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Extinct Mammoth, Coming To a Zoo Near You

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the no-unauthorized-reproduction dept.

Biotech 312

Techmeology writes "Professor Akira Iritani of Kyoto University plans to use recent developments in cloning technology to give life to the currently extinct woolly mammoth. Although earlier efforts in the 1990s were unsuccessful due to damage caused by extreme cold, Professor Iritani believes he can use a technique pioneered by Dr Wakayama (who successfully cloned a frozen mouse) to overcome this obstacle. This technique will enable Professor Iritani to identify viable cell nuclei, and transfer them to egg cells of an African elephant which will carry the mammoth for a 600 day pregnancy."

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That would be awesome (3, Interesting)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893314)

Pleistocene park, coming soon to a zoo near you. Doesn't quite have the same ring as "Jurassic" though.

Still I am willing to bet that this creature, if created, will be called "Manny", after our Ice Age mammoth movie star... any takers?

Re:That would be awesome (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893324)

Ice Age Park.

I'm sure giving birth to a mammoth will have no negative consequences. :-|

Re:That would be awesome (0)

aztektum (170569) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893356)

I for one welcome or hybrid mutant mammoth-elephant overlords!

Re:That would be awesome (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893584)

hybrid mutant mammoth-elephant

They play an important role in the very good sci-fi novel The Wind-up Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi..

And they are not without negative consequences.

If you haven't read it, you'd probably enjoy it.

Re:That would be awesome (1)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893942)

Also, the third book of Stephen Baxter's Mammoth omnibus.

Re:That would be awesome (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893892)

Really? UID < 200K and that's the best you've got?

Re:That would be awesome (1)

meerling (1487879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893936)

Do you think they'll have nut obsessed rodents?

The birthing is unlikely to have negative effects since both species are closely related, have the same approximate size, and have no known physiognomy variations that can cause issues. Unless the host mother is allergic to mammoth wool... :)

Re:That would be awesome (4, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893532)

Meh.

We wiped them out once, we can do it again. If you're descended from genes too slow to outrun and outwit a woolly mammoth, how the fuck did you get here in the first place?

Re:That would be awesome (2)

JustOK (667959) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893754)

The RCMP will save us again. The M is for Mamouth, and of course the old saying "We always get our mamouth."

before you do it (1, Insightful)

Bizzeh (851225) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893338)

before the hundreds of comments saying that this is wrong and shouldnt happen show up... dont bother.... lighten up and have a drink

Re:before you do it (4, Funny)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893380)

Fuck that, I can't wait until one of these things goes nuts and starts goring the fuck out of everything.

Re:before you do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893864)

They need to breed a whole army of these things, then set them loose.

Re:before you do it (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893390)

Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.

Re:before you do it (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893454)

before the hundreds of comments saying that this is wrong and shouldnt happen show up... dont bother.... lighten up and have a drink

fact of the matter is, the people who want to do this "just cuz we can lulz" are morons. really, really stupid.

think of all the damage kudzoo is doing in habitats where it is non-native. same deal with lots of other organisms that are NOT extinct. they hop aboard ships and such and find themselves in a new environment where they have no natural predators. then they overrun the place. these are organisms that have merely changed location in space. we've had similar problems with frogs and hornets and other invasive non-native species.

what other things can happen with organisms that have changed location in time? how will the ecosystem handle their sudden reappearance? what pressing need do we have for mammoths that overrides the risk? none.

this is just plain bad decision-making. Jurassic Park is a lot like 1984: it was meant as a warning, not a how-to.

Re:before you do it (4, Insightful)

AshtangiMan (684031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893482)

A warning. Like refer madness was a warning.

Re:before you do it (5, Insightful)

WillDraven (760005) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893586)

If this was an insect or small animal that might escape and breed you could have a point, but we're talking about a MAMMOTH. I seriously doubt they're going to manage to sneak off and start breeding in the wild without anybody noticing.

Re:before you do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893770)

If this was an insect or small animal that might escape and breed you could have a point, but we're talking about a MAMMOTH. I seriously doubt they're going to manage to sneak off and start breeding in the wild without anybody noticing.

and if this is celebrated and touted as "wow look how smart we are, see what we can do?!" you really think it will end with mammoths? silly person.

like the Hermetic Law explains: all things are growing, moving, evolving. becoming more so. spreading. almost nothing is stagnant. this will start with mammoths. it will not end there if it gets off the ground.

Re:before you do it (2)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893788)

I and my marauding hordes of test lab animal liberators will let the mammoths loose on the modern world one dark night. Run like the wind and be free, FREE, Manny! mwuhahahaha!

Re:before you do it (1)

reboot246 (623534) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893812)

If they did, it would make for one hell of a safari. Imagine hunting one of those beasts, but spears only, just like the old days when I was young.

Anybody got some good mammoth recipes?

Re:before you do it (2)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893854)

Mimmoth infestations, on the other hand, are all-but-impossible to eradicate.

Re:before you do it (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893990)

no it still could escape and breed (some one selling the sperm/egg on the black market)

i wouldn't be worried till both gendered dna is floating around, and someone trys breeding them near a habitat they can live in, but even then im sure mammoth meat would be worth a ton and no one with any science background would stop u

Re:before you do it (1)

Denihil (1208200) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893628)

this is a chance for humanity to reverse some extinctions our race may have helped cause. i think it's a great concept and im not sure how a couple extremely large mammals, kept under massive public scrutiny and scientific attention, have some chance of running off and ruining a ecosystem. frankly it sounds a bit nuts.

Re:before you do it (5, Funny)

paiute (550198) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893634)

think of all the damage kudzoo is doing in habitats where it is non-native.

The mammoths will eat all the kudzu.

Re:before you do it (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893794)

yes, and then we can resurrect and let loose saber-toothed tigers to eat the mammoths!

Re:before you do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893898)

A. That's "clone", not "resurrect" -- unless you meant zombie cats, which I have to admit would be kinda cool.

B1. Then we need to clone tar pits.... maybe someone at BP has the requisite expertise?
B2. Or we could clone Neanderthal cavemen -- or just use my boss, it's the same thing.

Re:before you do it (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893988)

you're getting way ahead of the plan's logical steps, the Neanderthals and the creatures that will eat them to spare us a Neanderthal infestation are my solutions #5 and #6.

Re:before you do it (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893818)

Good idea. That shit is hard to kill/control.

Re:before you do it (1)

darthdavid (835069) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894060)

And the saber toothed tigers will eat all the mammoths.

Re:before you do it (0)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893766)

what other things can happen with organisms that have changed location in time? how will the ecosystem handle their sudden reappearance? what pressing need do we have for mammoths that overrides the risk? none.

Eh, we don't really have much need for most of the ecosystem, either. If destroying a particular ecosystem were calamitous, we would have destroyed ourselves a thousand times over already. We don't actually need California Condors, or Nena geese, or polar bears....we try to keep them in the world because we like living in a world with pretty and nice things and animals. Personally I think having mammoths around would be very cool, nice and pretty.

Also, getting your idea of the world from mediocre science fiction from the 90s isn't all that great.

Re:before you do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893840)

And the oceans are big! Let's dump all of our garbage and toxins in them! What could possibly go wrong? Damn hippies, thinking about the well being of other species!

It's all about humans. Destroy everything else. Just because.

Re:before you do it (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893924)

Also, getting your idea of the world from mediocre science fiction from the 90s isn't all that great.

I don't think that's at all fair, Jurassic Park was some of Michael Crichton's finest work.


Wait. That didn't come out right.

Re:before you do it (5, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893918)

This is a little different than insects or plants which invade non-native habitats. Insects, plants, small mammals, etc. all reproduce quickly, and can evade humans easily because of their small size. A few seeds fly around and suddenly there's an epidemic of kudzu, for instance.

Mammoths are very, very large, as should be obvious by their name. They're not going to sneak aboard a cargo ship without being noticed, and then go hide in the wild somewhere and reproduce like rabbits. If anything, they probably have an even longer gestation time than elephants, which already have a ridiculously long gestation time (which is part of why they're going extinct; they can't reproduce fast enough to make up for human predation, even though it's been massively reduced in recent decades).

I think the dangers here are non-existent. Elephants already have a very hard time in the wild; these things aren't going to get out and take over. Even if a couple of mammoths did manage to escape somehow (that'd be a massive security oversight wouldn't it?), it would be easy to find and recapture them within the 2 years or whatever it takes them to make a single baby mammoth. It'd be pretty hard to not notice a woolly mammoth running loose anywhere near humans. These animals are just going to be a curiosity, probably confined to zoos, and I think it's great that it might really happen.

The danger is if this same technology is used to "resurrect" other, much smaller extinct species. What would happen, for instance, if they brought back some prehistoric insects that were alive when the dinosaurs were around? That really could have problems like what you're talking about, because insects (even large ones) grow and reproduce very, very quickly, but are small enough to escape human confinement pretty easily, and then be very hard to track down and exterminate once in the wild.

Or what if they brought back the passenger pigeon, or the dodo bird?

Re:before you do it (1)

tragedy (27079) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893998)

Uh, yeah, because multi-ton animals with a nearly two year gestation period and which don't reach sexual maturity until a year or two later than humans are going to start spreading in the wilds of North America with no hope of stopping them. Yeah, that's not very likely.

Re:before you do it (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893476)

before the hundreds of comments saying that this is wrong and shouldnt happen show up... dont bother.... lighten up and have a drink

I can't. I don't even know what wine goes with elephant, let alone what wine goes with mammoth.

Re:before you do it (2)

PatPending (953482) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893538)

Try a nice Chianti. (At least it pairs well with liver and fava beans.)

Re:before you do it (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894034)

As a diehard Hannibal lecter freak, I must correct you. In the novel, Lecter says, "A census taker tried to quantify me once. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a big Amarone."

Another interesting bit of trivia is that, at the end the novel Hannibal, Lecter doesn't feed Krendler his own brain like he does in the movies. Instead, Lecter and Clarice both eat Krendler's brain before Clarice elopes with him.

Lecter doesn't curse often, but the results are amusing when he does:
"Your [murdered] brother Carlo must smell worse than you do -- he shit when I cut him." (Hannibal)

One more thing - Hannibal is by far the baddest fictional antihero ever. He would literally eat that whiny moralfag Rorshach for breakfast.

Re:before you do it (5, Informative)

PatPending (953482) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893504)

lighten up and have a drink

I shall have a 3,400-year-old Mesoamerican beer [slashdot.org] .

Re:before you do it (1)

djtachyon (975314) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893938)

I like their Dogfish Head's 9000 year old beer recipe [dogfish.com] a lot more, and not just because it's older. You should be able to find some here and there at the moment .. it is "in season". Don't get me wrong, I just had a bottle of Theobroma, it is very good too!

Re:before you do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893702)

great idea! I wonder what wine you serve with roast mammoth.

Have a drink? (1)

Chas (5144) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893786)

Does this mean we'll start seeing pink mammoths too?

Re:Have a drink? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893976)

Does this mean we'll start seeing pink mammoths too?

Bartender, I'll have another . . . and don't worry, the pink mammoth is driving . . .

Re:before you do it (1)

blindseer (891256) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893834)

lighten up and have a drink

Done and done.

But then that was the plan before I read the article, I had a beer in hand before I clicked the link. Does it still count?

Finally, a bit of serious advice on Slashdot (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893920)

lighten up and have a drink

What do you suggest, with a lightly braised mammoth steak? A Montepulciano? Aperole with champagne before the meal? And a good calvados afterwards? I am looking forward to seeing mammoth on the menu in my local restaurants!

Re:before you do it (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894016)

If our ancestors hunted them to extinction, they must be awfully tasty. I say clone away!

jaunty tune (4, Funny)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893350)

I recall the time they found those fossilized mosquitoes and before long they
were cloning DNA
Now I'm being chased by some irate velociraptors
Well believe me...This has been one lousy day

Jurassic Park is frightening in the dark
All the dinosaurs are running wild
Someone shut the fence off in the rain
I admit it's kind of eerie

But this proves my chaos theory
And I don't think I'll be coming back again
Oh no

I cannot approve of this attraction
'Cause getting disemboweled always makes me kind of mad
A huge Tyrannosaurus ate our lawyer
Well I suppose that proves...they're really not all bad

Jurassic Park is frightening in the dark
All the dinosaurs are running wild
Someone let T. Rex out of his pen
I'm afraid those things will harm me
'Cause they sure don't act like Barney
And they think that I'm they're dinner not their friend
Oh no

Jurassic Park is frightening in the dark
All the dinosaurs are running wild
What a crummy weekend this has been
Well this sure ain't no E-ticket
Think I'll tell 'em where to stick it
'Cause I'm never coming back this way again
Oh no...Oh no

Re:jaunty tune (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893508)

+1 Funny for the Weird Al reference (lyrics to "Jurassic Park")

Re:jaunty tune (4, Informative)

Camel Pilot (78781) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893612)

Come on give Weird Al his due

Re:jaunty tune (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893656)

I should have. My fault. Thought it was implied, but I guess that the plebes might not have listened to this particular classic.

Re:jaunty tune (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893848)

and for Jimmy Webb, who wrote MacArthur Park , performed by Richard Harris, of which Weird Al's song was a parody. It's a metaphorical description of the tragic end of a love affair.

Re:jaunty tune (5, Interesting)

skine (1524819) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893768)

It seems a little strange to me that so many sciency-types tend to like Jurassic Park. I mean, yes it does have dinosaurs and a girl who loves Unix.

OTOH: "Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should."

So, in the end, the scientists are blamed for the whole thing. Not the person who decided to make it a theme park. Not the person who disabled all of the security. Not even the person whose job it was to think: "What if all of our security goes?"

The scientists.

Re:jaunty tune (3, Insightful)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894012)

The book was a little different. The blame IMO was more on the way the rich old tycoon wanted to exploit the park for profit at any cost. The movie made him out to be a benevolent grandpa wanting to give every kiddie a stuffed sauropod.

Re:jaunty tune (1)

tragedy (27079) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894046)

Yeah, except the one naysayer scientist (chaos theory, the science that produces neat designs you can put on a t-shirt), who manages to give the impression that chaos theory is some sort of mathematical version of fatalism. Basically his theory seems to be that zoos are a logical impossibility.

Upon Reading the Title (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893376)

I raised my arms and said "YES!" but then I had doubts that it is going to happen anytime soon.

I want the passenger pigeon (2)

gurps_npc (621217) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893422)

And the Dodo. Not to mention the Florida giant beaver.

I can do without the giant sloth, short nosed bear, dire wolves or the saber tooth tigers.

Re:I want the passenger pigeon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893560)

I once knew a gal from Florida with a giant beaver. It was so big a Mammoth could have holed up in there!

Re:I want the passenger pigeon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893562)

I can't eat another Giant Florida Beaver

Re:I want the passenger pigeon (1)

rmm311 (1550631) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893868)

The key is can we clone the Dire Straits.

Re:I want the passenger pigeon (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894042)

I can do without the giant sloth, short nosed bear, dire wolves or the saber tooth tigers.

LARPing won't be complete without real dire wolves.

Enumclaw Man (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893478)

If you thought the story about Enumclaw Man (Kenneth Pinyan) was terrifying, just wait until guys like that get hold of some prehistoric cloned mammals. Eew.

Hmmm... (2)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893496)

So who will be the lucky lady to carry for the first Neandertal born in 25,000 years?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893582)

I'm curious what the mother elephant will think when a mammoth pops out. Would the creature be accepted?

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893662)

Probably; your mother accepted you, didn't she?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893852)

....you ask of a slashdotter, shunned and banished by his mother to the basement?

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893968)

That would be hilarious when the baby was born 100% human. ;-)

Brilliant reality show idea! (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894062)

So who will be the lucky lady to carry for the first Neandertal born in 25,000 years?

Actually sounds like a good idea for a reality show, when Charlie Sheen gets whored out . . . two and a half Neanderthals!

But, I guess, most women folk already have experience with living with Neanderthals.

Pleistocene Park (2)

Troll-Under-D'Bridge (1782952) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893502)

Okay, time to be pedantic [wikipedia.org] . And while the good professor is at it, why not breed some Neanderthals, sabre-toothed cats, or my personal favorite, the hugest of the post-Dinotopian behemoths, the Indricotherium [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Pleistocene Park (3, Informative)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893548)

This technique, I suspect, requires a pretty close relationship. You could probably manage it with Neandertals because they are very close to us, genetically, as mammoths are fairly closely related to modern elephants, but for other extinct animals where there are no close living relatives, I doubt you would be successful.

Re:Pleistocene Park (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893970)

Maybe they could do it over the course of several generations, by splicing genes in gradually. With the first generation, they'd splice in some genes, and create offspring with the closest living relative (for instance, the Indricotherium's closest relative is probably the Rhinoceros). This would effectively create a new species that's a hybrid. With the next generation, they'd splice in more of the original genes, yielding yet another new species, which is closer to the original prehistoric one than before. Repeat until you're at the original species.

Of course, I'm no geneticist, and I'm just talking out my ass here, but given enough time and effort, I think it is possible.

I say blaze ahead fearlessly. (2, Funny)

GeneralEmergency (240687) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893510)

'Cause they might be yummy!

Re:I say blaze ahead fearlessly. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893680)

Like elephant, it wouldn't be a viable food source. 600 day pregnancy?! Holy hell, we're lucky elephants aren't extinct.

Re:I say blaze ahead fearlessly. (5, Informative)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893708)

Some specimens [straightdope.com] were preserved well enough for people to try to take a bite. Most accounts of this are dubious at best but a few more credible accounts of having eaten mammoth flesh described it as being quite nasty. This is to be expected of a carcass that has been sitting frozen and half rotten in the Arctic since the last ice age. Now supposing that we found a few cell nuclei that looked good, the most likely outcome would be several hundred failed attempts if prior cloning experience is any indication. Genetic damage could in principle be corrected to a degree by hybridizing the broken strands with a very closely related species (in the case of dinosaurs it would be bird DNA; Ostriches to be specific, not frogs as was suggested in the Jurassic Park movies)

Re:I say blaze ahead fearlessly. (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893844)

Our ancestors certainly thought so - I'm pretty sure they ate them all.

Chicken (1)

joeme1 (959209) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893522)

I just hope it doesn't taste like chicken. I'm imagining something along the line of moose, only older and freezer burnt.

Re:Chicken (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893830)

I'll be big enough that even Palin won't miss.

YaBaDaBaDoo (4, Funny)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893530)

Excellent. I could use a baby mammoth to help with the dishes.

Obligatory... (5, Funny)

GeneralEmergency (240687) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893536)

Eh...It's a living.

A Modest Suggestion (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893614)

Know what would be cool? Create a new park in northern Canada and release some mammoths there.

They would, of course, need enough forage. But once they begin to thrive, bring back sabor tooth tigers to control the mammoth population.

It would beat polar bear watching in Churchill all to hell.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (1)

PatPending (953482) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893690)

Why not Mammoth, California [google.com] ?

Re:A Modest Suggestion (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893750)

I expect that a wild self-sustaining population would require an immense amount of land. Like Nunavut [polarnet.ca]

And I doubt that they would adapt to California politics and life style. Everyone know elephants are Republicans.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (2)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893752)

Know what would be cool? Create a new park in northern Canada and release some mammoths there. They would, of course, need enough forage. But once they begin to thrive, bring back sabor tooth tigers to control the mammoth population.

Cool idea overall, but the sabre-toothed tiger part is unnecessary. The most effective predator of the woolly mammoth is still available.

-=Steve=-

Re:A Modest Suggestion (4, Funny)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893906)

Naw, she's too busy running for President and taping her reality show.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (2)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893926)

She couldn't hit the broad side of a ... well, mammoth.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893756)

Robert Pollard may suggest Mammoth Caaaave [nps.gov]

Re:A Modest Suggestion (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893914)

But once they begin to thrive, bring back sabor tooth tigers to control the mammoth population.

Once they begin to thrive, open a hunting season on them.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893972)

Agreed. But they have to hunt on foot. And they can only use fire and spears with flint heads for weapons.

You know. Old school.

Re:A Modest Suggestion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34894004)

Bow season.

Now we'll find out.... (4, Interesting)

crhylove (205956) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893658)

If my theory is right and there is an ingredient in Mammoth meat that makes our species sane!

First step (1)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893668)

We can safely clone an animal that has been extinct and frozen for thousands on years.

Soon we will be able to put our heads in cryofreeze and become slow time travelers to the future.

Imagine! (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893712)

Two all mammoth patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun!

Re:Imagine! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893760)

Two all mammoth patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun!

Ovens are going to have to get a hell of a lot bigger
roast leg of mammoth anyone?

Undoing past wrongs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893784)

There's been a strong belief for a long time that we were responsible for the extinction of Mammoths. We definitely killed off many species like Dodos but we may have killed off most of the megafauna near the end of the last ice age so we may be able to undo some of the damage we have done. Outside of the cool factor there is a legitimate argument to be made for bringing them back.

Cloned/canned Woollies! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893802)

In all probability, the mammoths were really stupid, but very tasty.

We almost wiped out their cousins, the Buffalo, too. Ever had a Bison burger? Tasty!

We finally figured out that the third cousin of Mr. Mammoth, the cow, needed to be conserved and grown en mass.

So, McWooly's should have been available by now. At least we have something to look forward to if the cloning works!

Interesting Story Order (1)

high_rolla (1068540) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893826)

I find it quite interesting that this story comes straight after one that refers to insects and Jurassic Park.

Coincidence, I think not.

Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893882)

Isn't this going to destroy our perception of the phrase, "Mammoth tits?"

What about gut bacteria/etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34893908)

It's not like most large mammals are just that mammal and nothing else. We have gut bacteria and any other number of symbiotic entities living within us. We also get part of our immune system from breast milk (I assume this is the case for most mammals and not just humans). I wonder how they have addressed these issues.

the secondary problem (1, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#34893946)

once the mammoth is revived, how do we keep Sarah Palin from shooting it?

Re:the secondary problem (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894008)

As elephants, they're obviously all Republicans, so, no worries!

Re:the secondary problem (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894032)

Tell that to Harry Whittington.

Re:the secondary problem (5, Funny)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894020)

Hide him in a library.

I've heard this before... (1)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | more than 3 years ago | (#34894010)

This is what we in the REAL world like to call a 'bad idea'.

Didn't anyone see Jurassic Park?

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