense. Everyone is stealing technological secrets from others and there are no saints or devils. Stealing (or obtaining information) about technology does not constitute any value if there is no effort or project behind how to use it or what to do with it. For the most part, technology achievements are coming through sharing the knowledge but not hiding it. Are you saying that China stole from NASA the whole complex of material things (rockets, launch pad, navigation systems, etc...) to accomplish the mission?

Re:Using stolen technology (1)

cusco (717999) | about a year and a half ago | (#42320063)

kicked out of NASA

Considering your other ignorant and racist comments in the thread I guess I shouldn't be surprised that you're unaware NASA isn't a multi-national organization. That first 'N' in the name? It stands for 'National'. China was never a 'member' of NASA that could be kicked out, no other country ever was.

Re:Using stolen technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42322207)

Maybe he's referring to the International Space Station?

The Space Shuttle did have some international involvement ( in addition to scientists immigrating to work at Nasa ).

The European Space Agency developed the SpaceLab and SpaceHab for use in the Shuttle. Then there's the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS), a.k.a. Canadarm ( a version of which is also found on the International Space Station). This is why Canadian and European Astronauts have been members of various Shuttle Crews over the years. No Chinese members as far as I'm aware of.

Re:Using stolen technology (1)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year and a half ago | (#42327729)

No. I was referring to: "Congress Bans Scientific Collaboration with China, Cites High Espionage Risks" http://www.forbes.com/sites/williampentland/2011/05/07/congress-bans-scientific-collaboration-with-china-cites-high-espionage-risks/ [forbes.com] If China continues to be a closed society that prohibits access by the free press to its space ventures (and everything else), why the heck should we give them free access to NASA technology?

Re:Using stolen technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42337511)

Good to know the Russians are no longer officially stealing our stuffs.

Thrilling Asteroid Flyby; Engrish Funny (1)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315913)

"China has now joined the select group of countries have been successful interplanetary exploration missions. According to China's official news agency, Xinhua News Agency reported, Chang'e II detector by only 3.2 km (2 miles) from near Toutatisat 8:30:09 on December 13 GMT Earth asteroid, it is the closest asteroid flying over ... as well as the resulting photos. "

A pock of lips (2)

Tablizer (95088) | about a year and a half ago | (#42315919)

on December 13, making it the closest asteroid flyby to date

A record to be shattered on the 21st...
   

It's a space dong! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42316279)

Glad we got that out of the way.

They were probably aiming for it (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about a year and a half ago | (#42317691)

And when they find the probe, there's gonna be a *made in china* sticker on it :p

gravitational push (1)

MrKaos (858439) | about a year and a half ago | (#42323615)

It was just a little gravitational push that the probe exerted on this asteroid. I wonder how much closer to the earth it will be when it comes around in 145 years time?

Re:gravitational push (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42335035)

Less than the size of your dick.

Re:gravitational push (1)

MrKaos (858439) | about a year and a half ago | (#42347125)

Less than the size of your dick.

So you're thinking of my dick near your asteroid, hmmmm, yes, that is quite a huge mass to move.

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