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Climate Change Could Drive Coffee To Extinction By 2080

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the right-here-in-ponca-city dept.

Earth 345

Hugh Pickens writes "Coffee is the world's favorite beverage and the second-most traded commodity after oil. Now Nick Collins reports that rising global temperatures and subtle changes in seasonal conditions could make 99.7 per cent of Arabica-growing areas unsuitable for the plant before the end of the century and in some areas as soon as 2020. Even if the beans do not disappear completely from the wild, climate change is highly likely to impact yields. The taste of coffee, a beverage of choice among Slashdot readers, will change in future decades. 'The worst case scenario, as drawn from our analyses, is that wild Arabica could be extinct by 2080,' says Justin Moat. 'This should alert decision makers to the fragility of the species.'" Read more, below. Hugh Pickens continues: "Arabica is one of only two species of bean used to make coffee and is by far the most popular, accounting for 70 per cent of the global market, including almost all fresh coffee sold in high street chains and supermarkets in the US and most of Europe. A different bean known as Robusta is used in freeze-dried coffee and is commonly drunk in Greece and Turkey, but Robusta's high caffeine content makes it much less pleasant to most palates. In some areas, such as the Boma Plateau in South Sudan, the demise could come as early as 2020, based on the low flowering rate and poor health of current crops. The researchers used field study and 'museum' data (including herbarium specimens) to run bioclimatic models for wild Arabica coffee, in order to deduce the actual (recorded) and predicted geographical distribution for the species. 'Arabica can only exist in a very specific pace with a very specific number of other variables,' says Aaron Davis, head of coffee research at the Royal Botanic Gardens. 'It is mainly temperature but also the relationship between temperature and seasonality – the average temperature during the wet season for example.'"

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Why coffee? Why not beer? (-1, Troll)

PoopManners (2764379) | about 2 years ago | (#41941657)

I don't get why people drink coffee. It's not even particularly good. Cocoa would be much better tasting. The best drink is beer. Why don't you drink more beer? Pizza and beer are the best food and drinks in the world.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941699)

I don't get why people drink coffee....The best drink is beer. Why don't you drink more beer?

I don't get why people drink beer, the best drink is coffee. Why don't you drink more coffee? :p

Each to their own mate. I love coffee, I hate beer.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941761)

I don't get why people drink coffee....The best drink is beer. Why don't you drink more beer?

I don't get why people drink beer, the best drink is coffee. Why don't you drink more coffee? :p

Each to their own mate. I love coffee, I hate beer.

Neither - give me a nice refreshing Coke. Better tasting and caffeinated.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

seven of five (578993) | about 2 years ago | (#41941767)

Amen, brother. Not everyone has the "I love coffee taste" gene.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1, Troll)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41941821)

Coke makes you a fat and disgusting lardass and will destroy your teeth

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941859)

This is Slashdot. Mountain Dew, Cheetos, and some vaguely meat-like substance are the only allowed consumables, except on extended gaming or coding sessions where Taco Bell, pizza, and Red Bull are allowed.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942005)

Any late night coding session deserves some decent Armagnac, interleaved with gallons of Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee.
And spanish tapas are much more satisfying than american junk food...
Do not confuse the issue: (avaiability of food late at night) with the solution (in some countries only crappy junk is avaiable)...

Moreover junk food as almost as man pattents destroying their acceptability as smartphones.... and is much less fun...

And it brings havoc on Steampunk ambient...

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 2 years ago | (#41941935)

Coke makes you a fat and disgusting lardass and will destroy your teeth

Yeah so?

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

Goaway (82658) | about 2 years ago | (#41941839)

Each to their own mate.

I agree: Everyone should drink mate tea, not this coffee or beer nonsense.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942095)

Yerba Mate will put you into Liver Failure if you drink too much

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (3, Funny)

MrHanky (141717) | about 2 years ago | (#41941915)

That's why you post as Anonymous Coward, whereas he is whoring for karma with a first post about beer.

// posted while having a coffee break from sanitising bottles for my homebrewed beer.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

Reformed Lurker (1677950) | about 2 years ago | (#41941703)

At least for morning coffee drinkers, It probably has something to do with the caffeine...

And once you start, it easily becomes a habit.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (4, Informative)

SirJorgelOfBorgel (897488) | about 2 years ago | (#41941745)

If you don't drink coffee, you feel the same in the morning as somebody who does drink coffee - after they've had their morning cup.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942107)

but not the first 10 or so mornings after you start to drink coffee in the morning....

best part about coffee? If you abstain for a few months you get that kick in the rear when you start drinking it again.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942311)

best part about coffee? If you abstain for a few months you get that kick in the rear when you start drinking it again.

Just like heroin. The first time you try it after abstaining you will get a big surprise in the rear!

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

darjen (879890) | about 2 years ago | (#41942305)

I used to not drink coffee that much in the morning. Now I have two young kids who are constantly up at at all hours of the night. Since then I have been about three cups after getting to work. Can't get enough of it.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941769)

I hate coffee. I hate beer.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (3, Funny)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about 2 years ago | (#41941779)

Because getting shit faced at work is generally frowned upon. That and if my beer intake matched my coffee intake I'd probably be fat and have all sorts of health problems.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941781)

Coffee gets you high. It's a mild high, but it is there.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941871)

I find both coffee and beer not to be very tasty. Tea and wine are much better.

Re:Why coffee? Why not beer? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941965)

Because spreading FUD on a Saturday morning to beer drinkers is a waste of time - they're still passed out.

So... It now is... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941675)

"Wake up and smell the coffee, before it is too late"?

We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (3, Insightful)

csumpi (2258986) | about 2 years ago | (#41941685)

Oh, wait...

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (2)

Znork (31774) | about 2 years ago | (#41941805)

If TFA is accurate, "Climate change is happening so fast that caffeine farms would have to move their plantations 50m every decade to survive, he added.", this would be another case of OMG the HORROR.

Of course, calling them caffeine farms may be an indication that 50m might mean something other than 50 meters and that someone hasn't had their morning coffee. In that case one would hope more care is taken with any units used in actual calculations underlying the cause for alarm.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (3, Funny)

fatphil (181876) | about 2 years ago | (#41941917)

Oh noes! By the time they're nearly extinct, 6 decades down the line, they'll have to migrate 300m! That means that their neighbours will of course be in the perfect position for growing arabica. Even if FTA meant 'miles', heaven forfend, at most this means production would move to a neighbouring country.

This is a total non-story.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942125)

I think the article writer meant MILES and since he is too stupid to hold down any other meaningful job, he is of course on the science beat of an on-line publication.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942235)

If TFA is accurate, "Climate change is happening so fast that caffeine farms would have to move their plantations 50m every decade to survive, he added.", this would be another case of OMG the HORROR.

Of course, calling them caffeine farms may be an indication that 50m might mean something other than 50 meters and that someone hasn't had their morning coffee. In that case one would hope more care is taken with any units used in actual calculations underlying the cause for alarm.

Most likely ment 50m in ALTITUDE.

I didn't find any reference to 50m in the original research article but it mentioned altitude in meters on multiple occasions.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (2, Informative)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 2 years ago | (#41942389)

How does your brain even come up with something like that?

My friend has some coffee growing on a small hill, but only on the top 50m is it cool enough to grow. 10 years and she won't be selling coffee.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (2)

durrr (1316311) | about 2 years ago | (#41941807)

We hit peak intelligence by 2000. We'll drive it to extinction by the 2030s if these predictions don't grow any more sensible.

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (1)

s0litaire (1205168) | about 2 years ago | (#41941899)

Don't worry!

We'll all be gone anyway by December 22nd....

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (1)

CrazyDuke (529195) | about 2 years ago | (#41942083)

I will buy your house now for $100 and take delivery on December 23rd...

Re:We'll run out of oil by the year 2000. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941813)

Dude, do you think energy companies would be trying to squeeze gas out of rocks i.e. fracking if oil wasn't running out? Face it, oil has peaked. Since 2000 how have gas prices been? Any wars in oil rich regions? Hmmm, yeah, seems like this oil thing could be on the way out...

in 2080... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941687)

... without coffee, we will die

Already rare (1)

bogjobber (880402) | about 2 years ago | (#41941691)

Wild arabica is already quite rare.

Wild arabica was always rare (4, Interesting)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | about 2 years ago | (#41942147)

"Wild arabica is already quite rare."

Wild arabica was always rare. :)

This is why it took until the last centuries until we had a global production of coffee even if it has been known for millennia.

Will the climate change make it dissappear? Probably not, but at least make it rare enough to preclude further harvesting.

well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941723)

hopefully god will design a better coffee plant next time!

That's terrible! (2, Insightful)

danbuter (2019760) | about 2 years ago | (#41941741)

Thank God I'll be dead before then. Without coffee, life wouldn't be worth living.

Re:That's terrible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942023)

And the next generations won't know what they are missing. Nothing to worry about.

Re:That's terrible! (2)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 2 years ago | (#41942169)

Since this article is sensationalist BS, you will still have coffee. Beer isn't going anyplace either. Coffee in the morning, alcohol at night: the yin and yang of existence. Or as they said on Star Trek: "I just got to have a little something to jump-start the morning and a little something else to shut down the night."

Finally plausible (5, Funny)

Darri (948351) | about 2 years ago | (#41941747)

At last there's a plausible cause for a zombie apocalypse.

Re:Finally plausible (2)

ByteSlicer (735276) | about 2 years ago | (#41942255)

Obligatory webcomic reference [optipess.com] .

Unlikely (5, Insightful)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#41941749)

Even when the climate changes, there will still be some areas suited to the growing of coffee, and since it is popular, people will try to grow it in those locations.
Also there will be incentive to genetically modify it so it can grow in more places.

Of course there may not be enough to go around, but it won't be gone altogether.

OTOH species that live in really cold climates (like polar bears) will go extinct because there won't be any really cold places left.
(And polar bears are not as useful to man as coffee)

Re:Unlikely (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941903)

seen northern european wine makers starting to plant different type wine that needs hotter climate, betting on climate catching up to the needs of the wine when
it is ready for production

Re:Unlikely (5, Funny)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 2 years ago | (#41941953)

(And polar bears are not as useful to man as coffee)

Actually they have a very important use. They eat the people who count polar bears and tell us their population is declining.

Re:Unlikely (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 years ago | (#41942377)

They eat the people who count polar bears and tell us their population is declining.

Well, at least they get to eat cheap fresh meat grown on organic fodder, lucky bastards.

Re:Unlikely (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#41942035)

Even when the climate changes, there will still be some areas suited to the growing of coffee

That's why Juan Valdez is buying up property in Greenland.

Re:Unlikely (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942145)

My first thought was "seed bank those suckers". Then when the climate shift causes wile Arabica to go extinct, introduce it to new habitats.

Re:Unlikely (1)

vvaduva (859950) | about 2 years ago | (#41942339)

Exactly...this has been happening for million of years on this planet. When one area becomes unsuitable, another area becomes perfect. Adapt or die...

Coffea Arabica? (2)

aglider (2435074) | about 2 years ago | (#41941753)

We only drink coffea robusta, from Brasil!

Re:Coffea Arabica? (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942155)

nasty nasty nasty plant.

Maybe this is a case where GMO can help.....make Arabica as robust as Robusta or lower the caffeine level of Robusta so it tastes better.

Its not a beverage its a drug. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941775)

An efficient delivery for self medication, but socially and culturally acceptable. Synthesis plus orange juice would give a nicer tasting alternative and dialing in the dosage would be easier.

More over-the-top scare mongering (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941783)

Jesus H. Fucking Christ, and we wonder why way too many people pooh-pooh climate change claims.

"Global" temperature has not changed in 15 years. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941785)

NOAA and other reports have already stated that global temperature has no changed in 15+ years of monitoring. There are some warming trends in the northern hemisphere, but there are cooling trends in the southern hemisphere. Ice levels at the north pole are shrinking, but Antarctic ice levels are setting new records highs. There has been zero net change globally.

There will be plenty to go around. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941789)

Most of the people live in coastal areas. Apparently global warming is going to melt all the glaciers and flood them all out and drown them any day now.

Everybody freeze! (1)

xdor (1218206) | about 2 years ago | (#41941797)

"Give us your money or no more Starbucks!"

Call me when Diet Coke is endangered (4, Funny)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about 2 years ago | (#41941845)

then I'll start bicycling to work.

Re:Call me when Diet Coke is endangered (1)

guises (2423402) | about 2 years ago | (#41942051)

As long as that's caffeine free diet coke, you're probably okay.

Yeah, that doesn't work for me. (1)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about 2 years ago | (#41942071)

Where's that stupid bike now? Doesn't anyone ever clean this stinkin garage??

Caffeine-free, lol. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942239)

The way it works is drinks are chemically decaffeinated, they are not "made that way."

That's 70 years away. (0, Troll)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about 2 years ago | (#41941861)

By then the magic carbon pixie believers will be back round to global cooling again, and climate change will be making it so cold we'll have to grow potatoes in greenhouses.

No more coffee? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941863)

And nothing of value will be lost.

One of the sillier FUD articles (5, Insightful)

argStyopa (232550) | about 2 years ago | (#41941867)

Look at a map of the world.
It doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that as agricultural regions shift poleward even slightly, the amount of arable land favorable to crop-growing will greatly increase.

Moreover, I recall from the 1970s concerns that the breadbasket areas of the US were going to be 'exhausted' by the intensive farming (which hasn't happened, but let's go with it)...warming of the climate, shifting optimal growing regions northward in the US will essentially 'open' virgin lands barely farmed for more intensive processes like multiple crops per year. One would suspect that as some particular, marginal soil fades from viability to grow a specific species of coffee, others will be discovered.

To suggest it's going to be "extinct" is just FUD like claiming redheads will be extinct....something so obviously tragic that everyone will be "inspired to action" without really thinking about it.

Re:One of the sillier FUD articles (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942021)

While I applaud you for not reading the article, as is tradition here, it hurts your argument. The big problem here is that wild (!) coffee won't be around anymore which is necessary for the long-term survival of farmed coffee. Coffee grows within an incredibly narrow band around the equator so it's quite the special case as far as crops go. We won't just "discover" new species of coffee that we haven't yet, I'm not sure where this argument came from. Just because of some misguided alarmist past reporting you are ignoring something that might have merit - that's not how science works.

Re:One of the sillier FUD articles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942091)

The 'action' you speak of has already begun. Just like every other commodiy traded, well heeled speculators will drive prices up with wild tales of fear and the banksters will amass more wealth. Viva Gramm, Leach & Bliley!

Re:One of the sillier FUD articles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942225)

To suggest it's going to be "extinct" is just FUD like claiming redheads will be extinct....something so obviously tragic that everyone will be "inspired to action" without really thinking about it.

Whew, thanks for saving me there! For a second I almost considered recycling!

Requisite Dilbert cartoon (2)

cinghiale (2269602) | about 2 years ago | (#41941875)

Re:Requisite Dilbert cartoon (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942103)

Disgruntled employee did this at a tech firm where I worked. His office was across from the break room and he would fill the regular pots with decaf and vice versa. If finally stopped when one 50+ employee was taken to the hospital with heart palpitations after downing two cups of what he thought was decaf late in the afternoon.

On the other hand, people's behavior in the early morning without the usual caffeine crutch was hilarious. Donuts at a meeting without caffeinated coffee resulted in mass catatonia.

Most Popular? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#41941881)

Most cheap is more likely.

Re:Most Popular? (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942171)

huh? the other coffee species is Robusta and it is a lower quality and tastes nasty.

there are no other species.

Solution: technological progress (4, Insightful)

nomad-9 (1423689) | about 2 years ago | (#41941883)

About disappearing stuff, like oil, coffee, etc. Necessity is the mother of invention, and the necessity to have something in place of what is poised to disappear, will drive new technological breakthroughs to meet market need.

By 2080, we'll probably have the technology to mass-produce artificial coffee, as no serious entrepreneur will ignore the potential for profit with the millions of caffeine-starved coffee drinkers looking for a substitute beverage.

Of course, before that, the increasing rarity of coffee will drive prices high, natural coffee will become a luxury, and some will make big bucks.

As for other things still found in the wild right now, natural coffee will be a thing of the past. The following generations will have no notion of it. Eating & drinking entirely artificially-produced products will be the definition of normality, Sad but true. As for coffee lovers like myself, there's a bright side: most of us will be dead by 2080.

Dark Ages (1, Interesting)

rsilvergun (571051) | about 2 years ago | (#41942261)

Thousand years of no progress. Those of us who were paying attention to human nature a are a little worried. For the most part the rich and powerful kinda like technology at the moment. But then I'm here in the USA and we've managed to make 'progressive' a bad word. At the risk of getting into politics, conservatives worry me. A lot. Most of them are either poor and terrified to lose what little they have or really really rich and can't imagine it getting any better.

Plus, A lot of the really rich ones aren't trying to create new wealth, they're trying to monopolize the old wealth. When Bain Capital shuts down a profitable factory in the States you'd think somebody would come along, say hey, I can make money doing that! and reopen it. They don't. That's because the guys at the top all just sorta agree not to step on each other's toes (aka compete)...

Re:Solution: technological progress (1)

ByteSlicer (735276) | about 2 years ago | (#41942287)

As for coffee lovers like myself, there's a bright side: most of us will be dead by 2080.

I'm going to upload my brain to the cloud, you insensitive clod!

Yet another stupid global warming prediction (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941911)

Seriously, how many of these lame predictions do people come up with? Now they're at least getting smarter and putting the timeline out 60 years so we'll all be dead before we can call their BS.

I sincerely hope... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941921)

...that in the mean time, the climate changes again.

No coffee? Brawndo! (3, Funny)

TimHunter (174406) | about 2 years ago | (#41941949)

But we know what plants crave. Brawndo. It's got electrolytes.'

'...Okay - what are electrolytes? Do you know?'

'Yeah. It's what they use to make Brawndo.'

'But why do they use them in Bawndo? What do they do?'

'They're part of what plants crave.'

'But why do plants crave them?'

'Because plants crave Brawndo, and Brawndo has electrolytes.'

Not that I don't believe in Climate change... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941957)

It's just that I thin rather than let the world's largest drug addiction go extinct, people will probably plant it elsewhere. How knows, maybe I'm wrong and alarmist news articles are always right.

Darwin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941975)

Coffee beans have been around long before men walked the earth, a product of millions of years of evolution. I highly doubt the species will go extinct. They have survived ice ages and climate cycles many times over..

The point of this climate babbeling is? (2)

Sla$hPot (1189603) | about 2 years ago | (#41941979)

Yes the climate is changing. It always did and always will. What an apocalypse.
Will it make the coffee disappear in the next hundred years?
Of course it won't. Farmers will move their stock around the hill or mountain to adapt to the changes, what ever it takes.
Who tf cares about the wild coffee anyways? If it can't survive it's just not wild enough.
Maybe someone should pick up a few samples in case the climate goes back to "normal" again.

Greenhouse Bananas in Winter (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941991)

If weed can be grown indoors, supposedly even in Antartica, then cofee could be grown in a covered area of the yard / roof ... whatever. Let alone a reformed warehouse - or something. Detroit is available, and relatively unoccupied, it would seem?

Errr.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41941999)

By 2080 we will 3D print coffee, or grow it in private orbital farms serviced by (3D printed) space elevators. Duh? Like, technology and computers and stuff? Hello? We will always find a solution.

This is BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942013)

Really ? Extinct ? What a BS. Coffee production will just move to higher latitudes. It is no different from Roman Empire times when wine was produced in Britain when previous global warming was going on.

JAM

Just fanning the flames (2)

LeopardMechanic (2732551) | about 2 years ago | (#41942025)

Did it really never occur to this guy that as temperate regions become to warm, colder regions will be temperate? I’m just as concerned about global warming as the next guy but such obvious attempts to panic the people into buying Prius’s only hurts the cause. Just like the deceitful, discredited tools at the CRU – they shoot themselves in the foot and we take the ricochet. Keep it real or keep it shut.

Coffee prices fall 30% in last year (3, Interesting)

BobK65 (2541842) | about 2 years ago | (#41942045)

Just more expensive FUD produced by modelers. Wholesale prices have fallen by 30% in the last year and Brazilian coffee growers expect a record coffee crop this year. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/coffee-prices-fall-but-not-at-starbucks-2012-11-08 [marketwatch.com]

Re:Coffee prices fall 30% in last year (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942129)

I agree - this is marketing/activism motivated (not to say we shouldn't leave a smaller footprint at the least cost available)
Curious if anyone knows of a weather model that was even close to accurate for a 70 years out prediction ?

If its true that a large earth quake can alter the rotational axis of the earth and modify the climate - i'm pretty sure humans can not prevent earth quakes...so a 70 year out prediction, i have to sell that.

Re:Coffee prices fall 30% in last year (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942323)

Weather? we are talking about CLIMATE....that is different than weather.

Re:Coffee prices fall 30% in last year (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942187)

And Gas was 79 cents per gallon in 1996....

Re:Coffee prices fall 30% in last year (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942317)

Natural gas price has dropped dramatically because production is way up, on private lands. Lucky for us they have failed to block this so far.
Gasoline price would drop too if they would stop blocking oil production and oil refinery construction.

Forget about it (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#41942049)

You can have my Hummer when you wrest it from my cold dead hands.

Anyway, this is why God made FourLoko.

MWP (0)

ghostdoc (1235612) | about 2 years ago | (#41942097)

It was warmer during the Medieval Warm Period. Coffee didn't die out. I call bullshit.

Re:MWP (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41942337)

and we have already surpassed the warmth of the MWP....at the beginning of last decade.

Luckly (1)

Exitar (809068) | about 2 years ago | (#41942127)

I will be dead long before.

excuse for ... (1)

3seas (184403) | about 2 years ago | (#41942133)

... raising the price of coffee.

Here's a link to the paper (5, Insightful)

pnot (96038) | about 2 years ago | (#41942161)

Here's the paper. [plosone.org] What's the fucking point in open access if nobody bothers linking or reading the research?

Five links in the summary, NOT ONE OF THEM TO THE FUCKING PAPER THAT REPORTED THE RESEARCH. Naturally the Telegraph article doesn't link to it either. Apologies for shouting, but this really fucks me off. Yeah, I know, if I hit the fourth link in the summary, there's another link three screens down that page which would take me to the article. Whoopee.

Would it have killed The Telegraph, Hugh Pickens, or Timothy to do us this small courtesy? As it is, the Telegraph sensationalizes the abstract, Slashdot sensationalizes the inaccurate Telegraph article, and 1000 idiots then argue about completely irrelevant points suggested by free-association from the title, because they couldn't be arsed to read the summary.

Henceforth I shall be tagging these stories "wheresthefuckingpaper".

Sorry I'm so grumpy folks, haven't had my coffee yet :-). I'm off to read the paper now -- why not join me?

Yet another religious nutcase (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942257)

Anybody who says global warming (oops, it's climate change now, right?) is "science, not religion" needs a good hard kick in their worldview. And all the while they'll be yelling, "I'm not biased! This is SCIENCE and LOGIC!"

good riddance? (0)

v1 (525388) | about 2 years ago | (#41942275)

Coffee and cotton are both very destructive to soil, requiring large amount of fertilizer and other treatment to put back all the nutrients that those two crops remove every season.

Lol (1)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | about 2 years ago | (#41942295)

2081: Grad student enrollment drops to dangerously low levels.

Glob^WClimate Cha^H^H^HDisruption (1)

Anynomous Coward (841063) | about 2 years ago | (#41942341)

Is there anything it cannot cause ?

We could use tea as a replacement (4, Interesting)

prefec2 (875483) | about 2 years ago | (#41942361)

The IT industry, teachers, researchers and may more depend on their morning dose of coffee. When that is gone, this will be the end of the Western civilization. However, we could adapt to tea. Tea has a wider range of flavors than coffee so it is not necessary to invent all these untasteful coffee mixtures, which only exist to give people who have not to make many decisions every day, a chance to do so, by answering 5 questions to get a coffee. However, we still have subway and can make seven decisions until we get to the food.

However, we most likely do not need any coffee by 2080, because our industry will be crashed for good, as they do not want to adapt to the necessities of reality. Then we will all sit at home without jobs. I do not need coffee to cry in my pillow. It is contra-productive to drink coffee and stay in bed. So, no big deal when there is no coffee anymore.

BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41942387)

Leaving in Brazil, near millions of square miles of coffee trees, with relatives directly in the business, all I can say is: total BS. My cousin's farm, for example, has its production rising year after year and since a long time.

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