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CERN Announcing New LHC Results July 4th

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the building-block dept.

Science 226

An anonymous reader writes "The Higgs boson is regarded as the key to understanding the universe. Physicists say its job is to give the particles that make up atoms their mass. Without this mass, these particles would zip though the cosmos at the speed of light, unable to bind together to form the atoms that make up everything in the universe, from planets to people. From the article: 'Five leading theoretical physicists have been invited to the event on Wednesday - sparking speculation that the particle has been discovered. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are expected to say they are 99.99 per cent certain it has been found - which is known as 'four sigma' level. Peter Higgs, the Edinburgh University emeritus professor of physics that the particle is named after, is among those who have been called to the press conference in Switzerland."

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This would have been first post. (4, Funny)

daveashcroft (321122) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516935)

...but it doesn't carry any weight anymore.

Re:This would have been first post. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517259)

4th of July, hmmm.....
we should expect a big kaboom

Re:This would have been first post. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517809)

In the case you didn't know, CERN is located between Switzerland and France. Switzerland's national day is August 1st and France's national day is July 14th.

Re:This would have been first post. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517561)

... its [The Higgs boson's] job is to give the particles that make up atoms their mass.
No, it isn't
Without this mass, these particles would zip though the cosmos at the speed of light,
No, they wouldn't
unable to bind together to form the atoms that make up everything in the universe, from planets to people.
Yes, they would

It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40516951)

....Gordon Freeman's invited.

Seriously though, they'll find another one won't they, so can I theorise that the Higgs Boson is made up of, say Anonymous Coward Bosons? I've always wanted to be famous...

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (1, Funny)

JackCroww (733340) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516979)

If they're going to have cake, Chell better be invited too...

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517105)

Pssst...the cake is a lie!!

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (3, Funny)

xQuarkDS9x (646166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516995)

If Mr. Freeman's invited better have some crowbars and other weapons ready in case alien creatures and head crabs jump out of the machinery! :)

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517277)

If Mr. Freeman's invited better have some crowbars and other weapons ready in case alien creatures and head crabs jump out of the machinery! :)

Sorry, Gorden's in the Anomalous Materials Lab that day. But his half brother Morgan can make it.

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (2)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517585)

But his half brother Morgan can make it.

Ah. The right man in the wrong place can make all the difference in the world. And we all know that the right man for the search for the God particle is someone who's acquainted with the role.

It's lame news anyway. (3, Funny)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517093)

I was expecting an exciting ending to the search, but it just ended up being a big deus ex machina.

Re:It's lame news anyway. (0)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517193)

Free JC Denton!

Re:It's lame news anyway. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517693)

Wow, a three-way pun. You don't see that very often.

Re:It's lame news anyway. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518215)

We all know CERN - if they thought they had something they wouldn't postpone the announcement. This is just one of their "see, people are still interested enough that you should fund us!" announcements.

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517419)

....Gordon Freeman's invited.

Seriously though, they'll find another one won't they, so can I theorise that the Higgs Boson is made up of, say Anonymous Coward Bosons? I've always wanted to be famous...

No, No. ACs are made of bogons [retrologic.com] .

Re:It isn't a sub atomic particle party until... (1)

NoSleepDemon (1521253) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518341)

I do hope they'll have a very safe day. Or their may be some regrets; a few survivors of their personal holocaust who can't wait to meet the men responsible for the total annihilation of their race.

when these genius people are 100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40516957)

when they can say with 100% call me , i want to lose a few pounds...you can have the higgs in those particles back....

Re:when these genius people are 100% (5, Insightful)

schroedingers_hat (2449186) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517033)

The thing about smart people is that they're never 100% sure of anything. They think too much for that.

Bigfoot (0, Offtopic)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517595)

...This decay would leave behind a ‘footprint’ ...

They've been finding Bigfoot foot prints for decades.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517069)

For 100% certainty you need religion. This is science, no guarantees other than "Best available knowledge."

Re:when these genius people are 100% (4, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517157)

For 100% certainty you need religion

Or math, the queen of all sciences (ducks from flames)

Interesting how its the soft sciences and the archaeologists and bio majors who get all the heat from the fundies, but the math majors get no heat despite being arrogant WRT possession of the truth in general and their insistence that the value of PI is an unbiblical irrational number instead of gods written truth of exactly three.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (5, Insightful)

meekg (30651) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517387)

Heh, that's because the Math type have never ever proved (or even claimed) anything that is related to the real world.... In this respect, they are like fiction writers, 100% sure about what's happening in their world :)

Re:when these genius people are 100% (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517647)

Same could be said about Climatologists.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (2)

evanbd (210358) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517671)

For 100% certainty you need religion

Or math, the queen of all sciences (ducks from flames)

Really? I don't think 100% certainty means what you think it does. Have you ever made a mistake proving a theorem? Has a peer-reviewed published theorem ever later been found to have a mistake? Is it even remotely possible that it will happen in the future? If so, you need to assign a level of certainty to any given theorem: a probability that it has a mistake. As it gets used more a scrutinized more, that probability declines dramatically, but it can't reach zero. Zero and one are not probabilities [lesswrong.com] . There's a big difference between 0.99999999, or any other finite number of nines, and infinite nines. For the same reasons that infinity is not a real number, zero and one are not probabilities or certainties.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (1)

Afecks (899057) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517935)

Zero and one are not probabilities.

What the hell? Yes, they are! What is the probability that a perfect coin will land either heads or tails? The probability is 1. What is the probablity that it will land neither? The probability is 0. It's pretty simple.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (3, Informative)

liquidweaver (1988660) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518019)

Wrong. Read the article s/he linked, it's pretty interesting.
You and the quarter might be nuked before it hits the ground. Ridiculously small probabilites still subtract from the probability you stated of 1.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518105)

What the hell? Yes, they are! What is the probability that a perfect coin will land either heads or tails? The probability is 1. What is the probablity that it will land neither? The probability is 0. It's pretty simple.

That thought works just fine until someone doing a coin flilp study shows that coin can land on the ground in such a perfect way that it stands up on it's edge....

Then they post their results in a peer reviewed journal showing your theory of 100% Heads/Tails coinflip probability is flawed. And then you are ridiculed.

Then another study tries to recreate the upright coin phenomenon and their results indicate that they were unable to reproduce and then those results are posted in a peer reviewed journal. Thus begins a massive debate trying to prove the existence of the upright coin phenomenon so both sides feel validated. And then there is a massive debate as both sides are saying "our experiment is valid despite conflicting results."

And then the news people get a hold of it and sensationalize the story to the point that the original thought behind the experiments are lost completely and use it to attract eyeballs to sell ads. "could coinflips be tearing our universe apart? Professor Hubert Farnsworth with more at 11. And something about an alternate universe box"

Re:when these genius people are 100% (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518287)

What is the probability that a perfect coin will land either heads or tails? The probability is 1. What is the probability that it will land neither? The probability is 0. It's pretty simple.

Not necessarily [dilbert.com]

Re:when these genius people are 100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517767)

Math is really the *language* of all sciences...

Re:when these genius people are 100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518067)

Even math has facts that are unprovable and therefore you cannot be 100% to be correct.

Re:when these genius people are 100% (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517631)

Unless you are a Climatologist. Wait, they DO have religion!

Fundamental particle masses only (4, Insightful)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517071)

when they can say with 100% call me

You can never be 100% certain in science only so certain that no reasonable person would doubt it.

i want to lose a few pounds...you can have the higgs in those particles back....

Firstly pounds measure weight, not mass, so it is the Earth's gravitational field that causes your weight. Go visit inter-galactic space any you'll have no appreciable weight (low Earth orbit will have very little effect on your weight though - it's apparent, not true, weightlessness).

Secondly the Higgs causes the fundamental particles to have mass e..g electron, quarks, W/Z bosons etc. The vast majority of your mass comes from the protons and neutrons in the atomic nuclei which make up your body. This mass is almost entirely to do with the binding energy between the quarks and almost nothing to do with the Higgs. In fact, while the quark masses are hard to measure, the best estimate is that less than 0.1% of a proton or neutron mass comes from the quark masses i.e. from the Higgs.

Re:Fundamental particle masses only (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517379)

"pounds measure weight"

I realize this is a cute 'correction' to establish your superiority, but it's wrong. The avoirdupois pound is defined in terms of the kilogram. cf. second page of http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP447/app5.pdf

Re:Fundamental particle masses only (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517567)

Thank you for that. Dude needed a dose of anti-smug hard and fast. That type of pedantry annoys the shit out of me. It's like the douchebags in /k/ who get super butt-hurt when someone calls a firearm magazine a "clip". Easiest place to troll ever. Just ask them if they know where you can find clips for your gun and post a picture of an M1 Garand.

Re:Fundamental particle masses only (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518141)

Please stop assuming everybody knows what /k/ means.
If you are going to refer to a specific sub-community of a site on another site, please put the actual site too.
4chan/k/ makes much more sense than just /k/. There could be many sites with a /k/ directory or community label related to guns.
This is almost the unintentional point of the person they corrected, there are too many different definitions of A Pound (currency, letter, weight and mass are some that come to mind)

But yes, the madness over magazine vs clips is hilariously bad on there.

Re:Fundamental particle masses only (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517415)

when they can say with 100% call me

You can never be 100% certain in science only so certain that no reasonable person would doubt it.

So in essence, scientific percentiles either officially recognize and cater to unreasonable people, or .01% is merely the official designator for Murphy, of Murphy's Law fame. Then again, maybe it's something far more obvious, like a lawyers advice...

Re:Fundamental particle masses only (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517643)

Go visit inter-galactic space any you'll have no appreciable weight (low Earth orbit will have very little effect on your weight though - it's apparent, not true, weightlessness).

Gee, here I thought the whole 'equivalence principle' of General Relativity was pretty solidly established. Take that, Einstein!

Heavy! (4, Funny)

ruiner13 (527499) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516963)

Marty McFly: Whoa. This is heavy.
Dr. Emmett Brown: There's that word again. "Heavy." Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the Earth's gravitational pull?

The real question is... (4, Funny)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516965)

Does it have round corners?

Risky experiment (4, Funny)

PTBarnum (233319) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516975)

If we prove that the God Particle exists, will it vanish in a puff of logic?

Re:Risky experiment (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517177)

If we prove that the God Particle exists, will it vanish in a puff of logic?

Apple already got a patent on the God Particle years ago and are now just waiting for someone to actually discover it so they can sue them into oblivion.

Re:Risky experiment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517237)

No.

*Goddamn* Particle, not God (4, Informative)

advid.net (595837) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517343)

If we prove that the God Particle exists,[...]

Do you mean the Goddamn Particle ? [wikipedia.org]

Re:Risky experiment (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517627)

We'll forget why we were searching for the Higgs-Boson particle, and we'll have to build a planet-sized supercollider to figure it out.

Re:Risky experiment (1)

laejoh (648921) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517735)

Beware of the next zebra crossing!

Re:Risky experiment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518195)

Only if naming conventions were universal.

Instead of God Particule, I'm calling it D3-111.LOLCAT .

Who is this Higgs... (5, Funny)

rcasha2 (1157863) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516985)

...and why is everyone trying to get a peek at her bosom? :)

Re:Who is this Higgs... (4, Funny)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517121)

...and why is everyone trying to get a peek at her bosom? :)

Wrong end. You're thinking of mesons, specifically one made out of two "top" quarks. They follow the anti-heisenberg uncertainty principle where the better you can see their position, perhaps because they're unconfined, then the better you can see the effects on them of momentum and vibration/oscillation. I like high energy/high mass mesons like that, but Higgs is not a meson so it's all rather irrelevant.

Higgs particle, speaking to husband: "Honey, does this Large Hadron Collider make my butt look fat?" They would have been more likely to get a peek if they told her it was the "Petite Hadron Collider", or if they told her there was a shoe sale there.

Who says it has a "job" ? (1)

The Living Fractal (162153) | more than 2 years ago | (#40516989)

Saying a particle has a "job" sounds an awful lot like intended purpose, which means design... So, which physicists says this again?

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517041)

Saying a particle has a "job"

We have jobs and we post on /.

The Higgs particle has a job, therefore it must post on /.

So fess up, which of you guys is the Higgs particle? There's probably a tubgirl joke in here somewheres

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517369)

donno who is Higgs, and ain't gonna ask about the one that's the big black hole. There's one with Klingon Dark matter

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518147)

ain't gonna ask about the one that's the big black hole

Thats the goatse particle. Agreed, best left unobserved. Its metastable and decays emitting Santorum particles, which are toxic little things also best left unobserved.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (2)

jihiggs (1611261) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517745)

its me :D yes, higgs is my real last name.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (4, Insightful)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517097)

Lots of physicists talk like that, it's not a religious statement it's a common was to express ideas. Similar thing in IT, people talk about programs wanting/thinking this or that but nobody actually believes the code "wants" or "thinks" anything.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (2)

the gnat (153162) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517807)

Lots of physicists talk like that, it's not a religious statement it's a common was to express ideas.

Biologists can be even worse sometimes - they'll make casual reference to evolution "designing" a particular adaptation. The urge to anthropomorphize natural processes is apparently very strong, even among people who are trained to look for rational and non-supernatural explanations. But I have to admit I wince every time I read something like that.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518369)

It's not just the urge to anthromorphise, it's that there are a lack of useful words to describe it otherwise. You can avoid anthropomorphised words, but the result is usually longer and other scientists (the intended audience) understand just fine.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517219)

All the ones that don't bother dumbing down their language for idiots.

Re:Who says it has a "job" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517947)

Saying a particle has a "job" sounds an awful lot like intended purpose, which means design...

Awesome! After thousands of years, someone has finally proved the existence of god. Allahu Akbar!

but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40516993)

Isn't that saying "Hey we found giant footprints in the forest, there must be a Sasquatch here!"

Re:but.. (2)

sick197666 (974586) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517043)

More like, "hey we found these fossils and foot prints and droppings and DNA in a dead, mummified mosquito, this must mean there's dinosaurs! but since no human was alive back then, we can only say that with 99.999% certainty"

Or, "there must be some force that is keeping us on this planet, let's call it gravity!! we can see it act upon matter and we can drop things, but we can't see gravity itself, so we have to call it a theory."

sigmas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517013)

99.99% ?
Is this the correct interpretation?

http://understandinguncertainty.org/why-it%E2%80%99s-important-be-pedantic-about-sigmas-and-commas

Let's get this one out of the way (5, Funny)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517031)

Yo mamma's so fat, CERN used her to find the Higgs-Boson with four-sigma certainty.

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (5, Funny)

paiute (550198) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517135)

Yo mamma so stupid, she thought the Higgs Boson would be found in the 149-206 GeV/c2 mass range.

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517331)

Yo mamma so stupid, she forgot to calculate the rate of Beta events with a standard dilepton invariant mass at a subleading order in the hybrid expansion when she was reducing the perturbative uncertainty in the determination of Vub from semileptonic Beta decays.

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517633)

Yo mamma so stupid, she forgot to calculate the rate of Beta events with a standard dilepton invariant mass at a subleading order in the hybrid expansion when she was reducing the perturbative uncertainty in the determination of Vub from semileptonic Beta decays.

Ooo... Scorch!

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (4, Funny)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517691)

Yo mamma so stupid, she ... uhh scored ... umm very low on an ... uhh IQ test.

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (1)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517971)

Ouch... My head!

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (1)

liquidweaver (1988660) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518041)

You forgot the calculation of the lunar wayneshaft when subleading the uncertainty. Day one shit, bro.

Re:Let's get this one out of the way (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517729)

Alright, one more: Yo mamma's so fat, when she walks to the fridge, she violates causality.

"one in a a trillion" event (5, Informative)

peter303 (12292) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517039)

During a run they record billions of collisions and terabytes a day. Even so that is just a tiny fraction of so-called "interesting collisions"; most routine data goes unrecorded. Over the months they have recorded trillions of collisions, each which represents the state of several thousand detectors. Then they search for Higgs decay candidates off-line. There are several potential decay patterns, so the search may be done multiple times. Last year's "hint" of the Higgs was 3-5 anomalous events at a likely energy at two colliders. They'd like at least a dozen, for 4 to 5 standard deviations above the noise before they call it a new particle. This is searching for one significant event on average out of each trillion recorded.

Re:"one in a a trillion" event (3, Interesting)

jovius (974690) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517257)

I wonder how many and what particles have been released by the high energy collisions happening in the universe since the big bang... Could there exist a significant field of some exotic particles just because of random head on collisions of cosmic rays in space?

Re:"one in a a trillion" event (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517569)

Almost certainly.

This is one of the arguments that had to be deployed against some bozos who warned against starting up the LHC on the grounds that it might create a subminiature black hole.

We already see cosmic rays at higher energies than the LHC can reach. We just can't study their effects at will. However, it's clear that they either haven't created any black holes, or any such black holes are too small to accrete any nearby matter, and have fallen to the center of the Earth where they don't hurt anything.

Re:"one in a a trillion" event (4, Funny)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517649)

... and have fallen to the center of the Earth where they don't hurt anything.

Fallen? And what do you thing happens when they get there with some velocity?

Such black holes almost certainly exist, not only in the Earth but in all other large bodies as well. But they aren't "fallen" in the center, but rather orbiting the body inside of it, possibly eating a few atoms on each orbit. In any case I wouldn't call that "harmless" but rather "mostly harmless". I wouldn't mind one passing through my fingernails, but I might be upset if it ate away at a bit of my brain.

Maybe this explains memory loss... Scientists!

Re:"one in a a trillion" event (5, Informative)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517963)

you have to understand how small the event horizon is on something like this. The chances of it hitting ANY atom in your brain is so low that it's more likely that the planet would get hit by a full sized black hole than one of these tiny ones. Not only can they pass through matter and not hit atoms, they can pass through atoms and not any of its constituent particles.

Re:"one in a a trillion" event (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518203)

Just a query, why couldn't "that" be the dark matter everyone's been theorizing about? trillions^2 of sub-microscopic black holes that individually don't do squat but together act as a field?

just a thought
-too lazy to login.

Interesting Date Choice (1, Funny)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517115)

They're going to have a display of the excitation [wikipedia.org] of the Higgs field above its ground state on a day when the U.S. will hold displays of excitation above its ground states across the country [wikipedia.org] . Perhaps in the future the day will be known as Higgsdependence Day?

Re:Interesting Date Choice (2, Funny)

Antipater (2053064) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517443)

Well, yeah. It's the particle that gives things mass. It's only fitting that they announce it during the celebration of the fattest nation on Earth.

Re:Interesting Date Choice (-1, Flamebait)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517571)

Fuck you.

Re:Interesting Date Choice (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517857)

U mad bro ?

Re:Interesting Date Choice (0)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517877)

I'm not mad and you're not my bro. You're just an AC.

Re:Interesting Date Choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518111)

Definitely mad. Boo-hoo.
Waambulance is on the way.
Straight to diet clinic.

Re:Interesting Date Choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517967)

Geez! Can't you tell a pick up line when you see one?

Pre-announcement announcement (1)

slasho81 (455509) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517191)

So you don't know what the announcement is, but you're speculating anyway instead of waiting a couple of days. What is this, CNN? Enough with this. I want news for nerds and stuff that matters, not circlejerking 24/7!

Already found him... (1)

Infiniti2000 (1720222) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517201)

Found him aboard the Frigate HMS Rigging [thespoof.co.uk] .

So long and thanks for all the fish. (1)

BetaDays (2355424) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517221)

So they think they found the answer but now they need to find the question. Didn't we go through this before?

Alternatives to Higgs Boson? (2)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517329)

Are there any alternative theories to higgs boson, what's the status of them?

Beyond the Higgs Boson? (5, Interesting)

CMYKjunkie (1594319) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517543)

Since I am too lazy to RTFA and since some people here are surely smart in this field, can you answer this: is there a particle BEYOND the Higgs that will be looked for next? That is to say, "we" always think we have found the smallest particle/farthest object/oldest artifact/etc. but then we later realize there is something smaller/farther/older/heavier/etc. Can we expect that to happen here as well?

Re:Beyond the Higgs Boson? (1)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517703)

My guess is that the Universe is infinite in size, both small and large. When you reach limits beyond what we can detect, most physicists refer to it as - another dimension.

Re:Beyond the Higgs Boson? (4, Funny)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517801)

nothing else. This is the last thing we need to discover then we're done and can get on with life.

Re:Beyond the Higgs Boson? (0)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518197)

Now that the most brilliant people on this planet have found what was just waiting there to be found, they can focus on helping the rest of us build actual stuff with it.

obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40517551)

"may the force be with you, young skywalker"

in other news: still freaking looking for that ellusive neutrino thing, really.

Time travel (1)

Crasoose (1621969) | more than 2 years ago | (#40517979)

So they are finally going to announcer their plans on building a time machine to take over the world?

tastey (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518057)

Would the higgs taste better with ketchup or mustard?

"We have Discovered the Higgs and it is American". (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518187)

It's big, fat, and "born" on July 4th. ;)

THE DIET SOLUTION (-1, Offtopic)

madelyndanford (2674749) | more than 2 years ago | (#40518199)

THE DIET SOLUTION Stop Dieting...Start Eating...and Start Living 3 Principles 1. Know the exact foods that cause accelerated fat burning in your body 2. Know the particular foods that are preventing fat burning 3. Put the right foods together in a certain way to create the FAT BURNING EFFECT Don’t Worry, this is NOT * Another crash diet * Another crazy diet scam * Another sales pitch for weight loss pills * Another starvation diet BUT this is REAL information you can use RIGHT NOW!! http://ow.ly/bJN9o [ow.ly]

So all that money spent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40518335)

To confirm a expected results. What else can this multi-billion dollar toy be used for?

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