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210 comments

found it (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263702)

what'd she do, look behind her?

never gets old

Re:found it (-1, Offtopic)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264162)

I left it in my other pants...

Somewhere in the back of the student fridge... (3, Funny)

Lemming Mark (849014) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263712)

...mouldy bit it'll probably still be tasty if you scrape it off a bit.

i know (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263720)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_obese_celebrities

gotcha:)

Late to University, then? (-1)

dmomo (256005) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263724)

That missing mass is called "the Freshman 15", Doll.

Let me guess... (0)

quarkoid (26884) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263726)

It was found down the back of the sofa - it's the first place one should look for missing things.

Re:Let me guess... (1)

biometrizilla (1999728) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264024)

Nope, she saw Kim Kardashian walking away from her.

missing mass in my pants (0)

slashpot (11017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263734)

I have a missing mass in my pants.

I was behind the couch (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263750)

With Bob the dinosaur!

Cool (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263752)

What was his name, and was he just here to play skeeball?

Different perspective needed. (1)

zoloto (586738) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263760)

Telescope must have been upside-down.

Re:Different perspective needed. (4, Funny)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263826)

Of course it was. She's Australian!

age (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263768)

Why is it that the younger the person who does something, the more special people think it is? I call it the "America's Got Talent" effect.

Maybe Slashdot should start including the age of everyone mentioned. ("CEO of Microsoft, age 55, throws chair ... ")

Re:age (5, Insightful)

hackertourist (2202674) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263958)

Perhaps more surprising is the prof's willingness to share credit for the discovery with his student.

Ahhh - the prof is a beauty (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264630)

Perhaps even more surprising is the prof's willingness to share her beauty with the Slashdot crowd: http://www.physics.monash.edu.au/people/research/lazendic.html

Re:age (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264700)

Nah. Let me put it this way: What do summer students become? Answer: Grad students. Who does all the actual work in science? Answer: Grad students. You work it out.

Re:age (5, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264410)

Why is it that the younger the person who does something, the more special people think it is? I call it the "America's Got Talent" effect.

At least in science it seems the body of human knowledge continues to expand. Like many of the math theorems that requires years of field theory and calculus to even understand WTF the theorem is about. Try for example reading the proof of Fermat's last theorem without developing a brain aneurysm. It's like they talk Greek and Latin and ancient Hebrew and something you could swear is alien.

That young people still discover things is proof there's still low hanging fruit or that exceptional talent matters more than a PhD and 20 years of working with the subject matter. Of course there's many cookie cutter professors too but usually there are some that are exceptional talents and PhDs and have worked on it 20 years who has picked clean any reasonably accessible discovery.

Same with for example physics, unless you're at the Tevatron or CERN it's unlikely you'll find any new elementary particles, add any new entries to the periodic table, build carbon nanotubes, high-temperature superconductors or anything else that will make a huge impact, compared to the relatively simple lab equipment 100 years ago. That's why the young ones are news, because they're the exceptions.

Missing mass eating server? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263770)

Did the missing mass form a black hole which then sucked the server in, it is it just the regular Slashdot effect?

Re:Missing mass eating server? (1)

KDingo (944605) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264172)

It's just hosted on the other side of the universe. There might be some latency.

They found something else, too... (5, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263778)

They managed to find a female astrophysics student. Anyone in physics can tell you that is a great discovery in and of itself.

Re:They found something else, too... (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263836)

But does she look like Jodie Foster?

Re:They found something else, too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263890)

Cute for an astrophysicts

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/technology/sci-tech/amelias-summer-job-finding-part-of-the-universe-20110526-1f6h5.html

Re:They found something else, too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264260)

You'd hit her. With the missing mass.

Re:They found something else, too... (0)

dnormant (806535) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264016)

You could try to friend her?

http://www.facebook.com/people/Amelia-Fraser-Mckelvie/682534821 [facebook.com]

Re:They found something else, too... (1)

souravzzz (2001514) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264136)

Facebook is slashdotted!

Re:They found something else, too... (5, Funny)

PastaLover (704500) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264472)

This is why we can't have nice things.

Re:They found something else, too... (2)

ewoods (108845) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264270)

Samantha Carter (SG-1) is wayyyy hotter than Jodie Foster.

Re:They found something else, too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264566)

But Foster's character was much more intoxicating with her stubborn SETI-awesomeness.

Re:They found something else, too... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264252)

About 50% of graduate students in astronomy/astrophysics are now female, at least at 'top' departments. Physics, not so much. It will be interesting to see in 10 years or so if that is reflected in new faculty hires.

Go into astrophysics for the babes: (1)

Hartree (191324) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264520)

There were several very cute female astrophysics grad students at UNM when I went there in 1993. Likely even more of them now.

Re:They found something else, too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264728)

> They managed to find a female astrophysics student. Anyone in physics can tell you that is a great discovery in and of itself.

I'd be happy to find the page, since it seems the newsarticle is missing from internet space.

Noteworthiness (1)

Twinbee (767046) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263780)

Any astrophysicists (or at least postgrads) here to say how important or true this achievement really is?

Re:Noteworthiness (1)

Albanach (527650) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263798)

The server is located amongst the universe's missing mass, so it may take some time.

Re:Noteworthiness (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264404)

True dat. Web page was Slashdotted, not responding. Try again later. (11-05-27, 9:30 a.m. PDT)

Re:Noteworthiness (5, Informative)

XiaoMing (1574363) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263854)

Any astrophysicists (or at least postgrads) here to say how important or true this achievement really is?

The article (got to it prior Newton's First Law of ./ effect) actually did quite a good job of addressing exactly that.

Takeaways were:
-Missing mass (not dark matter, but matter which was seen to exist during creation of universe but is now someplace different) turns out to have migrated to filaments that span across the universe.
-Claimed that astrophysicists have long postulated (~2 decades) that the mass had moved there, but that the imaging capabilities weren't able to resolve it.
-Then in a fit of bipolar impetus, also went on to say how exciting a discovery this was for the community.
-Finally acknowledged that most likely nothing useful (to mankind) will come of this discovery.

Re:Noteworthiness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263962)

Finally acknowledged that most likely nothing useful (to mankind) will come of this discovery.

Until someone develops the filament interstellar TSB (Time and Space Bending) Drive!

I refuse to use the term "Warp"

Re:Noteworthiness (1)

butalearner (1235200) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264420)

-Missing mass (not dark matter, but matter which was seen to exist during creation of universe but is now someplace different) turns out to have migrated to filaments that span across the universe.

Sounds like physical philotic rays to me. Is that you, Jane?

Re:Noteworthiness (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264550)

Finally acknowledged that most likely nothing useful (to mankind) will come of this discovery.

Wait... does that qualifier mean that it might be useful to our alien overlords or something?

Re:Noteworthiness (5, Informative)

radtea (464814) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263984)

Any astrophysicists (or at least postgrads) here to say how important or true this achievement really is?

It's fairly significant. They have confirmed that some fraction of the missing baryonic matter (the ordinary stuff we are made of, like Galactic Dark Matter, not the exotic new-particle stuff) is in the filaments that exist on very large scales in the universe. If they had failed to find it the result would have been more interesting, but even so they've done a good bit of science by testing the idea that the missing baryonic matter is in these filaments by actually going and looking for it rather than taking it on faith that it must be there.

We know there is missing baryonic matter because we know what the baryonic density in the universe is from the primordial helium/hydrogen ratio. Free neutrons only live about fifteen minutes, so as the Big Bang cooled and neutrons and protons condensed out of the primordial quark-gluon plasma there was a relatively short interval in which helium could form. We know the size of the universe at that time from the temperature, and we know the density because the denser it was the more neutrons would have been captured onto protons to form heavier isotopes, so by figuring out the primordial density of deuterium, helium and lithium we can put pretty strong constraints on the total baryonic mass of the universe.

Re:Noteworthiness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264384)

"Fairly significant" -_-

Dead server is dead! (1)

Chas (5144) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263806)

Way to go Slashdot!

Yeah. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263810)

It was your mom.

Another source for the story (4, Informative)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263812)

Re:Another source for the story (1)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263842)

BTW, this discovery has nothing whatever to do with dark matter.

Re:Another source for the story (1)

boristhespider (1678416) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264244)

you wouldn't believe it reading the drivel that the popular press have been writing about it. you'd have thought the words "electron density" would have given it away that we're not talking dark matter here, but no. STUDENT FINDS MISSING MATTER scream the headlines. "ok, fair enough," you think. then the article is filled with things about dark matter. pah.

Slashdotted in 3... 2... 1... (1)

RussellSHarris (1385323) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263838)

Since the submitter cleverly decided to force people to visit TFA if they want to know what the missing mass actually was, where it is, or how she found it, imagine my disappointment when I couldn't due to a slashdotting.

Re:Slashdotted in 3... 2... 1... (1)

mustPushCart (1871520) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264292)

I would blame a lot of the slashdotters for wanting to see if tfa had a picture of the oz math 22 year old genius. Facebook says shes alright ;)

Just Google (2)

nwf (25607) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263866)

One could just google for copies of the story. I found tons, e.g.here [universetoday.com] or a summary here [rationalskepticism.org] .

Basically, he located the mystery material within vast structures called "filaments of galaxies".

Now why /. can auto-parse some URLs and not others is anyone's guess.

She. Not a "he". (3, Interesting)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264558)

Amelia Fraser-McKelvie [brisbanetimes.com.au]

You might have found me (2, Funny)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263870)

But you'll never catch me!

Re:You might have found me (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264710)

In space, no one can hear a Greased Up Deaf Guy [cheezburger.com] scream.

Ok, interestingish (5, Informative)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263914)

A student has found that if you observe in the x-ray range you discover ordinary matter between the galaxies that was clearly evident in the early universe and isn't visible in other parts of the spectrum.

I'm not sure that it's altogether news that different frequencies let you see different things - to me, by far the biggest news is that despite having x-ray telescopes for a very long time and computers quite capable of crunching that data to detect potentially interesting observations, the astronomers have been opting for cheap student labor instead.

Re:Ok, interestingish (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264086)

This is definitely an article in favor of student labor - it appears they are using her to claim a theory held by the research team is correct by having her assert the same thing the team did in suggesting that is where the missing matter is to begin with. In other words: the guy said "the missing mass is probably in those filaments", the girl said "I can see the filaments" - I fail to see how this proves anything one way or another that wasn't already known (ie: that there are filaments) - but I wouldn't be surprised if they're fucking.

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264290)

Wow. You really are a patronizing prick, aren't you?

Re:Ok, interestingish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264094)

the student had won a competition to take part in a camp over the holidays.

read this story a couple of days ago but iirc it was all paid for.

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264194)

Sure it was paid for, but which costs more? A 1024-node supercomputer or an intern?

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264196)

Good point. I think we should name "students" the official SI unit for menial work in academia.

Re:Ok, interestingish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264356)

That would be great for the total amount of menial work. As an addition, to describe the level of menial-ness, modifiers such as undergrad intern, rotation grad, pre-candidacy, etc...

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264570)

Actually "students" are what separate the research professors from the hazardous substances. Didn't you read the safety guidelines? :P

Re:Ok, interestingish (5, Informative)

Xerxes314 (585536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264346)

Here's the paper: An estimate of the electron density in filaments of galaxies at z~0.1 [arxiv.org] .

The student got listed as first author, which is cool for her. The paper itself is a follow-up to Pimbblet's (the actual prof with the actual grant) 2004 study of filaments. The major finding seems to be that the press is gullible enough to print anything if you say an undergrad did the work. In this case, the press manages to avoid looking like total idiots, since the study is pretty cool and interesting. Nonetheless, the hype is vastly out of proportion to the significance.

Re:Ok, interestingish (0)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264548)

If I recall correctly, authors are listed in the reverse order of importance. Thus, to be listed first is to be described as of least significance. Which, if I'm right, won't do her much credit in academia.

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

TeethWhitener (1625259) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264684)

You're wrong. To be listed first author is generally an indication that you did the bulk of the work for the paper. Middle authors are usually minor contributors to some extent, and the last few names are usually the professors who employ the students/postdocs.

Re:Ok, interestingish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264612)

true, but it's just as much a discovery as an archeologist could make; i.e. "look what i found"

Re:Ok, interestingish (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264738)

Well, no. I don't agree. An archaeologist in the field can't be replaced by a computer down the hallway. It is quite impossible for a computer to tell you what you will find if you dig 7 feet at position X. On the other hand, a computer and a human eye can equally spot abnormalities in an x-ray image of intergalactic space. (Computers cannot be better, as to prevent false positives and false negatives, the algorithm must be calibrated by eye and the positives then validated by eye. What they CAN do better is sort through reams of useless junk to spot potential gems of data that can then be analyzed by experts.)

This doesn't mean that she didn't discover something significant. I'm happy to accept that she may well have done. That's not the issue. The issue is why, given the enormous amount of time the means of computerizing this sort of study has existed, students are doing the menial work. If students should be involved at all, they should be getting the results from the computer doing the menial work and then doing something REAL.

Far from a criticism of the student, who did a fine job with the dismally pathetic material available, my criticism is of those making inefficient use of student time.

predictable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263916)

It was your mom!

TFA sucks (-1, Troll)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263918)

TFA sucks bigtime... does the student?

Missing mass but not "dark matter" (3, Informative)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263920)

If I'm reading TFA correctly, this material is mass we already knew had to be around but didn't know where it had gone to. According to TFA, the student in question, Amelia Fraser-McKelvie, the mass in question is essentially conventional mass that is in so called "filaments" between galaxies.

skillz (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36263930)

What a poorly written article. Plus once I see PC words used like diverse used in anything, I just can't take it seriously. The article sucked.

/.ed (1)

Blackajack (1856892) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263934)

Any other sources? Looks like slashdot syndrome claims another victim..

Re:/.ed (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263974)

no, there are no other source. Also, there is no way to search for them~

Sheesh.

Re:/.ed (1)

Blackajack (1856892) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264240)

That was helpful, thank you.

Re:/.ed (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264396)

CoralCache [nyud.net] has a mirror of the original. If you're one of the people who regularly Rs TFA and runs Firefox with Greasemonkey I recommend downloading a script that automatically rewrites /. links to use CC.

Kinda OT - black holes (1)

beschra (1424727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36263992)

The closing line about justifying funding for pure physics research 'Do you use a mobile phone? Some of that technology came about by black hole research'."

To what bit of mobile phone technology is he referring?

Re:Kinda OT - black holes (5, Funny)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264112)

The closing line about justifying funding for pure physics research 'Do you use a mobile phone? Some of that technology came about by black hole research'."

To what bit of mobile phone technology is he referring?

AT&T's network.

YOUR MOM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264000)

A 22-year-old Australian university student has found your mom. Seriously, she's that huge.

Next up... (0, Offtopic)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264052)

Yes, but did she find Jesus?

I keep getting that question from random people. "Have you found Jesus?" That guy must be seriously lost. I mean worse than Charlie Sheen's television career, or Donald Trump's political ambitions. Totally gone.

Re:Next up... (4, Funny)

boristdog (133725) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264150)

Well, the missing mass was being held by the Space Pope...

Re:Next up... (1)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264186)

Yes, but did she find Jesus?

I keep getting that question from random people. "Have you found Jesus?" That guy must be seriously lost. I mean worse than Charlie Sheen's television career, or Donald Trump's political ambitions. Totally gone.

You too? I really wish someone would find that guys so people would stop asking me where he is.

Is anyone out there good at finding Waldo and Carmen Sandiego? Maybe we could recruit those people to to find him. Or, I bet Seal Team 6 could find him.

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264220)

You don't find Jesus. Jesus finds you.

Hmm, there's probably a Soviet Russia joke in there somewhere... :P

Re:Next up... (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264328)

Go to Mexico. Lots of people called Jesus live there, and by random luck at least one of them might be lost..

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264362)

Yeah, he was between my couch cushions.

okay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264060)

Lets go ahead and get all the "your mama" jokes out.

Horrible article/summary (4, Informative)

forand (530402) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264120)

The summary and article are making a mountain out of a mole hill. The student did good work but did not 'find the missing mass' in the universe. Here is a link to the publicly accessible article on arXiv:
http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.0711 [arxiv.org]
The abstract does not make any grandiose claims of finding the missing mass of the universe but instead states how the article presents properties of mass in filaments.

Re:Horrible article/summary (1)

cinderellamanson (1850702) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264458)

"The paper has been accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society."

Probably stupid question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264170)

...but does it mean that there's no dark matter afterall?

Re:Probably stupid question... (1)

boristhespider (1678416) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264298)

no. this is not about dark matter. this is about "missing" normal matter.

Re:Probably stupid question... (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264460)

...but does it mean that there's no dark matter afterall?

No. It just means that there's as much ordinary matter now as there was after the big bang, and we now know where it is.

Miss Universe? (1)

DarkLensman (703754) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264174)

I misread that as "finding Miss Universe's mass" and wondered about the method used.

must be the heat (3, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264218)

i read

"Student Finds Miss Universe's Mass"

Re:must be the heat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264756)

"Student Finds Miss Universe's Mass"

Turns out Tyler Durden had it.

P.S. Anyone need soap?

Black Hole Research (1)

JRHelgeson (576325) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264322)

From TFA:
"Whenever I speak to people who have influence, politicians and so on, they sometimes ask me 'Why should I invest in physics pure research?'. And I sometimes say to them: 'Do you use a mobile phone? Some of that technology came about by black hole research'."

So that explains why I can never retrieve the information that gets entered into my phone!

Its alway... (0)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264430)

In the last place you look.

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264448)

... if this is the explanation for the "freshman fifteen".

I thought it was at fast food restaurants (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264476)

Have you seen the excess of mass at McDonalds? And don't get me started on "Kentucky Fried Chicken!"

I already knew.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264482)

It was in Uranus all along.

Epic mass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36264508)

The universe was hiding its massive girth inside its corset.

Damn I knew I forgot something... (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264532)

while packing those crates to leave Australia.

DRAT!!! (1)

jmd_akbar (1777312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264576)

I thought I had hidden it well..

Well, looks like i'll have to delete the evidence again....


CLEANUP TIME A-HOY!!

Don't Worry (1, Funny)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264622)

If the missing mass of the universe is identified it will only take a few minutes for Microsoft to try to patent it.

The Universe's Little Black Dress (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36264666)

She discovered it upon reflecting that women lie about their weight. The missing mass is discovered by asking the husband when he is too drunk to know better than to be honest.

Yes, universe, that dress DOES make you look fat.

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