Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Superconductor Research Points To New Phase of Matter

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the older-phases-are-now-passe dept.

Science 59

unil_1005 writes "Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a puzzling gap in the electronic structures of some high-temperature superconductors could indicate a new phase of matter. Understanding this 'pseudogap' has been a 20-year quest for researchers who are trying to control and improve these breakthrough materials, with the ultimate goal of finding superconductors that operate at room temperature. 'Our findings point to management and control of this other phase as the correct path toward optimizing these novel superconductors for energy applications, as well as searching for new superconductors,' said Zhi-Xun Shen of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Boring. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611690)

It don't matter to me.

Re:Boring. (0)

cranil (1983560) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611728)

so what's the point of replying to the article?

Re:Boring. (1, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612072)

So folks like you get a WHOOSH! through your brain?

(Think about it again, slowly this time)

Woosh! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612686)

It's times like these that Slashdot's no delete/edit policy on posts really sticks you in the ass, no?

Re:Woosh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35613018)

Someone should probe into this matter.

Re:Boring. (2)

stms (1132653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611900)

You obviously have no idea what the implications of a finding a room temperature super-conductor are they're actually very exciting and at the very lest not boring. It would push most of our technology forward at least 20 years if we can find a way to mass produce one. Since you obviously use technology it defiantly does matter to you.

Re:Boring. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612050)

That's not gas whooshing over your head.

Re:Boring. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612044)

It don't matter to me.

ah i see wat you did there. some reason people dont apriciate puns on slashdot

Re:Boring. (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612490)

Apriciate Jam ROCKS!

Re:Boring. (2)

CnlPepper (140772) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612806)

We don't appreciate it because it was lame.

Re:Boring. (2)

fotoflojoe (982885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612680)

Your post made me laugh. The replies made me sad, knowing that Sheldon Cooper is alive and well.

4th phase discovered in 1987... (0)

LordStormes (1749242) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611746)

There's solid, liquid, gas, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jell-O [wikipedia.org] . This phase also includes such phenomena as peanut butter and jelly (though not together in a sandwich; the bread acts as a catalyst that solidifies the compounds).

Fueled by the power of your yellow sun. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611788)

Cosbynite, my only weakness.

Re:Fueled by the power of your yellow sun. (1)

lysdexia (897) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612040)

It would be hard to win a thread with more grace.
/me doffs hat

Re:4th phase discovered in 1987... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611864)

This phase also includes such phenomena as peanut butter and jelly (though not together in a sandwich; the bread acts as a catalyst that solidifies the compounds).

Then you're doing it wrong; in a properly built peanut butter and jelly sandwich the bread merely acts as containment for the gooey deliciousness inside.

What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (2)

VMaN (164134) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611824)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bose%E2%80%93Einstein_condensate

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611852)

There are lots and lots of phases of matter, the 3 (or maybe 4 depending on your teacher) that you learned about in elementary science classes are just the most common.

That's because... (4, Funny)

earls (1367951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611874)

They're the only phases that matter.

Re:That's because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611944)

"In physics and chemistry, plasma is a state of matter similar to gas in which a certain portion of the particles are ionized."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_(physics)

"A Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is a state of matter of a dilute gas of weakly interacting bosons confined in an external potential and cooled to temperatures very near absolute zero (0 K or 273.15 C[1])."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bose-Einstein_condensate

Re:That's because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612098)

I'm almost positive that he was making a (bad) joke not asking for a citation.

Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612888)

Wow, what is with slashdot today! It's like woosh city.

Re:Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35613022)

Wow, what is with slashdot today! It's like woosh city.

It's not so much woosh city or an IQ problem as it is a majority of nerds with no self-worth seizing an opportunity to sound smart and put someone with a presumably lesser level of knowledge in their place. This will put a smile on their face.

These people will ALWAYS re-read their post and pat themselves on the back. The funny thing is coming back and wooshing them and then they realize how stupid they've made themselves sound.

One or more of the following may describe this class of slashfags:

- No sexual partner.
- No sense of satisfaction or usefulness at their job.
- No dependent family members.
- Smaller than normal surplus of monetary funds and/or complete lack of monetary funds.
- No valuable and/or durable property ownership (house, cars, etc.).

Re:Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away? (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35613090)

Wow, thanks for that explanation through demonstration.

Re:That's because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612450)

And hey, this new thing? It's only a phase.

Re:That's because... (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35613208)

That's the phase that pays!

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611990)

just to name the ones i've heard of (through being nothing more than someone who pays attention but without any real interest)

solid
liquid crystal (yes like in watch displays)
liquid
gas
plasma

aside from the liquid crystal (it's a different phase or some such cos it's not the space between the molecules but rather the alignment of the molecules which determine if it's currently solid or liquid) i always liked how science has basically said the world is made of four things; earth, water, air and fire...

oh and as for Bose Einstein Condensate i would think it's still a liquid, be it one with zero friction.

right, enough ramblings.

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612068)

A zero-friction liquid is a superfluid, not a Bose-Einstein condensate. Both superfluids and BEC are distinct phases of matter, though. Simply sharing some properties with another phase is insufficient -- otherwise liquid and gas wouldn't be distinct phases.

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (4, Funny)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612188)

Wouldn't that make a zero-friction liquid, superfluous?

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

tangelogee (1486597) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612464)

Wouldn't that make a zero-friction liquid, superfluous?

badump-ch!

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

Speare (84249) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612676)

Wouldn't that make a zero-friction liquid, superfluous?

Don't mean to rayn on your parade, but I didn't know if you intended that as a physics pun or not. "Fluous" sounds like "fluidity," the reciprocal of viscosity; super-fluidity is sub-viscosity. While it means something else in this case, "fluous" does come from the French fluere, to flow. So, was it on pour poise?

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35614262)

woosh again

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35617744)

You're wooshing, but apart from that fluere doesn't sound particularly french, to me. Couler is to flow, but also to sink. Fluere seems to be to be latin, more likely.

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35622152)

No, because Andy Granatelli's STP [wikipedia.org] would incorporate it as an ingredient

Re:What about Bose Einstein Condensate? (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#35613050)

Would a magnetic jelly be apropos? With some aether butter on a sesame seed bun?

Set Phasers... (0)

earls (1367951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611836)

...to superconduct!

Re:Set Phasers... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612178)

'Our findings point to management and control of this other phase as the correct path toward optimizing these novel superconductors for energy applications, as well as searching for new superconductors,' said Zhi-Xun Shen of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science."

Just before he sent the results of all his and his colleagues work to the Beijing University of Research Theft.

Meanwhile, China has just announced a new research and manufacturing venture with major American companies who don't want to risk returns to shareholders by paying expensive American workers to create technology based on American tax payer funded research. The venture plans on manufacturing room temperature superconductors based on [ahem] new material phase technology developed [ahem] in China around the same time as work done in the U.S.

4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35611868)

I thought plasma, bose-einsten condensate and quark-gluon plasmas were all recognised as seperate states of matter?

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35611974)

That's why no one described it as the "4th" phase of matter. Just a new phase.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (4, Informative)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612010)

Plasma is the fourth "common" phase of matter.

Bose-Einstein condensates and other novel phase are also phases, but aren't exhibited in all materials.

For that matter, most solids, particularly crystalline solids, have many different phases that correspond to different crystalline structures.

Also, "liquid" and "gas" aren't always distinct phases.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35613564)

Can you list some examples where liquid and gas aren't distinct phases? Real question. I'd be interested in reading up on it. I thought one was compressible, while the other isn't. None distinct ones should have interesting properties.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (2)

Biff Stu (654099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35614236)

I believe that the GP is referring to supercritical fluids [wikipedia.org] .

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35614238)

The extremely dense "atmosphere" of a gas giant is like this, IIRC.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35614508)

These are supercritical fluids. If i'm not mistaken, oxygen is one at room temperature. A typical gas to liquid phase transition involves a discontinuity in the density of the fluid with rising pressure and constant temperature; supercritical fluids fail to exhibit this behavior for all pressures at a temperature above the critical point. More interesting, however, is what happens right around the critical point. Specifically, the free energy difference between the gas and liquid phases (just below the critical point) tend towards zero as one approaches this pressure/temperature combination. This results in enormous swings in density within the material for no real reason. That is, the change in density with respect to pressure approaches infinity (or the change in density with respect to volume approaches zero).

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#35622902)

Sorry, it took me a while to notice this response.

I'm forgetting a lot of my thermodynamics terminology, but the type of thermodynamic change between a solid phase and either of the fluid phases is different than the thermodynamic change between the two fluid phases (liquid and gas). You can intuitively see this, since the solid phase (for crystalline things) has a symmetry change and a fundamental change in how the system is ordered. Liquid and gas phases are very similar, except that particles are a lot closer together in liquid.

Anyway, if you look at a phase diagram (a map of phases at different temperatures and pressures), the point where all three phases coexist is the triple point. There's a second point at high temperature and pressure called the "critical point". It's the end of the line that separates the liquid and gas phases. Above the critical point, the liquid and gas phases are the same. In fact, you can start with a liquid, raise the temperature and pressure so that you're past the critical point, lower the pressure, and then lower the temperature and pressure until you end up with a gas, never having crossed a phase transition.

The actual thermodynamics is tricky to understand but very entertaining.

Yes, supercritical fluids.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 3 years ago | (#35631000)

Off the top of my head:
Solid
Liquid
Critical state
Supercritical matter
Gas
Plasma
Liquid crystal
Glass
Bose-Einstein condensate
Fermionic condensate
Rydberg molecule
Superfluid
Quark-Gluon plasma

Probably a few others. And now pseudogap.

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

lysdexia (897) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612018)

On this pathetic plane, perhaps. Others [scribd.com] may have found different metaphors [blogspot.com] .

Re:4th? How about 6th? Or 7th? (1)

Diss Champ (934796) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612028)

There are also liquid crystal phases. Basically, ordered liquids.

There's only one phase of matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612470)

And its name is JESUS

Re:There's only one phase of matter (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612862)

And its name is JESUS

There is only one phase of matter and its name is...

CHUCK NORRIS

non-polluting magnetic power source available (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612042)

as evile flees/is disempowered by the truth, we'll discover what (many of us) have been mislead to believe.

no matter, as the creators' (genuine) big flash will resolve many of our needs to care for each other that are being unmet.

How large can the plumes get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612104)

It would have been nice to know how many electrons are involved.

The spacing of the plumes would perhaps indicate some sort of resonance.

What? Another one? (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 3 years ago | (#35612446)

Aren't there, like, 14 now?

Stanford Institute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35612908)

Cheap looking pages and the pictures taken are likely any dressed up event to give an nice feeling of the area, perhaps to just cover the amount of not too great events that occur on around there.

I could read comments on but it comes part it's not worth it, i'd say same about anything else like that of SCO and Microsoft to others, it's media streams and comerializement of own name within the persons who own internet connection.

Indeed there is some type of an thing at some comments "subject" about thing on towards the book written information, it's still that has the person itself came aware of "liquid crystal phases" to give an informative thing from it, otherwise it's other person published idea on and not fully confirmed either and should not much be used too.

Re:Stanford Institute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35622554)

What is with all these gibberish posts lately? Come on, this isn't a common blog - post the gibberish somewhere else.

My prediction... (1)

Low Ranked Craig (1327799) | more than 3 years ago | (#35613562)

We're going to spend all this time and effort to create room temperature super conductors only to have a bunch of three-legged two-headed aliens develop a bacteria to eat it and make our cities fall.

This... (2)

mpdolan37 (675902) | more than 3 years ago | (#35615350)

does not phase me.

Re:This... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35623700)

That's because your molecular phase inverter is improperly aligned.

Co2 in gans state of matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35616696)

Solid state of matter occurs when molecules are bound to each other due to environmental changes in temperature and/or pressure. When molecules due to their own gravity and magnetic fields come together and form a solid, independent of environmental conditions (such as in a vacuum), that is called Gans state (gas in nano state). For experiment details of co2 in Gans state, check this link: keshefoundation.com/powercells/CO2_paper.pdf

New phase of matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35621476)

Will they discover FLUBBER?

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?