×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Moon Rocket Scrubbed and Blown Dry

Hemos posted more than 10 years ago | from the preseving-our-past dept.

Space 305

loid_void writes "Reutersis is reporting that a giant Apollo moon rocket that never got off the ground is about to get a face-lift after years of rusting away in the Texas heat and humidity at the Johnson Space Center. Workers will construct a shelter for the Saturn V rocket and give it the equivalent of a "blow dry" in the first steps to preserve the relic of NASA's golden age, said Allan Needell, Apollo program curator for the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum. The 363-foot-long behemoth has lain on its side in front of JSC since 1977, a favorite sight of tourists, but also a victim of the elements. Instead of launching astronauts to the moon as it was built to do, it has become a slowly fading hulk of peeling paint and corroded metal where birds live and plants sprout, Needell said on Wednesday during a visit to the rocket. "There's a lot of biology growing on there," he said, pointing out streaks of algae staining the rocket's white skin."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

uhh (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457066)

hello ma' bitchezzz

i have the mod points bitchezzz reddy to be raped?

Blow Dry (-1, Troll)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457073)

JOHNSON space center.

RED ROCKET

Yeah, really cute. When I post stuff like that I get modded troll.

Sink it as an artificial reef? (4, Interesting)

KRYnosemg33 (709857) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457083)

I know large ships are often sunk as artificial reefs.

How cool would it be to sink a Saturn V rocket as an artificial reef!

Re:Sink it as an artificial reef? (2, Interesting)

ChristTrekker (91442) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457104)

Sink it nose up in 300' deep water.

Re:Sink it as an artificial reef? (2, Insightful)

PPGMD (679725) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457108)

How cool would it be to sink a Saturn V rocket as an artificial reef!

No because most people don't realize how massive of an accomplishment it was to get to the moon.

All of that rocket, fuel, and oxygen to carry the LM, and CSM, which are small in comparison.

Re:Sink it as an artificial reef? (2, Insightful)

confused one (671304) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457163)

It would be very un-cool.

Speaking as a wreck diver... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457176)

It would be a bit crap actually.

Ships have doors and are built for people to wander around and are highly accessible when sunk. Sinking an overgrown fuel cylinder to dive around would be about as interesting as watching 'The Sphere'...

Re:Sink it as an artificial reef? (4, Funny)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457226)

About as cool as grinding up the Spinx for an artificial reef.

Re:Sink it as an artificial reef? (2, Insightful)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457246)



How cool would it be to sink a Saturn V rocket as an artificial reef!


You say this because... why? There's almost as many (somewhat) complete Saturn V rockets as ships? So many that it's hard to come up with contructive uses for them, maybe?

My goodness.... (0, Offtopic)

Mz6 (741941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457091)

"There's a lot of biology growing on there"

Who talks like that anymore? I mean really. Nobody says, nice engine, there's a lot of friction going on in there".

Re:My goodness.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457221)

also, what else grows? "...biology on there" or "...stuff growing on there" would be fine. ok crystals grow, but it still sounds redundant.

Re:My goodness.... (1)

dirkdidit (550955) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457241)

Nobody says, nice engine, there's a lot of friction going on in there
You'd hope nobody would say that, friction is a good way to ruin a good engine. That's why you're "supposed to" put oil in it. Keyphrase being "supposed to."

Re:My goodness.... (1)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457278)

That doesn't change the fact that there is friction going on. When you create some zero-friction oil, drop me an email.

Re:My goodness.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457302)

Regardless, there is still lots of friction in any engine. Enough so to rob more than 50% of it's power, on average.

Wanna be rich? Make a polymer like teflon that won't melt under 1100F, and is easily formed into cylinders.

Re:My goodness.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457308)

there wasn't supposed to be biology growing on the Saturn either, dumbass.

Re:My goodness.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457312)

Well, even that's better. Friction is a physical phenomenon. It does "go on" in an engine just like it goes on anywhere else.

Biology, however, is the STUDY of life. Consider pointing to the stars and saying "A lot of astronomy goes on up there." That would be claiming the existence of extra-terrestrial intelligence, not stars.

NASA employees are next! (-1, Troll)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457095)

Think of the funding increases if they just used some deodorant!

(No offense to NASA employees, as they have the technology to rain down nuclear fire on my house from orbit..)

DOMKORE PUBLISHES FIRST META-TROLL. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457097)

In the first of a series of reflective and analytical meta-trolls (trolls on the subject of trolling) we examine parallels between the Slashdot Troll and the Urban Grafitii Artist. You have been owned by another DomKore Early Post special.

Just as the majority of Slashdot readers may be able to see no merit whatsoever it obvious troll postings, many of the urban middle class regard grafitii as pointless acts of vandalism. This viewpoint, clearly not reconciled with that of the 'artists' themselves arrises from nothing more sinister than a conflict of priorities. Police have their time wasted in the constant battle against grafitii vandalism -- their cynical view of the art and critical view of the artists arises mainly from the fact that it is their job to oppose them; similarly the middle class commuter who sees the apparent disregard for the city which their taxes have gone to pay for. Things look entirely different from the artists point of view who is in general more concerned with their own desire for self expression than they are with pissing off parents and police.

So perhaps there should be some compassion in recognising the different motives of the artist, and the same compassion could be shown to Trolls here on Slashdot. Please Consider the following for all you (readers and editors) who oppose trolling.

  • Why do you moderate trolls down? If its in order to get more mod points more quickly via good meta-mod then surely you must recognise the cyclic absurdidty of this position, both getting the points, and using them only in a way to please other people.
  • If trolls really offend you, why? Often trolls get to the bottom of the issue in a way that can bit shocking, inflamatory, funny, or just wired. Often the truth exposed by trolls is a difficult one to deal with and goes against the grain of traditional slashdot thinking.
  • Dont judge all trolls by the actions of one. The GNAA's repeated dull advertisemnts or links to lastmeasure are to trolling what people who 'tag' theit name everywhere are to Urban Art; mere weak imitators who generate enough nuisance and publicity.
  • Do you have no fucking sense of humour? Don't they even make you laugh, you sad git?

Thankyou, and Have a Nice Day [tm].

Xenophon, Renegade Master of DomKore

[ DomKore :: At the Game of the Head :: We own the game nigs ]
....[ Fuck you, fuck your momma, fuck your whole clique, ]....
....[ Matter 'fact fuck every nigger that you' down wit. ]....

hrm... (0, Troll)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457098)

Step 1: Steel Saturn V
Step 2: Steel phantom WMD from Iraq
Step 3: Put up a tent in some desert hell hole
Step 4: ???
Step 5: PROFIT!!

Re:hrm... (3, Funny)

Mz6 (741941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457111)

Step 4: Get arrested, thrown in jail and sell your story to the press.

Re:hrm... (4, Funny)

BabyDave (575083) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457216)

These days, it's more like

Step 4: Get taken to Guantanamo Bay
Step 5: ????
Step 6: ????
Step 7: ????
Step 8: ????
Step 9: ????
...

Re:hrm... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457122)

Step4: Learn to spell "steal"

Re:hrm... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457131)

Step 0: Learn how to spell "steal"

Re:hrm... (3, Funny)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457177)

Step 0: Buy a dictionary.

Re:hrm... (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457200)

Step 0: Learn how to spell 'steal.'

Re:hrm... (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457220)

how very cleaver ripping off the comment of AC

Re:hrm... (0, Offtopic)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457313)

Very 'cleaver'? Seems you need a dictionary, too.

Just because a comment is newer than another, that doesn't mean it was read first. Sometimes I have to wait to post a comment. Like _I'm_ going to 'rip off' an _AC_?! Please.

Re:hrm... (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457373)

this is slashdot and you aer w0reid about teh spealing?

Re:hrm... (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457423)

Hey, it was a joke. Then someone gets on my case, and misspells something doing so, yeah, I'm gonna comment on it. I always go for the easy joke. It's ... easier.

Jump back! (5, Funny)

TigerTale (414169) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457105)

You mean we used to go to the Moon?

Re:Jump back! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457121)

+1 Poignant

Re:Jump back! (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457426)

Of course not. Everyone knows it was all a hoax. Why do you think the Saturn V never got off the ground?

What a waste (2, Insightful)

Ra5pu7in (603513) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457107)

For all the people who fuss and complain about the money spent on actual space programs, this is a great example of the kind of wastefulness that goes on. And, now, rather than reuse or slag it, even more money will be spent to clean it up and display it. I'd rather see it broken apart, melted and recycled in more useful form than have a never-used moon rocket sitting in a museum.

Re:What a waste (5, Insightful)

Nakito (702386) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457146)

I'd rather see it broken apart, melted and recycled in more useful form than have a never-used moon rocket sitting in a museum.

Going to the moon may have been the greatest single physical achievement of the human race. There are only three remaining examples of the engine that took us there. This is one of them. I say, let's keep it.

Re:What a waste (4, Insightful)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457151)

Yah, God only knows how terrible it would be to preserve a piece of history!

And we'll we're at it, let's tear down the Washington Monument and make a Parking Garage there! No need to waste all that space and stone when we could make something useful of it...

Re:What a waste (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457152)

Yeah, because the used rockets make such good museum pieces..

But you're right, there's no sense in remembering things from the past. We should have melted down the Spirit of St. Louis, it has no place taking up space in a building.

In fact, that whole Smithsonian thing is such a waste! All that valuable real estate, wasted by useless relics of the past.

.. I really should add something to make it entirely clear I'm being sarcastic.

"Those who don't learn history are doomed to repeat it's mistakes." - paraphrased from someone famous.

Re:What a waste (5, Insightful)

PPGMD (679725) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457311)

Exactly. As a kid I remember standing in front of this rocket at JSC, and saying, "Wow!" Here was the object that took our men to the moon, quite possibly the largest moving vehicle that I have ever seen.

Years later when I was attending Embry-Riddle in Daytona Beach, I flew down to Titusville to see a friend. I went by the KSC during the evening (before the post 9-11 lock down), here in that night, I could almost feel the power, it was almost as moving as when I was a kid.

Without the past, people have nothing to aspire to, for most people what's in the books is simply writing, it's no more real than Lord of the Rings, but if you put a kid in the rocket park down there, history comes alive, here is what you are reading about, not just in words, but in towering moments to the men that rode them.

It inspired me, I would gladly pay for them to be around to inspire future generations.

Re:What a waste (3, Insightful)

Snowdog668 (227784) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457192)

I'd have to agree with you here. Especially since according to the article there's two other Saturn V's on display at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and Marshall Space Center in Alabama. If it were the only one left in existance I might be able to see spending the cash. Since this would be the third museum piece I think that the money would be better spent elsewhere.

Re:What a waste (1)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457509)

Perhaps.

But think about stuff 200-300 years in the future. What happens if a freak explosion, huricane, earthquake, etc. shreads through KSC or MSC and ruins one of the Saturn Vs? Over 10 years, not too likely, but over hundreds? Would you really want the one at JSC to be the only one that escaped destruction, yet somebody melted it down to cut costs?

Re:What a waste (2, Insightful)

MoxCamel (20484) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457198)

For all the people who fuss and complain about the money spent on actual space programs, this is a great example of the kind of wastefulness that goes on.

I agree! And all those stupid dinosaur bones cluttering up our museums...toss em! And all those damned paintings in the Looo-ver--digitize the damn things and burn em. Waste of space!

...is what I would have said if I were as ignorant as the original poster. There's probably more than a few scientists and/or astronauts who started down their career path by looking up at that piece of "waste," and thinking how wonderful it would be to be a part of something that great. Some things have more value than just their raw materials.

Re:What a waste (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457237)

You remind me of something I once read. I will post samples of it below so you can see if you agree.

"Too many idealists have lost sight of reality and flat out can't see how unreal their proposals are. "

Re:What a waste (2, Insightful)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457307)

Don't you think it would cost significantly more money to break it up and recycle it, just to get some Al and Fe that could be had elsewhere easier and cheaper?

The fact that it was not used 30 years ago is wasteful, but recycling it now would be even more of a waste.

Re:What a waste (1)

charboy1 (468037) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457344)

I'd rather see it broken apart, melted and recycled in more useful form than have a never-used moon rocket sitting in a museum.

But then how could Space Center Houston [spacecenter.org] make any money? The Saturn V is a major attraction in the JSC tram tour. I think the web site (sorry for the music) gives you the right flavor. PLEASE remember that Space Center Houston is not NASA.

- charboy

JSC's Relics (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457383)

Slag history. Nice troll.

Most of the public will never see all of JSC's relics. The center is a small museum in itself. Tucked away in various display cases at different locations are relics and images from NASA's history. Rocket Park is the most publicly-accessable and visible example (with the historical Mission Control being a close second). However, there are also everything from space suits to models of early Shuttle designs used in anechoic chamber tests on display in buildings only accessable by NASA employees.

Granted - JSC is no Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. But there are a lot of small, neat things to see if you ever get the chance.

Re:What a waste (1)

NewNole2001 (717720) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457463)

Go see the one they have hung up at the Kennedy Space Center, you'll be in awe and pissed that you ever made this comment.

NASA's golden age? (5, Insightful)

Pi_0's don't shower (741216) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457118)

I have to object to referring to the 1960's/70's as NASA's golden age. Surely, that should be regarded as NASA's infancy, and that NASA's golden age [yahoo.com] may be yet to come? Maybe it's too optimistic, but I'm a 25 year old astrophysics grad student, and I know how much is out there waiting to be explored and examined -- I don't want to have to live my life in the belief that my industry's best days were before I was born!

Re:NASA's golden age? (5, Funny)

cerebralsugar (203167) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457155)

It's not too optimistic at all, it just won't be done by NASA. Everyone who has seen Star Trek knows we will have to have a 3rd world war first, and then a drunken scientist resembling James Cromwell will invent warp drive in an alcoholic haze. Then of course, Starfleet will be borne, and we will all want to shag either that vulcan girl and that hot african communications lady.

Re:NASA's golden age? (3, Informative)

Sounder40 (243087) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457376)

Thank goodness for kids like you, because I've lost hope of ever seeing space. As a kid, the goal of space travel for us all seemed so close. We were sending men to the moon all the time, so how long would it take until we could all go?

As a kid, I grew up wanting to work at NASA like my dad. He worked at JSC (used to be "Manned" Space Center before being renamed after LBJ) from 1963 until 1990. I worked in and around JSC and Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Al. for 15 years, and, believe me, a lot of the optimism is gone. It's become too much of a business run by big companies. With the appointment of Sean O'Keefe, I hope that things change. Time will tell.

Re:NASA's golden age?We just need more people to c (1)

Manhigh (148034) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457193)

Agreed. Mod Parent Up.

We need goals. I want to live my life trying to do something big for humanity. Too many people these days see their job as a necessary evil to getting a paycheck.

Re:NASA's golden age? (4, Interesting)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457280)

It all depends.

The 60s/70s are definately the infancy of humanity in space. They hopefully are *not* the only golden age of humanity in space.

They may, however, be the golden age of NASA, when NASA could do no wrong.

It all depends on the next 20 years, I'd say. Will NASA continue to be the only road to space, or will National Geographic or the Discovery Channel be able to mount their own space missions? I mean, the last space IMAX film made 50 million. That doesn't buy you much now, but if launch costs are down, you might be able to fund a mission just for the IMAX film.

It's really an open question for me if the government, academia, or private industry is best suited to really explore space. Each one has their drawbacks, but so far the government has been in the driver's seat.

So yeah, there's probably room for a even-more-golden age in the future (call it the palladium age ;) ) but it may not be at NASA's behest.

Our current Babylon-5-esque best hope for space is probably the garage hacking of Scaled COmposites and Armadillo Aerospace.

Re:NASA's golden age? (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457521)



The 60s/70s are definately the infancy of humanity in space. They hopefully are *not* the only golden age of humanity in space.

They may, however, be the golden age of NASA, when NASA could do no wrong.


It was also a time period when NASA was properly funded and (mostly) ran by the guys with sliderules in their pockets. Today's NASA has the potential. But it'll take funding and a major overhaul. I don't see how either will happen.

glory days behind us (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457297)

The sad fact is, that not only are the glory days of NASA behind us, but the glory days in general are behind us. I, for one, have an extreamly bleak outlook on the future, and I am sure I am not alone.

Finally something nasa engineers can do (-1, Troll)

minamar (786261) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457126)

It's taken them several years and untold billions of dollars, but finally NASA has a project they can handle. *drum roll* they can re-paint a 30yr old rocket. I'm glad my tax dollars and american pride is so well invested.

Re:Finally something nasa engineers can do (1)

nizo (81281) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457224)

It's taken them several years and untold billions of dollars, but finally NASA has a project they can handle. *drum roll* they can re-paint a 30yr old rocket. I'm glad my tax dollars and american pride is so well invested.

Maybe they can get corporate sponsors to paint logos on the side to help defer the cost of upkeep? Nothing says 'merica like a big McDonald's M(tm) on the side of an unused million dollar rocket.

Re:Finally something nasa engineers can do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457304)

Million? Probably the better part of a billion- even in 1960's dollars.

Re:Finally something nasa engineers can do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457336)

+1 funny to minamar and nizo.

Don't they just sound like a slapstick comedy team?
And with uid's of 786261 and 81281, they'll get the hard-core and the ne0phytes.

Re:Finally something nasa engineers can do (1)

nizo (81281) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457397)

Everytime I see my UID I think of the Van Halen OU812 album for some reason.....

Another waste of money (-1, Troll)

ElForesto (763160) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457133)

And how much do you think that rocket cost? It's a real shame to see what is likely millions of dollars having gone to waste like this.

Re:Another waste of money (4, Insightful)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457392)

What do you think happened to that money? They laminated $100 bills and used that for the skin?

No. A whole bunch of contractor companies were hired to design, build, and test parts of it. Companies that hired people. Thousands of skilled people. People that got paid a good salary for a good days work. People that supported tens of thousands of other people by buying food, clothes, cars, houses.

So it didn't get used. The budget and interest ran out. A shame, but not like the money was wasted.

What would you prefer we have done with that money? Collect taxes and merely give it away?

Re:Another waste of money (1)

irontiki (607290) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457569)

Whole industries got a boost or were even created with that money...<cough>computers</cough>.

The Tang [safeshopper.com] industry is still benefiting mankind as well as other lots of other stuff too [thespaceplace.com] .

Re:Another waste of money (2, Interesting)

Flying Purple Wombat (787087) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457409)

They ought to auction it on ebay. I wonder what it would go for...

Re:Another waste of money (1)

Apage43 (708800) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457591)

Auction a Saturn V on eBay? Think of the shipping cost!

Anyone else read... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457134)

blow job?

No? Well I did, and my first thought was "that must be one helluva mouth.."

Kansas Cosmosphere (4, Interesting)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457142)

I wonder if they'll have any involvement. After all they [cosmo.org] single-handedly restored the Liberty Bell 7 [cnn.com] (their link here [cosmo.org] . And also helped with the restoration of the Apollo 13 [nasa.gov] as well. When you tought of Kansas, you probably didn't think of space now did ya?

Re:Kansas Cosmosphere (4, Interesting)

wowbagger (69688) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457264)

Sad to say, but I just went through JSC a couple of weeks ago, and I really wasn't impressed.

This is Johnson freaking Space CENTER for crying out loud - yet the items they had on display at the visitor's center weren't much better than the items in the Hall Of Space at the Cosmosphere - in many ways KSC has them beat (KSC's Redstone rocket is in better shape, KSC has an SR-71 in addition to the T-38, KSC has the original Apollo "White Room").

Look, JSC *is* NASA - KSC is a private sector organization in the middle of Kansas (more or less).

It just doesn't seem right for me to be walking around JSC's visitor center saying "Yawn. Ho-hum. Got anything better?"

Re:Kansas Cosmosphere (1)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457404)

Yea :-/ kinda sux.

Reno residents still get in free? I might have to stop in my next trip back 'home' :)

Re:Kansas Cosmosphere (5, Funny)

daeley (126313) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457371)

When you tought of Kansas, you probably didn't think of space now did ya?

Having suffered through several cross-Kansas drives during Summer vacation trips as a kid, I can tell you there is just about nothing *but* space in Kansas. ;)

Re:Kansas Cosmosphere (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457411)

If you ever drive I-70 through eastern CO and KS, you'll see signs indicating that a community is the home of an astronaut. I always wondered if there was a skewed distribution of astronauts coming out of the rural areas.

An important piece of history (4, Insightful)

Sean80 (567340) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457150)

Obviously, for any geek worth their stripes, the Saturn V rockets are a pretty awesome piece of history. Well, for this geek at least. It honestly surprises me that they let it come to this in the first place. Does anybody know what the condition of the other 2 is? How was it that this one was not deemed historically significant enough to be taken of?

Although I've lived in the US for a few years now, I've never had the opportunity to go see some of this stuff. Seeing this thing cleaned up and in a permanent display will definitely be worth the price of admission.

Re:An important piece of history (1)

wiljefv (662722) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457223)

I agree it is a great tribute to determination and ingenuity of man. Maybe it should be on display on more of a world stage so that all mankind can remember and be proud of the accomplishment.

Re:An important piece of history (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457263)

WTF does 'world stage" mean? Anyone can travel to Texas and see the damn thing.

How do you get more open than that?

Re:An important piece of history (1)

mojotoad (78874) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457362)

I just recently visited with the one on display at the Space Museum in Huntsville, AL (my home town, actually). It seems to be suffering a similar fate, but I didn't notice lots of "biology" in the thing.

There is a restoration project [aata.net] for Huntsville's Saturn V as well.

Matt

Re:An important piece of history (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457430)

How was it that this one was not deemed historically significant enough to be taken of?

Because LBJ died, and Dubya's in the Other party?

Re:An important piece of history (3, Informative)

Gunfighter (1944) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457468)

With most of the Saturn V rockets weathering away thanks to the elements, I can not stress what a difference it can make to actually go to the Kennedy Space Center and see the restored Saturn V inside the (air conditioned... thank heavens) Apollo/Saturn V Center. Not only do you get the to see the rocket itself, but they also have a full blown tour complete with a view of the launch pads and (for us geeks) the actual consoles used at launch control. Definitely worth a visit.

Side note: If you stay in the Cocoa Beach area overnight, make sure you book yourself on the big casino cruise boat for that evening. Even if you don't gamble, it's free, fun, and the buffet rocks.

Let's make it into a diner! (4, Funny)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457162)

And in honor of the Saturn V incredible amount of thrust, we'll only serve partially-cooked Mexican food, broccoli and Velamints!

not a waste- good for morale and education (4, Insightful)

jpnews (647965) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457205)

I live in Houston and I've visited JSC a lot of times through the years. The Saturn V is in bad condition, and has been steadily getting worse. Something surely needs to be done.

And to those who have called it a waste of resources, I have only this to say. All the money in the world won't be of any use if we don't create another generation of engineers and scientists. I've personally seen the look in a kid's eyes when they get up close to something enormous and meaningful. You just can't buy that.

I partially agree......... (1)

reality-bytes (119275) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457335)

All the money in the world won't be of any use if we don't create another generation of engineers and scientists. I've personally seen the look in a kid's eyes when they get up close to something enormous and meaningful. You just can't buy that.


I agree that we need projects and items which inspire the current generation to believe that will still have the ability to get out and explore. I also believe that it is the likes of daring private projects such as Scaled Composites [scaledcomposites.com] who best serve this need.

I know that 'Space Ship One' is by no means an orbital system but what about its succesors?

Lighting bloody-great big fireworks and pointing them in the general direction of orbit is probably not the most efficient means of getting anywhere.

We need to be exploring new ideas and concepts rather that always referring to the 'good old days' of the point and pray rockets.

I agree, that as a homage to the histroy of the early space-age a Saturn V should be preserved in near-perfect viewable condition. However, if the money for preservation could alternatively be channeled back into r&d, then preserving more than one example of a complete Saturn V would be wasteful.

*cough*ahem (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457357)

I've personally seen the look in a kid's eyes when they get up close to something enormous

Michael Jackson beggs to differ.

YES! (5, Interesting)

Sounder40 (243087) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457206)

I drive past it several times a week (down Saturn Drive for the locals), and it just makes me sick to see it in the shape it's in. Thank God it's finally going to be taken care of and treated as the treasure it is. The pictures don't do justice to the damage being done to the ship.

By the way, as a teenager, I was horrified to hear that they were going to display it on its side. I thought for sure that it was going to be displayed upright. What a dweeb I was (am?). Yeah, that would be great: make it so you could only see the bottom. And then there's the problems it would cause with low-flying aircraft, (lots of them, including those annoying advertizement-pulling planes). Oh, and we get hurricanes down here in these parts.

Re:YES! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457379)

It should be standing straight up.

A little bit of reinforcement, and a tower or two, and boom. Standing proudly. 300' isn't THAT tall.

But, it's good that its getting some nice treatment now. Awesome piece.

Thank God? (2, Funny)

DaveKAO (320532) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457417)

Don't you mean thank the American tax payer?

Re:Thank God? (1)

Sounder40 (243087) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457445)

Yeah, I guess you're right. Slip of the keyboard... ;-)

Re:YES! (3, Informative)

nanter (613346) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457437)

In Huntsville, Alabama, they have an old Saturn rocket that is displayed upright at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

Quite a sight when flying in. You you weren't that much of a dweeb for thinking they would do the same with that rocket.

Heh (0, Offtopic)

Mitchell Mebane (594797) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457249)

Did anybody else read that as 'Moon Scrubbed and Blown Dry'? :P

Re:Heh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457649)

No.

Isn't that interesting?

Great pick-up line... (4, Funny)

thoolie (442789) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457285)

Am I the only one who sees this as a great pick up line?

Me: Hay baby, you want to scrup and blowm my rocket clean?

Random gal: *SLAP*.... jerk!

Me: BUT I PICKED IT UP ON SLASHDOT!!

Re:Great pick-up line... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457664)

Slashdot inspired pickup lines are the most effective contraceptive there is.

Novel use for old rocket (3, Funny)

OriginalArlen (726444) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457300)

Surely it's obvious that, in the interests of science, this rocket should be renovated, refueled, and have a Chevy Impala tacked on the top, where it lies.

Reutersis? (0, Offtopic)

sharkdba (625280) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457330)

Reutersis is reporting that a giant Apollo moon rocket...

For a while I thought that Reuter got a sister I don't know about...

One in Huntsville, too (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457358)

A similar effort is under way at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center [ussrc.com] in Huntsville, Alabama. In fact, they've created a special license plate to help raise funds. Otherwise, the Smithsonian has threatened to take the Saturn V back. (Which would certainly be an interesting sight.) You can see the license plate at the bottom of this page [state.al.us] .

Plastic (2, Funny)

DaveKAO (320532) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457382)

I thought Saturn's used plastic body panels and therefore couldn't rust? Oh wait... that's the car company.

do something useful (2, Interesting)

real gumby (11516) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457386)

The best way to honor the memory of "NASA's golden age" would be to top it.

NASA does excellent unmanned science, but the moon shot, cool as it was, wasn't good science or space policy.

Good thing private efforts are starting to pick up the slack. [xprize.org]

I must add that the most awe-inspiring thing to me is that all the construction, design and launch was done on slide rules [hpmuseum.org] .

Re:do something useful (1)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457602)

I'd beg to differ about the science thing.

We know a lot more about it because of the manned landings than we did because of all of the *unmanned* probes. When's the last time you heard about any real results from anybody *but* the apollo astronauts and the folks who analized the stuff they brought back.

Although I'd definately agree it wasn't especially good space policy.

I'm not surprised about the whole slide rule thing, really. Longer calculations mean that you get it 85% right and robust instead of trying to get it 100% right.

Saturn V Engines (5, Interesting)

Sounder40 (243087) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457420)

When I was at Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Al., they used to test the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engines) at a test stand a few miles from my building. I was amazed at the power and noise of the SSMEs until an oldtimer told me what it was like when they tested one of the Saturn V engines: He said your coffee cup would literally bounce off of the desk, and forget talking on the phone during a test fire. And that was just the one engine. Imagine what it was like when they all fired at the same time...

Re:Saturn V Engines (4, Interesting)

domodude (613072) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457617)

All of that testing actually worked. Not one of the 32 Saturn V rockets ever exploded; this is amazing when you think of how there are literally millions of parts that could break and cause a critical failure. Wernher von Braun, who also helped with the German V2 rocket, truly was a genius.

Reutersis? (1)

sunilonline (609351) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457446)

Is that some new type of disease?

rusting? (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457452)

"after years of rusting away"

rusty titanium?

Surely its not made of ferrous metal?
or even got much ferrous metal in it...?

No way that $4M could be better spent.../sarcasm (1)

cryophan (787735) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457549)

Cant we find a better way to spend $4M, like cancer research. Anyway, I only support the space program for real and cost-efficient research, meaning we need to stop sending up humans.

Whoa! (1)

Trogdorsey (739381) | more than 10 years ago | (#9457561)

That'll the longest blow job ever

"Scrubbed and Blown Dry" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9457665)

My girlfriend does it to me nightly.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?