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Chrome Users Are Best With Numbers, IE Users Worst

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the reopening-a-can-of-worms dept.

Chrome 203

New submitter dr_blurb writes "After reading about last year's hoax report 'Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and Browser Usage' I realized I was in fact already running a real live experiment measuring number skills: a site were you can solve Calcudoku number puzzles. I analyzed two years' worth of data, consisting of over 1 million solved puzzles. This included puzzles solved 'against the clock,' of three different sizes. For each size, Chrome users were the fastest solvers, Firefox users came second, and IE users were the slowest. The number of abandoned puzzles (started but never finished) was also significantly higher for IE users. Analysis shows that the differences are statistically significant: in other words, they did not happen by chance. I put up more details and some graphs, and also wrote a paper about it (PDF)."

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203 comments

Erect penis (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234083)

means frosty piss!!!!

Re:Erect penis (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234377)

Actually, an erect penis is caused by an increase in blood -- and thus heat. Additionally, your urethra carries both semen and urine. While erect, the prostate shuts down the urine pathway and enables to ejaculatory ducts. So an erect penis does not mean piss, frosty or otherwise.

Re:Erect penis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234455)

AC: 0, AC: 1.

Your move, AC!

Re:Erect penis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234837)

just wait til you get older and we'll see if yoo are right.

Chrome users also have bigger dicks! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234097)

It's true!

Re:Chrome users also have bigger dicks! (0)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234279)

(To date, no empirical study has validated this claim.)

Re:Chrome users also have bigger dicks! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234439)

I suppose we are to draw the conclusion that, since bigger dicks correlate with better math skills, that math ability resides in the penis.
Which helps explain why so few women study math...

Re:Chrome users also have bigger dicks! (0)

GuldKalle (1065310) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234935)

Let me guess. You run a penis-enlargement website, and of the users who enter the site, there is an overweight of IE users who actually buy your product?

Wrong conclusions (5, Funny)

lucm (889690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234109)

> The number of abandoned puzzles (started but never finished) was also significantly higher for IE users

As usual, Microsoft products users show more common sense: they are the ones that figure out quickly that the puzzles are a waste of time!

Re:Wrong conclusions (0, Troll)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234137)

> The number of abandoned puzzles (started but never finished) was also significantly higher for IE users

As usual, Microsoft products users show more common sense: they are the ones that figure out quickly that the puzzles are a waste of time!

I'd have to point out that they are also the slowest to realize that using the default browser that came with their computer is a waste of time.

Re:Wrong conclusions (4, Insightful)

Barbara, not Barbie (721478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234217)

Or that they're wasting time at work, on a computer that they don't have admin rights to, so no installing extra browsers. Or they're kids using their parents computer. Or they now have a "good enough" browser so they don't care any more.

Re:Wrong conclusions (3, Interesting)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234223)

Then to avoid that contradiction, I propose a new hypothesis: IE users are the most likely to have something better to do than sit around all day solving puzzles. I think this really more suggests that Chrome users are the most bored.

IQ correlates with motivation (4, Funny)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234239)

http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/iq-and-motivation/ [theness.com]

So what the guy is really saying is that Chrome users are obsessive compulsives and I.E. users are normal.

Re:IQ correlates with motivation (2)

Mistlefoot (636417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234839)

People at work on locked down computers used IE and kept getting "distracted" and going back to work. Sometimes they got busy enough to not finish the puzzle.
I might play Sudoku at work on a break and get distracted, never coming back (on IE). I play the same game at home on Chrome and quickly finish as my focus is there.

Statistically, that makes me "stupid" at work and "smart" at home. Don't let my boss find out!

Re:Wrong conclusions (5, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234507)

> The number of abandoned puzzles (started but never finished) was also significantly higher for IE users

As usual, Microsoft products users show more common sense: they are the ones that figure out quickly that the puzzles are a waste of time!

Interesting conclusion. The more likely conclusion is that IE is likely to crash before a puzzle can be completed.

Re:Wrong conclusions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234613)

aha! where are the mod points when you need them?

Re:Wrong conclusions (0)

djlowe (41723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234707)

The more likely conclusion is that IE is likely to crash before a puzzle can be completed.

So, care to back that up with anything resembling facts? Or were you just being snarky?

I don't use IE myself, but I really dislike prejudice stated as fact.

Regards,

dj

Re:Wrong conclusions (4, Interesting)

marcello_dl (667940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234847)

Prejudice: An adverse judgment or opinion formed beforehand or without knowledge or examination of the facts.

Facts, or better, google hits:
ie.crashes -> 27800000 results
chrome.crashes -> 35000000 results
ff.crashes -> 4.740.000 firefox.crashes ->1.810.000

So, according to Google itself, IE IS crashy, Chrome IS crashier.

Re:Wrong conclusions (1)

rykin (836525) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234875)

Interesting. Could this be because Google tends to favor results that link to google products? I ask this because I've been using Chrome at home for a while now and have never experienced a single crash, yet I still use IE at work and it tends to have issues/crash frequently enough for me to notice (it is not the latest IE though).

In my experience (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39235003)

IE is far more stable than Firefox. Now that is a little skewed, since FF is my normal browser. However FF does piss me off a fair bit by blowing up. When FF start to have problems with some content, I fire up IE and it handles everything no troubles. Of course this is all anecdotal, but then I've seen no evidence of IE being super crashy at work (we have some users who like it).

I think it is more MS haters wanting IE to be bad. They are worried IE might end up being a good browser and so hate on it.

Re:Wrong conclusions (1)

exploder (196936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234625)

Their browser crashed before they could finish the puzzle.

Re:Wrong conclusions (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234813)

I use FireFox and I just went to the puzzle page.

You click the highlighted square and the first thing that happens is an immovable pop-up covers most of the puzzle.

I left it unfinished.

I'd rather have HIV than use any Google product (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234113)

People who use Chome and Droid basically cede their lives to the Google mothership.

Re:I'd rather have HIV than use any Google product (2)

bhagwad (1426855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234305)

I'd like to see you actually act on your claims :)

Re:I'd rather have HIV than use any Google product (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234387)

So, you're still stuck with Altavista, old pal? ;)

Re:I'd rather have HIV than use any Google product (2)

lucm (889690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234429)

So, you're still stuck with Altavista, old pal? ;)

Until altavista has proven to be reliable, I'll keep using Excite.

Re:I'd rather have HIV than use any Google product (3)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234473)

Webcrawler forever!

Quitters (1)

petteyg359 (1847514) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234115)

Firefox users were the most persistent. Palin obviously doesn't use Firefox.

Where (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234119)

Has an H. (Posted with Opera on Linux; draw your own conclusions.)

Could happen by chance (5, Informative)

dwhitaker (1500855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234125)

Statistical significance just means something is unlikely to occur by random chance. Said another way, it means there is evidence that it didn't happen by random chance, but not definitive proof. (This couching of conclusions is a mainstay of statistics.) Moreover, statistical significance doesn't necessarily translate to practical significance, but I didn't RTFA to find out if that was being claimed.

Re:Could happen by chance (1)

dr_blurb (676176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234345)

You're absolutely right, I should have written: "in other words, they were not likely to have happened by chance", or something similar. (the chance of it happening by chance was less than 5%, which for many papers is enough, and people still play the lottery :-)

Re:Could happen by chance (0)

MatthiasF (1853064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234403)

It's a sample of 609 users, on an ugly site playing a game only obsessive compulsive personalities bother to play and should probably be playing on a better site not run by a weirdo. That's pretty much all you need to know to put this in the "Google fanatic FUD" category.

Re:Could happen by chance (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234577)

Your argument is primarily based off of emotion instead of reason with a clear bias against Google. That's pretty much all you need to know to put this in the "Microsoft knee-jerk reaction FUD" category.

Is this just a measure of browser performance? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234133)

The users clearly aren't the only variable affecting the time it takes to solve these puzzles, of course. Part of the time difference may be due to the performance of the browsers themselves, and perhaps even due to the performance of the operating systems and computer systems these browsers are running on.

Take Chrome, for instance. Anyone who has used it will know that it's a much faster browser than Firefox or IE. In some cases, a page will take several seconds to load in Firefox, while the same page in Chrome will be nearly instantaneous, all other factors held constant.

After the game is started, do the Firefox and IE users sit there waiting for their browsers to respond, while the Chrome users are already solving the puzzles? If so, then the duration isn't necessarily a measure of the users' intellect. Rather, it's a measure of how much time they spend waiting for their browser to perform its work.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (4, Informative)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234263)

Yeah, my first thought was that maybe his site causes IE to crash sometimes, which would look like an abandoned game.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (3, Interesting)

dr_blurb (676176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234571)

Possibly, but my guess is that I would have had complaints from people.

Also note that this was data over two years, and I'm only using it from people who've successfully completed at least 10 timed puzzles of each size.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234871)

Fair enough. That certainly reduces the likelihood of my theory.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (1)

RobbieThe1st (1977364) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234295)

To be honest, it really depends on the page - for me, with a slow internet connection(1.5mbps), FF loads it faster than chrome... if it's /not/ HTTPS. If it's encrypted, Chrome loads it faster, especially if the site's under massive load(Like Ebay when the last HP Firesale happened)
This is on Linux, with a 3.2ghz quad-core, 4GB-of-ram hulk of a system, so it's not system-performance dependant or being starved for ram.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234523)

I notice variations in performance between win32 and Unix counterparts too. FF is slow as hell on my old laptop in Fedora. It runs much better under Windows 7. Part of me wonders if the Linux version was using the intel compiler? I have not run it recently but that was the case with FF 3.6 and 4.0. Only Chrome was usable in that operating system.

IE 9 seems to perform best on newer systems that can take advantage of GPU acceleration which Chrome is now catching up to in that area. All the major browsers today are good and IE is not that crappy browser it once was if you use Windows 7.

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234601)

HP Firesale

That would be a great name for a SAN solution or something. I had to think quite hard to get what that it actually was something else. ;)

Re:Is this just a measure of browser performance? (1)

dr_blurb (676176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234325)

The clock is started once the page is fully loaded. The page itself is _very_ light on CPU, so any browser on a Pentium 4 or up should work just as well.

Inadequacy (5, Insightful)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234147)

What does this seemingly never ending quest by people to formally define and declare who is best or smartest using various proxy measurements say about the people pursuing it?

Are they afraid they aren't smart enough and are looking for some kind of reassurance?

Maybe they want to make all the "not smart" people wear some kind of button. More likely, they just want to crow and be admired by other "smart" people.

Many "smart" people would be end up standing up in their own shit because they don't understand plumbing. Many "dumb" people end up running the company and making gazillions of dollars. "Smart" is what you do with your brains, not your brain itself.

Some people need to get a life.

Re:Inadequacy (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234277)

Of all the inappropriate places to post this :)

FWIW, I agree with the sentiment completely....

This is basically just a rehash of a good part of what Phil Greenspun blogged on years ago... who oddly would only be respected here based on personality cult factors alone.

Re:Inadequacy (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234557)

Cool blog. Thanks for the tip!

Re:Inadequacy (1, Interesting)

friedmud (512466) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234351)

Competition is a basic human need... the want to compete and come out on top is intrinsic in all of us. We want to come out on top of everything... including being associated with a group that comes out on top of another group.

This competition is one of the reasons pure communism can never work. Despite what people say they don't really want everything to be "equal"... what they mean by that is that they don't want others to have more than them (ie they want _more_ than others! ;-)

In the absence of competition you generate bored, unhappy people.... that will eventually tear down their own society...

Re:Inadequacy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234663)

Conflict is what you mean. Conflict ideally ends in a resolution where you come out on top; competition is a family-friendly way to describe it. You imply that human on human conflict is a necessity, I contend there is plenty of real conflict in the realm of human vs nature or human vs science or human vs medicine or human vs machine that would serve our species better to approach.

In the circles I deal with, competition exists as a superficial joke. Cooperation is what actually gets things done, while the conflict makes it popular enough for people to care about.

Re:Inadequacy (3, Insightful)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234849)

Despite what people say they don't really want everything to be "equal"..
People who are below average or at least who perform below average absolutely want everything to be equal. It's the pesky above average people who want to be rewarded based on their skills and/or performance.

Yes! Enough pussyfooting! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234415)

WE MUST MEET IN SINGLE COMBAT!

(This is just to defeat the slashdot anti-intellectual spam filter.)

Re:Yes! Enough pussyfooting! (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234513)

So... Now that you've gotten past the span filter, what do you have to say?

Re:Yes! Enough pussyfooting! (1)

MLease (652529) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234715)

Aw, damn it; he must have said something smart that made the spam filter pay attention to him again!

Re:Inadequacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234423)

Obviously, a post that cheers up the bottom 99% slashdotters will gather more mod points than one that cheers up the top 1%. You sir are very smart.

Re:Inadequacy (2)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234483)

Oh the irony!

Numerical intelligence (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234153)

Hardly "numerical" intelligence. The sudokus don't involve any properties of the numbers, no arithmetic, nothing. All that is relevant is that the symbols are different, and the fact that you've chosen to use "numerical" symbols is neither here nor there. So rather, I'd suggest that this analysis shows a comparison of "logical" intelligence.

Re:Numerical intelligence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234339)

Didn't bother to ever read the summary, huh? Calcudoku, not sudoku. Go ahead and click that link up there. It won't hurt you.

Re:Numerical intelligence (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234495)

I suggest you have very low reading intelligence. This has nothing to do with sudoku, it has to do with calcudoku which does in fact require basic math skills.

7th post! (3, Interesting)

jc42 (318812) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234163)

Oh, wait ... Hmmm; this is a Safari window. I wonder how Safari users rank.

Maybe I should switch to one of my Chrome or Firefox windows, then I might get it right.

It might be interesting if we could get data on users that run multiple browsers. I have at least 10 browsers on this MacBook Pro, slightly fewer on my Ubuntu and Debian boxes, though I've previously found some that I didn't know I had, so I'm not sure how many more their might be. Lots of us developers collect browsers for testing against.

Anyway, it could be interesting if people showed different math abilities when using different browsers. It'd imply that the differences are due to interference from the browsers' UIs, and not inherent in the individual users. I wonder how this study handle such possibilities. We already have good evidence that the programming language you use can help or hinder various sorts of reasoning ability, depending on the way they implement various capabilities. It wouldn't be too surprising if different browsers' UIs affected the ability of users to perform some mental operations. So we don't really know whether this study was comparing the users' math abilities, or the browsers' interference with their users' abilities.

Re:7th post! (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234259)

This UI of the puzzle is the HTML page, and if coded well has no significant difference in the major browsers, therefore the browsers UI itself should have little impact if any on the results. In addition, only a very small percentage of the population are developers with 20 different browsers on their system. Most users use whatever the default browser it, or install their favorite (or geek nephews recommended) browser and use that.

Re:7th post! (4, Interesting)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234505)

Rule number one in science is never to form causation from generaliztion of data. Studies show that rap music makes you a better basketball player. Ice cream can give you heart attacks too. Why?

Statistically most NBA basketball players who are African American listen to rap music, therefore rap music made them great basketball players. The ice cream study was based on very hot days in New York when the temperature soared over 100 degrees. People tend to eat more ice cream on those days and there was also a rise of heart attacks. Therefore ice cream gives you heart attacks.

In Korea there are warning labels that fans give you heart attacks and there are settings to make sure they turn off at night as Koreans believe you can die if you leave the fan on at night. This is because when it is hot people have heart attacks and you can guess where the media made the conclusion.

It is silly and dangerous to make assumptions. You need a full hypothesis and use the standard scientific method to reproduce the results.

For all we know more old people use IE who are mentally further declined, or people went to that site at work when the boss wasn't looking and quickly alt tabbed and let the game time out when work needed them, etc. These are valid reasons and does not equate stupidity for people who use IE. Until we know more we just do not know. The work thing with IE is a very likely reason why a user would stop the puzzle as corporate America loves IE and users tend to hate work.

Re:7th post! (1)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234901)

I don't see anybody claiming causation. Nobody says that using Chrome or Firefox instead of IE will MAKE you smarter. It just shows that people who use Firefox or Chrome tend to be smarter. This conclusion is an obvious one if you think about it. The average person, and the below average person, will most likely use the browser that comes with their computer. And of course, the average or below average person is probably going to have a MS based machine. The average or below average person probably is not even aware that there is an alternative to IE. You have to be an engineer, computer professional, or at the very least someone with a desire to know more about computers to even be aware of the existence of alternative browsers. These types of people are generally smarter than your average bear.
When reading this post, please note that I don't intend to make any absolutes. "On average" should be inferred in front of most of the statements herein. The only reason I didn't type it out every time was because we were already talking about averages.

Re:7th post! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234991)

The conclusion in the story and comments appear that those defient in math use IE. Or people who use Chrome or more OC too.

That is a conclusion even if it is not stated directly. While I do agree with the unscientific general notion that dumber people tend to use IE more because they do not want to go through the hassle of knowing another browser or downloading and installing one. However, recent statistics show Chrome users are switching not from Firefox but from IE so maybe the technologically challenged like the fact that the just click on the Google AD and TADA they have Chrome. Never estimate ease of use.

But I am making generalizations that could be false based on data this past year. This is just one site and could mean anything.

I could see older people using IE because their brains are not as equiped to try new things too but that does not mean they are dumber. Many older people like my Mom use these soduku puzzles to keep them mentally alert.

Re:7th post! (1)

enrgeeman (867240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39235015)

Not that it changes your underlying point, but the main reason Koreans don't sleep with the fan on is not because it causes heart attacks, but because it either a) sucks the air out of the room, or b) chops up the air such that they cannot breathe. Both lead to suffocation, and death, but the "reason" ro different. Doesn't make it any less crazy, though.

Re:7th post! (1)

lucm (889690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234615)

I have at least 10 browsers on this MacBook Pro, slightly fewer on my Ubuntu and Debian boxes [...] Lots of us developers collect browsers for testing against.

One OSX and two Debians. It appears to me that you are missing a significant browser market share (and I'm not talking about Lynx).

This being said, I'd be curious to see the user agent stats for nambla.org - maybe the FBI or NSA could tell us.

Re:7th post! (2)

jc42 (318812) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234759)

Actually, I do have lynx on all my machines, and it's one of the browsers that I test against fairly often. It's one of the useful tools for verifying that pages are accessible to the visually impaired. I've also found it useful in some discussions to mention that on several projects, I've been explicitly order to not test against lynx, or any other tools for the disabled. A lot of management has open contempt for people with physical disabilities, at least here in the US.

wrong conclusion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234171)

Or that IE takes twice as long to load the puzzle than chrome. If it ever loads it properly at all.

Chrome solve time for all sizes (1)

Robadob (1800074) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234177)

Doesn't anyone else find it suspicious that the chrome solve time for all 3 sizes was 100 seconds while ie and firefox both changed?

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (2)

Robadob (1800074) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234185)

"Average solving time as a percentage of the Chrome average (so smaller is better)"

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (2)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234201)

Actually, the data were normalized against the Chrome speed for each category. That's not 100 seconds you're looking at, that's 100 percent of the Chrome rate. It's a weird way of displaying a graph, but if the author hadn't done it then the bars for the larger puzzle sizes would have (presumably) dwarfed the smaller ones, resulting in a loss of visible precision. I guess the more standard solution, using a logarithmic scale, either didn't occur to the author or was for some reason infeasible.

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234267)

Here we go, found the actual data in the paper:

browser: 4x4 5x5 6x6
Internet Explorer: 30.9, 73.4, 262
Firefox: 29.4, 70.2, 245
Chrome: 22.0, 61.1, 233

Of course, this doesn't disprove the leading theory, which is that the analysis is total garbage. The number of potential mitigating factors (e.g. "Hey look, solving a browser-based puzzle game reflects the speed of the browser's javascript interpreter!") and alternative hypotheses (such as "IE users haven't invested time in changing their browsers, therefore they aren't interested in investing time to do stuff with their computers in general...") are just too numerous. We can write this story off, entirely, as denigrating propaganda. But maybe that should be expected.

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234469)

Wow, you must be a piss poor biologist since you don't seem to understand how science works. No experiment is complete by itself but every piece of data is useful. Your 'hypothesis' is easily testable, and you could probably just ask the guy and he might even have the answer of whether or not the browser has anything to do with it, e.g. puzzle time starts once ui drawn, or time starts when first input, or before the ui is even created.

As well, unless the guy wrote a very bad program he's not going to start the timer before the puzzle is even drawn. A confounding factor that none of you seem capable of thinking of would actually be network latency.

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (2)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234649)

I see you're quite a good conversationalist; you must be quite a blast at parties. No, the claim that Javascript interpreter speed may have a role in browser performance is not easily testable because the author lumped different versions of the browsers together. It's possible that some obscure intermediary version of Firefox, for example, had an exceptionally poor performance, and that this skewed the data. I have in fact determined that Aurora 12.0a2 seems to have no performance difference between IE 8 on my laptop, but this does not necessarily mean, either, that IE 6 performance is entirely ignorable. Given the statistics for overall browser usage [statcounter.com] it would be exceptionally improbable that these have an overwhelming role in confounding results, but the landscape could still be measurably different as a result. Given that Javascript engine performance has increased dramatically as a priority for browser manufacturers in the past five years, this data incorporates information from a very broad set of configurations.

At any rate, I find it very disappointing that you chose to focus entirely on one statement about Javascript engines and not consider the rest of my post, or the larger significance of the point I was making. Instead you chose to attack (and violently, I might add) one relatively arbitrary theory when you could have contributed by gently stating any objections, before positing your own.

Here is an example of how to make a rebuttal correctly, for future reference: "over the span of a million data points from across the planet, it seems unlikely that network latency would have presented a bias towards one browser or another, particularly since the differences are on the order of magnitude of several dozen seconds, the application does not need to talk to the server for the player's experience to continue. To produce the kinds of bias observed given the nature of the application, Firefox users would have to be several times further from the Earth than the moon."

Perhaps the phenomenal absurdity of your suggestion explains why none of us are capable of thinking of it. Unless you meant to say network bandwidth, as in "IE users are all on dial-up, which is why they haven't spent the time to download a more secure browser, and it actually takes them 30 seconds to download the page," in which case I sincerely hope your entire post was made in jest, and that you have something better to do than make condescending remarks about intellect.

Re:Chrome solve time for all sizes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234363)

Evidently you don't use chrome

Chrome. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234179)

Why are the most intelligent people using a browser that tracks their every move?

Re:Chrome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234367)

Because they know how to disable it since every option is toggleable in the browser options and has been since 0.3, from personal experience. (which I still have installed, strangely...)

Re:Chrome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234533)

Why are the most intelligent people believing a browser that tracks their every move would really allow them to turn that off?

they have to be (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234187)

in order to keep up with the current version number.

The puzzle is poor (1)

paulatz (744216) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234221)

TI be honest, I've just had a go at the "puzzle" (I suspect having it on slashdot was the main post of all this "statistics"). It is just poor, like sudoku, which I already find boring, but worst. It is harder to find out what the rules are that to actually solve it. And the website looks really amateurish. Really, do not waste you time with this puzzle, no matter which browser you use. BTW, I personally use opera.

Re:The puzzle is poor (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234485)

Really, there's written instructions as well as a video explaining how to solve it right there in big letters. They're actually quite fun as well,

fails to account for browser perf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234229)

The true test would be to take the users and have them all solve the puzzles on a totally different browser. Without normalizing for various perf issues your test only says something about the combination of user and browser.

look at it another way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234287)

Chrome users are the type to have a sufficiently narrow set of abilities that they can solve silly puzzles but they can't conceive of a problem with one large corporation collecting huge amounts of data about people across the world.

It's sorta like seeing that IQ correlates with financial success, where financial success by definition requires a willingness to amass financial wealth and mostly depends on high skill in a very narrow set of abilities.

Re:look at it another way (1)

dmesg0 (1342071) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234489)

Are members of MSA (Microsoft Shills Anonymous) even allowed on Slashdot?

Re:look at it another way (1)

lucm (889690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234637)

Chrome users are the type to have a sufficiently narrow set of abilities that they can solve silly puzzles but they can't conceive of a problem with one large corporation collecting huge amounts of data about people across the world.

It's sorta like seeing that IQ correlates with financial success, where financial success by definition requires a willingness to amass financial wealth and mostly depends on high skill in a very narrow set of abilities.

Could you say "narrow set of abilities" once more, I'm really getting in a kinky mood

None with curl?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234291)

Real geniuses use curl!!!

Yawn, who cares. (2)

xaoslaad (590527) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234355)

If I use my Mac I use Safari. If I use my Fedora laptop I use Firefox. If use my Windows PC I use IE.

Any one of them works fine for me. If I can look at web pages and Bookmark/Favorite things it does 99.99% of what I want. I keep all my systems up to date, and run active AV of Windows. I'm not in the habit of viewing a wide range of shady web sites either. To top it off I can't think of a site I use that is not compatible with all three. And it is enough of a headache keeping 3 different systems up to date (nevermind the add virtual machines) without downloading extra browsers and making sure they're up to date separately.

Basically, who cares what browser you use. I doubt it defines you, me, or anyone else.

Re:Yawn, who cares. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234591)

Basically, who cares what browser you use. I doubt it defines you, me, or anyone else.

Thanks for playing along, killjoy.

Re:Yawn, who cares. (1)

travbrad (622986) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234899)

Keeping Chrome/IE "up to date" is pretty darn easy. If they are installed and connected to the internet, they are always up to date.

Another take, from a Firefox user (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234383)

The number of abandoned puzzles (started but never finished) was also significantly higher for IE users.

Or, perhaps, IE users were more likely to have a life away from their computer. Maybe they abandoned the puzzle because they had to get ready for one of those "dates" - something Chrome users may have read about on Wikipedia.

Correlation, casuation, etc... (1)

slasho81 (455509) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234397)

"Chrome users are best with numbers." is a phrasing that indicates causation. This is Slashdot, so no need to remind everyone that correlation does not imply causation, right?

Re:Correlation, casuation, etc... (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234481)

The causation probably is: More educated or intelligent people have learned about Chrome and have switched.
The default browser on the most widespread system is always the one that will have the least sophisticated users.

Re:Correlation, casuation, etc... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234509)

No, it doesn't. "Chrome makes you better with numbers" indicates causation. Given (for the sake of argument -- I'm aware of the reasons for doubting the validity of this study) that Chrome users are best with numbers, how do you propose to state that without implying whether chrome usage causes numeracy, vice versa, or they're both effects of some other cause? I think that statement is about as neutral as it can be.

Re:Correlation, casuation, etc... (1)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234645)

"Chrome usage is correlated with Calcudoku proficiency"

And the OPERA users.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234405)

were so far off the scale that they had to be left out, otherwise there would be no apparent difference between all the others....

Re:And the OPERA users.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234843)

No, the opera users, all 5 of them, were not included in this sample set, because they were doing this back in 2003, then they moved on to much more advanced games.

Proof that IE is stupid.... ?? (1)

Tim12s (209786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234451)

Proof that IE is stupid.... ??

Need more details (2, Insightful)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234541)

If you're going to write a paper, put the relevant details in. What kind of statistical tests did you do? What correction for multiple comparisons did you do? What are the actual p-values you obtained, for each test? Are the distributions of your data normal? Do they meet the assumptions of your test?

Re:Need more details (1)

dr_blurb (676176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234801)

Most of this info is in fact in the paper.

The actual p-values I can put in an updated version (they were all less than 5%).

And... (1)

no1home (1271260) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234721)

Those of us who use all three (IE 'cause I have to at work) are confused.

Regression to the mean ? (1)

wrencherd (865833) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234811)

Doesn't this more likely mean that there are just a lot more people using IE than Chrome and so their average is going to be closer to the mean of the greater population?

On the other hand, I don't use Chrome, so my maths may not be as high good as my Englishin' and grammarin' is.

IQ quick fix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39234855)

I'm smart, I'm switching to chrome right now!

tired (2)

Mariomario (2558403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39234917)

Tired of these "studies" that shows better apples uses a certain orange. Personally, I use Firefox and IE and find no difference between them. Sometimes something don't work on one of them, so I do it on the other. Considering IE comes as default on windows. Studies like this is like saying "Players who play games with default settings are stupid, and players who edit the settings are smart." Just because you have not found a need to change the settings dose not automatically mean your stupid.

/sigh (2)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39235031)

a site were you can solve Calcudoku number puzzles.

Ahem. [wikipedia.org]

And publishing your "paper" on your own website doesn't make it peer-reviewed either.

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