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Predicting the Risk of Suicide by Analyzing the Text of Clinical Notes

J05H (5625) writes | about 3 months ago

0

J05H (5625) writes "Soldier and veteran suicide rates are increasing due to various factors. Critically the rates have jumped in recent years. Bayesian search experts use gathered, anonymous Veteran's Administration notes to predict suicide risks. The main link is to the paper in PLoS One. A related effort by Mr. Poulin is the Durkheim Project that uses opt-in social media data for similar purposes http://www.durkheimproject.org..."
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Texas Unleashes Stampede for Science

aarondubrow (1866212) writes | 1 year,14 days

0

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "You hear it before you see it — a roar like a factory in full production. But instead of cars or washing machines, this factory produces scientific knowledge.

Stampede, the newest supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) and one of the most advanced scientific research instruments in the world, fills aisle after aisle of a new 11,000-square-foot data center on the J.J. Pickle Research Campus of The University of Texas at Austin. Over the past year TACC staff designed, built and deployed Stampede, working closely with Dell and Intel engineers and university researchers.

According to the November 2012 Top 500 list of supercomputers, Stampede is the seventh-most powerful advanced computing system on the planet, but it is the most powerful in the U.S. dedicated to academic research, capable of outperforming 100,000 home computers. In the first three months of operations, approximately 600 projects and more than 1,200 scientists have run on Stampede. These include top researchers in every field of inquiry from earthquake prediction to brain tumor imaging to CO2 capture and conversion."

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Soyuz Breaks Speed Record to ISS

Zothecula (1870348) writes | 1 year,14 days

0

Zothecula (1870348) writes "A manned Soyuz spacecraft set a record for traveling to the International Space Station (ISS), arriving six hours after launch instead of the usual two days. Soyuz 34 lifted off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, March 28 at 4:43 p.m. EDT (08:43 GMT) and docked with the ISS at 10: 28 PM EDT (03:28 GMT). It was able to catch up and match trajectories with the ISS in only four orbits using new techniques previously tested in ISS rendezvouses with Russian unmanned Progress cargo ships."
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Ask Slashdot: Explaining to my girlfriend that humans didn't ride dinosaurs

p00kiethebear (569781) writes | 1 year,15 days

4

p00kiethebear writes "Dear Slashdot. Remember when you learned that Santa Clause wasn't real? I have a wonderful and beautiful girlfriend. She treats me so right in every way. We've been together for almost a year now and everything seemed to be going perfectly until this morning. Over breakfast we were discussing dinosaurs and she told me a story about how her grandfather, fifty years ago, dated footprints of a dinosaurs and a man that were right next to each other to be within the same epoch of history. I laughed when she said this and then realized that she wasn't joking. She seriously believes this. She believes dinosaurs and humans walked at the same time together. Her grandfather told her this when she was little so regular logic and wiki isn't going to be able to contest her childhood dreams that she has been raised to believe. The odd thing is that she's not religious, it's just what her archeologist grandfather taught her. More important than just backing up evidence to the contrary, how do I explain this to her without crushing her childhood dreams? Is it even worth discussing it further with her? Have you ever had a loved one or family member that believed something that made you uncomfortable?"
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Making Robots Mimic the Human Hand

RougeFemme (2871421) writes | 1 year,17 days

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RougeFemme (2871421) writes "As part of a research project to develop low-cost artificial hands, DARPA has developed a two hand robot that can almost change a tire. Research has mastered grasping objects with robotic hands; the next objective is to manipulate the objects once grasped. Research also continues on a neural interface, a direct link between a robotic arm and the human brain. The ultimate goal of the research project is to develop prostethics and robotic arms for wider use, by reducing cost and improving dexterity and machine vision."
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A new genetic code found

Shipud (685171) writes | 1 year,17 days

0

Shipud (685171) writes "A group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Yale University and the Joint Genome Institute have isolated single cells of otherwise elusive and unculturable SR1 bacteria and sequenced their genomes. They found that SR1 deviate from the genetic code in a way previously unknown: what codes for "stop making proteins" in most organisms, is used differently in SR1, to actually continue making them. This study shows the power of a new technology, single-cell DNA sequencing, to reveal genetic information. SR1 bacteria are found in our mouths, and are suspected to cause periodontitis."
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Does Thinking Science Make People More Ethical?

alysion (2621835) writes | 1 year,17 days

0

alysion writes "Per research published in the online journal PLOS One, psychologists Christine Ma-Kellams of Harvard University and Jim Blascovich of the University of California, Santa Barbara report, "Thinking about science leads individuals to endorse more stringent moral norms." Salon.com covered the story. In one of the four supporting experiments, undergraduates considered an account of a date rape and were asked to judge behavior on a scale of 1 to 100. Science types, perhaps not surprisingly, proved to have a better grasp of reality, including the moral kind."

NASA Asteroid Capture Mission to Be Proposed in 2014 Budget

MarkWhittington (1084047) writes | 1 year,17 days

0

MarkWhittington writes "Included in President Obama's 2014 budget request will be a $100 million line item for NASA for a mission to capture and bring an asteroid to a high orbit around the moon where it will be explored by asteroinauts. Whether the $2.6 billion mission is a replacement or a supplement to the president's planned human mission to an asteroid is unclear. The proposal was first developed by the Keck Institite in April, 2012 and has achieved new impetus due to the meteor incident over Russia and new fears of killer asteroids."
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A Computer Inside a Cell

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 1 year,17 days

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "For the first time, synthetic biologists have created a genetic device that mimics one of the widgets on which all of modern electronics is based, the three-terminal transistor. Like standard electronic transistors, the new biological transistor is expected to work in many different biological circuit designs. Together with other advances in crafting genetic circuitry, that should make it easier for scientists to program cells to do everything from monitor pollutants and the progression of disease to turning on the output of medicines and biofuels."
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4-Billion-Pixel Panorama From Curiosity Rover Brings Mars to Your Computer Scree

SternisheFan (2529412) writes | 1 year,18 days

0

SternisheFan writes "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA’s Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images.

After several technical glitches shut down operations for a while, Curiosity resumed its science investigations earlier this week. Before the shutdown, the rover had been hard at work drilling into the Martian surface and discovering excellent evidence that the planet was once a place that could have hosted life. Though the probe is back up and running, it will be ceasing operations for a while beginning in April, when Earth and Mars are on opposite sides of the sun, which can mess with communications.

In the meantime, we can enjoy this mosaic created by photographer Andrew Bodrov of Estonia, whose previous panorama let you stand on Mars next to Curiosity. The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover’s two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover’s eventual destination."

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Human Brain Cells Injected In Mice, They Get Smarter

kkleiner (1468647) writes | 1 year,18 days

0

kkleiner writes "In an experiment that might seem like something only a mad scientist would conjure, researchers injected human brain cells into the brains of mice to see how it would affect the way the mice thought. It did: the mice got smarter. But the cognition boosting cells weren’t neurons, they were the red-headed step-children of neuroscience called astrocytes. The study turns on its head the role historically attributed to astrocytes of simply supporting the all important function of neurons without playing a significant role in how we learn and think."
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What does it actually cost to publish a scientific paper?

ananyo (2519492) writes | 1 year,18 days

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ananyo (2519492) writes "Nature has published an investigation into the real costs of publishing research after delving into the secretive, murky world of science publishing. Few publishers (open access or otherwise-including Nature Publishing Group) would reveal their profit margins, but they've pieced together a picture of how much it really costs to publish a paper by talking to analysts and insiders.
Quoting from the piece: "The costs of research publishing can be much lower than people think,” agrees Peter Binfield, co-founder of one of the newest open-access journals, PeerJ, and formerly a publisher at PLoS. But publishers of subscription journals insist that such views are misguided — born of a failure to appreciate the value they add to the papers they publish, and to the research community as a whole. They say that their commercial operations are in fact quite efficient, so that if a switch to open-access publishing led scientists to drive down fees by choosing cheaper journals, it would undermine important values such as editorial quality." There's also a comment piece by three open access advocates setting out what they think needs to happen next to push forward the movement as well as a piece arguing that "Objections to the Creative Commons attribution license are straw men raised by parties who want open access to be as closed as possible.""

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Air Force exploring systems that safeguard spacecraft network security

coondoggie (973519) writes | 1 year,19 days

0

coondoggie writes "How are all manner of spacecraft development from the space parts supply chain to actual space operations protected from those who would try to penetrate or disrupt the networks involved in that process?

The US Air Force Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has put out a call for research to understand that security scenario stating that "we are much less concerned about information on the broader themes of cyber-security but rather those that pertain to the mission of the spacecraft, the spacecraft as a platform, the systems that constitute the spacecraft, the computers and their software, the busses and networks within, and the elements that interface to the spacecraft..."

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Bees Communicate with Electric Fields

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 1 year,19 days

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "The electric fields that build up on honey bees as they fly, flutter their wings, or rub body parts together may allow the insects to talk to each other, a new study suggests. Tests show that the electric fields, which can be quite strong, deflect the bees' antennae, which, in turn, provide signals to the brain through specialized organs at their bases. Antenna deflections induced by an electrically charged honey bee wing are about 10 times the size of those that would be caused by airflow from the wing fluttering at the same distance—a sign that electrical fields could be an important signal."
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Microbes May Slim Us Down After Gastric Bypass

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 1 year,19 days

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Gastric bypass surgery is supposed to work by shrinking the size of the stomach, leading to rapid weight loss. But a new study reveals that the procedure changes the population of microbes in our guts, and that these microbes themselves may be helping us lose weight. When researchers transfered microbes from mice that had undergone gastric bypass to mice that hadn't, the recipeint mice loss 5% of their body weight in two weeks. No surgery required."
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Eric Schmidt funds oceanography research ship

ananyo (2519492) writes | 1 year,19 days

0

ananyo writes "Google board chair Eric Schmidt and his wife Wendy have paid to turn a former fishery-protection vessel into a research ship for oceanographers, featuring a sauna, a glassed-in lounge and a helicopter pad. The R/VFalkor, an 83-metre former fishery-protection vessel, was retrofitted by the Schmidt Ocean Institute, at a cost of US$60 million. It's named after a lucky dragon in the film The NeverEnding Story.
Unlike James Cameron, who is holding back many of the discoveries from his plunge into the Mariana Trench for use in a feature film (the sub was donated to Woods Hole) , managers of R/VFalkor research favour projects are emphasizing open data. Data sharing is not a requirement for research proposals, says Victor Zykov, Schmidt Ocean’s director of research, but those that include an open-data component are ranked higher than those of equal scientific value that do not.
The ship’s first full-length science cruise ends on 29 March when it returns to port in St Petersburg, Florida, after a three-week trip."

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New study shows organic food the healthier choice

metrix007 (200091) writes | 1 year,19 days

0

metrix007 (200091) writes "A study done in the wake of the controversial Stanford study on Organic food which showed that there was no advantage, has been performed on fruit flies which have long been used to model effects on humans. The studies show that in almost every category, organic food has a clear advantage. Better fertility, less chance of disease, longer lives etc. I've been pretty skeptical of the entire organic food debacle thinking it easy to dismiss, but this evidence is convincing. The actual study is here."
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